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Robert Pinsky

ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1998
Movies "Star Trek: Insurrection" finds Capt. Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart, above with Donna Murphy) leading a mutiny when he discovers a conspiracy endangering a planet that is a virtual fountain of youth. The ninth "Star Trek" film opens Friday in general release. * "Shakespeare in Love" stars Joseph Fiennes as the struggling young playwright whose life and career are transformed when Gwyneth Paltrow's Viola auditions for his latest play. The movie opens Friday at selected theaters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1999 | FRANK TORREZ
Today "Today": Kitchen counters; 401(k) plans; John Lithgow; luggage, 5 a.m. KNBC. 717787 "America's Black Forum": The black elite, 1 p.m. KCAL. 15706 "America and the Courts": Memorial ceremony for former Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, 4 p.m. C-SPAN. 15446 "Larry King Weekend": Author Maureen Orth, 6 p.m. CNN. 426077 "McLaughlin Group": Kosovo; China, 6:30 p.m. KNBC. 597 Sunday "Today": Kickboxing; Lynn Redgrave, 6 a.m. KNBC.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | JEANNINE STEIN
Carol Muske-Dukes wants to show the world that poetry isn't just the lofty stuff studied in English lit classes. Muske-Dukes, a local poet, author and USC professor, is bringing poetry and the common man, woman and child together as part of a national Favorite Poem Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | PENELOPE MOFFET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Matching an art form of the ages with the technology of the '90s, an entrepreneur has come up with "Off the Page: The First Video Poetry Magazine"--a videocassette featuring some of America's best-known poets reading and discussing their work. The mail-order "magazine" is the brainchild of New York actor Norman Rose, whose enthusiasm is palpable in his filmed introduction to the first edition.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Banished from his beloved Florence in 1302, Dante Alighieri knew what it was like to be flung into the outer circles of darkness. Dante's enduring sense of loss richly informs Robert Scanlan's staging of "The Inferno," which closed Sunday after a three-day run at the Getty Center's Harold M. Williams Auditorium. But Dante's vibrant humanism, the sheer sweep and vulgarity of his epic vision, largely eludes Scanlan and his cast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1992 | BOB ELSTON
Before launching into "Finlandia" by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius,the tuxedo-clad musicians seated in the back row of the brass section hoisted their French horns skyward, appearing more like members of a marching band than a symphony orchestra. But there was good reason for unusual lack of decorum. Many of the members of the audience had probably never seen a real French horn--or a cello, or a viola, or a bassoon, for that matter--and they wanted to be sure that everyone got a good look.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North American debut of contemporary dance company Ballet Preljocaj's "Romeo and Juliet," appearances by seminal 20th century music artists the Kronos Quartet and pianist Terry Riley, and the New York Philharmonic's first visit to Los Angeles since 1986 highlight the schedule for the UCLA Center for the Performing Arts 1998-1999 season.
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