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Robert Philip Hanssen

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NEWS
February 21, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she does each day, 13-year-old Hadley Greene planned to cut through her best friend's backyard Tuesday to get to her own home in this quiet Washington suburb. This time, however, it was surrounded by yellow police tape marking the scene of an investigation--one that the nation's top law enforcement officials say is uncovering one of the "most traitorous actions imaginable."
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NEWS
April 3, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former FBI agent Robert Philip Hanssen has told government investigators that his 22-year career as a Russian spy was driven by money as he sought to cover house payments and parochial school tuition for his six children, law enforcement sources said Tuesday. Hanssen's admission, disclosed in a high-level report due out Thursday, marks the first time he has divulged his motivation for spying.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Near the end, Robert Philip Hanssen descended into a madness of his own making. Caution gone, he prowled the darkness of a neighborhood park with a penlight searching for a signal that wasn't there. A lumbering figure, he waved his arms and seemed to shout at the sky. "I have come about as close as I ever want to come to sacrificing myself to help you and I get silence. I hate silence," he had complained a few months earlier when communications with his Russian handlers had lapsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's as twisted and foreboding in here as an Al Qaeda cave. Very crowded too, for many have gravitated to this remote spot, hoping to understand the former FBI senior counterintelligence agent's reasons for betraying his country to the Soviet Union and later Russia. Squeezing in now are famed novelist Norman Mailer and author-filmmaker Lawrence Schiller. "Betrayal was at the very core of his soul," Mailer proclaimed about Robert Philip Hanssen in the lead segment of Sunday's "60 Minutes" on CBS, with Schiller giving thumbs up. How were Mailer and Schiller able to gain access to Hanssen's mind and make their way through its complex warrens to "the very core of his soul"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001
Re "U.S. Charges FBI Agent With Spying for Russia Since 1985," Feb. 21: Let me see if I have my facts straight: Robert Philip Hanssen, who faces a possible death sentence if convicted, and his predecessor, Aldrich Ames, are evil traitors who deserve nothing but scorn and disgrace because they spied on their country (the U.S.) for the enemy (Russia), which directly led to death sentences and execution for noble and courageous men who spied on their country (Russia) for the enemy (the U.S.)
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Perry Hood said he always thought there was something odd about the woman who bought his Vienna, Va., home in December. Ann Manning offered a great price and paid cash. She even ignored an inspection report pointing out loose bathroom tiles and fogged-up windows. Her only condition: Hood and his wife, Laura, had to be out in two weeks flat. Then, after all the rush, Hood heard from his old neighbors on Talisman Drive that no one had bothered to move in. On Feb. 20, things became much clearer.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen may have alerted Moscow to a secret tunnel built under its embassy here, a published report says. Hanssen, a 25-year FBI veteran and counterintelligence expert arrested last month and charged with spying for Moscow since 1985, "compromised an entire technical program of enormous value, expense and importance to the United States government," according to an FBI affidavit filed in the Hanssen case.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
U.S. officials released new details Tuesday on the case against suspected spy Robert Philip Hanssen, including what is described as his farewell letter to his Russian handlers. Hanssen, a veteran FBI counterintelligence official, wrote the letter after realizing that the government suspected him of spying, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft said Tuesday that the government may seek the death penalty against Robert Philip Hanssen, the veteran FBI agent accused of spying for Moscow. But former prosecutors and other experts said the Justice Department will face major legal hurdles if it tries to apply a 1994 law that provides capital punishment for divulging the identity of a U.S. agent to a foreign country, causing the agent's death.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Robert Philip Hanssen, a 25-year veteran FBI agent, was indicted Wednesday on espionage charges. Federal prosecutors said the father of six "betrayed his country for over 15 years" and seriously compromised the security of the country. If convicted, he could be sentenced to death. The 57-page indictment handed up by a grand jury in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | JONATHAN DANN and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the same time he was selling U.S. secrets to the Soviet Union, former FBI special agent Robert Philip Hanssen was a key supervisor in a 1980s domestic-spying program questioning the loyalty of American citizens and monitoring their activities, newly obtained FBI documents show. Under this program, federal agents filed reports on teachers, clerics and political activists who primarily were affiliated with liberal causes.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the FBI's admission that it cannot find hundreds of its weapons and laptop computers, several bureau officials joined lawmakers in strongly criticizing the agency's structure, technology and institutional culture during a Senate hearing Wednesday. Senate Judiciary Committee members said the disclosure Tuesday that 449 firearms and 184 computers are missing represents the latest in a string of recent FBI failures that expose the agency's many flaws.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators are trying to determine whether fired FBI agent Robert Philip Hanssen may have begun spying for the Russians as early as 1979, when he apparently was caught by his wife counting large, unexplained amounts of cash, a source familiar with the investigation said Friday. The Justice Department has charged publicly that the former counterespionage agent began spying for the Russians in 1985 in exchange for $1.4 million in cash and diamonds.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Associates of FBI Director Louis J. Freeh are urging him to postpone his upcoming retirement for a few months to help the agency ride out the turmoil caused by its miscues involving Oklahoma City bomber Timothy J. McVeigh and accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Robert Philip Hanssen, a 25-year veteran FBI agent, was indicted Wednesday on espionage charges. Federal prosecutors said the father of six "betrayed his country for over 15 years" and seriously compromised the security of the country. If convicted, he could be sentenced to death. The 57-page indictment handed up by a grand jury in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for Robert Philip Hanssen, the accused FBI spy, have abruptly rejected entreaties from federal prosecutors that they enter into a plea agreement and have told the government they are ready to proceed to trial on espionage charges. The sticking point is the refusal of prosecutors to promise Hanssen before any plea that they would not ask a judge to impose the death penalty on him.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators are trying to determine whether fired FBI agent Robert Philip Hanssen may have begun spying for the Russians as early as 1979, when he apparently was caught by his wife counting large, unexplained amounts of cash, a source familiar with the investigation said Friday. The Justice Department has charged publicly that the former counterespionage agent began spying for the Russians in 1985 in exchange for $1.4 million in cash and diamonds.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen charged Wednesday that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft violated the Justice Department's own guidelines by publicly threatening to consider the death penalty against the former FBI agent to coerce a plea bargain. Justice Department guidelines ban the government from using the death penalty to leverage its position in plea negotiations.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys for accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen charged Wednesday that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft violated the Justice Department's own guidelines by publicly threatening to consider the death penalty against the former FBI agent to coerce a plea bargain. Justice Department guidelines ban the government from using the death penalty to leverage its position in plea negotiations.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft said Tuesday that the government may seek the death penalty against Robert Philip Hanssen, the veteran FBI agent accused of spying for Moscow. But former prosecutors and other experts said the Justice Department will face major legal hurdles if it tries to apply a 1994 law that provides capital punishment for divulging the identity of a U.S. agent to a foreign country, causing the agent's death.
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