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Robert Pinsky

ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
What does it mean to celebrate the written word? It means getting excited about, well, everything. At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at UCLA this weekend, authors will talk about cooking and former Vice President Dick Cheney, baseball and literature, poetry and politics, even life after Marcia Brady. Maureen McCormick, former cast member of TV's "The Brady Bunch," joins celebrity memoirists Cloris Leachman, Alonzo Mourning, Marlee Matlin, Diahann Carroll and Michael J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2005 | Lisa Leff, Associated Press
In the years after he wrote "Howl," Allen Ginsberg alternately described the poem as a song of spiritual liberation, a homage to art, an ode to gay love and a lament for his mentally ill mother. The Beat poet who defined his times with the salvo "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness," gave perhaps the most adroit explanation, however, upon publication of the original facsimile edition of the tour de force that had launched his career more than three decades earlier.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | DAVID L. ULIN
Czeslaw Milosz is a figure of contradiction, a poet whose best-known effort, "The Captive Mind," is a nonfiction study of the lure of totalitarian thinking, a hero of Polish democracy who has lived in exile since 1951. Although he won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1980, he remains familiar to most American readers by reputation, if at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | PENELOPE MOFFET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Matching an art form of the ages with the technology of the '90s, an entrepreneur has come up with "Off the Page: The First Video Poetry Magazine"--a videocassette featuring some of America's best-known poets reading and discussing their work. The mail-order "magazine" is the brainchild of New York actor Norman Rose, whose enthusiasm is palpable in his filmed introduction to the first edition.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Banished from his beloved Florence in 1302, Dante Alighieri knew what it was like to be flung into the outer circles of darkness. Dante's enduring sense of loss richly informs Robert Scanlan's staging of "The Inferno," which closed Sunday after a three-day run at the Getty Center's Harold M. Williams Auditorium. But Dante's vibrant humanism, the sheer sweep and vulgarity of his epic vision, largely eludes Scanlan and his cast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1992 | BOB ELSTON
Before launching into "Finlandia" by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius,the tuxedo-clad musicians seated in the back row of the brass section hoisted their French horns skyward, appearing more like members of a marching band than a symphony orchestra. But there was good reason for unusual lack of decorum. Many of the members of the audience had probably never seen a real French horn--or a cello, or a viola, or a bassoon, for that matter--and they wanted to be sure that everyone got a good look.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North American debut of contemporary dance company Ballet Preljocaj's "Romeo and Juliet," appearances by seminal 20th century music artists the Kronos Quartet and pianist Terry Riley, and the New York Philharmonic's first visit to Los Angeles since 1986 highlight the schedule for the UCLA Center for the Performing Arts 1998-1999 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a debate going on as to whether classical musicians should show more involvement when they play. One side feels that audiences would relate better to the music if they did. Classical music might even become more popular. The other side feels that music should be left to speak for itself, without any enhancement of personality.
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