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Robert Pitofsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2000 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Hollywood, Robert Pitofsky must look like an authoritarian nightmare--the suspicious parent searching the room of his undisciplined teenager, flipping back the rugs, pulling out the drawers, hunting for something awful. As chairman of the powerful Federal Trade Commission, Pitofsky oversees the wide-ranging investigation into whether violent entertainment is intentionally marketed to children.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2000 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Hollywood, Robert Pitofsky must look like an authoritarian nightmare--the suspicious parent searching the room of his undisciplined teenager, flipping back the rugs, pulling out the drawers, hunting for something awful. As chairman of the powerful Federal Trade Commission, Pitofsky oversees the wide-ranging investigation into whether violent entertainment is intentionally marketed to children.
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NEWS
October 7, 1994 | Associated Press
Robert Pitofsky, a lawyer and law school professor, was nominated Thursday by President Clinton to be chairman of the Federal Trade Commission. Pitofsky, who is associated with the Washington firm of Arnold & Porter, served as an FTC commissioner in the Jimmy Carter Administration.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pitofsky Confirmed to Head FTC: The Senate gave the nod to the nomination of law school professor Robert Pitofsky to head the agency. Pitofsky, who could be sworn in as early as next week, takes over the Federal Trade Commission leadership from Republican Janet D. Steiger, who remains a member of the agency, which enforces business competition and consumer protection laws.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) is asking the Federal Trade Commission to investigate allegations that Chevron Corp. and Equilon, which markets the Shell brand, are trying to control gasoline prices by driving independent dealers out of business. In a letter sent Wednesday to FTC Chairman Robert Pitofsky, Boxer said hundreds of independents who lease stations from the companies have been pushed to the brink of bankruptcy.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2001
* Federal investigators found no evidence that oil companies conspired to gouge Midwestern motorists last summer, when pump prices in Chicago, Milwaukee and other cities rose above $2 per gallon. Investigators also concluded that the decline in gasoline prices after June was unrelated to the Federal Trade Commission's inquiry. The FTC investigation "uncovered no evidence of tacit or explicit collusion among market participants," the agency's chairman, Robert Pitofsky, wrote Rep. W.J.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. agreed to pay a $2.5-million civil penalty to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it didn't move quickly enough to sell hospitals in Utah and Florida, the agency said. The penalty is the product of a 1995 settlement that resolved FTC antitrust concerns over Columbia's $3.3-billion acquisition of Healthtrust Inc., the largest hospital combination ever. The FTC said the penalty is the second-largest ever for failure to divest on time.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FTC Urges Tighter Restrictions on Access to Personal Data: The federal agency has suggested that Congress amend the rules on who can obtain information such as Social Security numbers from consumer credit bureaus. The move follows an outpouring of consumer concern last week over reports that anyone with a credit card and a computer could easily track down such details through various online services.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | Reuters
Government antitrust regulators said the proposed national tobacco settlement would legalize price-fixing by tobacco companies and potentially add $123 billion to their profits over 25 years. "Hard-core price-fixing would ordinarily be treated criminally in the United States," Federal Trade Commission Chairman Robert Pitofsky told reporters, discussing a report by his staff.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission said some oil companies independently restricted supplies last year, contributing to gasoline price increases in Chicago, Milwaukee and elsewhere in the Midwest. In a nine-month investigation into why the price of a gallon of gas soared to more than $2, the FTC found that the companies hadn't colluded to raise prices but did act individually to increase profits.
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