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June 25, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
For a man whose voice launched thousands of would-be rock singers, former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant remains ingratiatingly humble. "I'm not exactly a musical talent," said Plant, 64, recently from his home in England. "I'm a singer, and I have a lot of bright ideas," he joked. Plant is far more comfortable moving forward with those new ideas than looking back at what the rest of the world sees as an incredible musical legacy in one of rock's most iconic bands. PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Since Zeppelin disbanded in 1980, Plant's launched projects far beyond his blues-rock beginnings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The thought of home movies of a trip abroad can elicit groans, unless they happen to be taken by somebody like Robert Plant. Using footage from a 2003 trip to Mali to take part in the Festival of the Desert, Plant  assembled an eight-episode documentary called "Zirka," which boasts a soundtrack that features Ali Farka Touré, Tinariwen and many others. Plant's images -- yes, he did the bulk of the filming himself -- capture the people and landscape of the African nation during a trip he describes in a statement as "a journey of revelation ... one of the most illuminating and humbling experiences of my life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The thought of home movies of a trip abroad can elicit groans, unless they happen to be taken by somebody like Robert Plant. Using footage from a 2003 trip to Mali to take part in the Festival of the Desert, Plant  assembled an eight-episode documentary called "Zirka," which boasts a soundtrack that features Ali Farka Touré, Tinariwen and many others. Plant's images -- yes, he did the bulk of the filming himself -- capture the people and landscape of the African nation during a trip he describes in a statement as "a journey of revelation ... one of the most illuminating and humbling experiences of my life.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Grace Potter found the perfect dress for her current tour -- a sparkly, silk sequined ankle-length Diane von Furstenberg gown with a generous leg slit and equally generous decolletage and voluminous half-butterfly sleeves -- quite by accident. "I actually bought it for a benefit I was going to," Potter told us backstage at the Shrine Auditorium on Wednesday night. "But I've ended up wearing it just about every night. The only time I haven't worn it in the last three weeks was when it was being dry-cleaned.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Robert Plant will bring his latest roots-music project, the Sensational Space Shifters, to the U.S. for the first time with a tour starting June 20 in Dallas. The 21 dates confirmed so far will span the country and take him to 15 states and is slated to go through July 27 in Brooklyn, N.Y., and stop at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles on June 26. The Sensational Space Shifters consist of six musicians whose collective resumes include stints with a disparate group of acts such as Sinead O'Connor, Tinariwen, Portishead and Massive Attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT
Competing with the ghost of yourself sounds like a scary proposition, but Robert Plant, who packed the Universal Amphitheatre on Monday, handles it quite nicely every time he stops on stage. Audiences don't go just to see Plant the solo singer. They're mainly interested in Plant the former lead vocalist of the great '70s British rock band Led Zeppelin. How does Plant measure up to his past? Quite well actually.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES ORANGE COUNTY POP MUSIC CRITIC
There are no second acts to American lives, said F. Scott Fitzgerald. He didn't say whether that also applied to the British. But for a curly-maned, banshee-voiced Brit named Robert Plant, Act Two has played out rather well. Plant's first act was a 12-year ride with Led Zeppelin, a band that redefined rock by putting pure sensation first and plain old sense a distant second, maybe ninth or tenth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | JOHN MILWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have been pop stars for decades, but last spring, when they set up to play alongside the street musicians at J'ma El F'na, the central market and nerve center of Marrakech, Morocco, they were strangers in a strange land. Unlike the other players, they weren't performing for tips.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1990 | Dennis Hunt
Nope, this isn't it. Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant still hasn't come up with that macho, hard-rock album Zep fans have been waiting for since the band called it quits a decade ago. His solo albums--this is his fifth since 1982--are like public dress rehearsals for the real thing. His last one, 1988's "Now and Zen," was a disjointed, dissonant mess, wandering all over the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | John Carucci, Associated Press
Do rock stars really need to learn how to scream? It's doubtful Robert Plant needed coaching to shriek "baaaaay-beeeeey" or that Zack de la Rocha ever needed a lesson. But regardless of natural talent, Melissa Cross, the self-proclaimed "Queen of Scream," has developed a training program that teaches proper technique to a new breed of unrestrained rock singers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
For a man whose voice launched thousands of would-be rock singers, former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant remains ingratiatingly humble. "I'm not exactly a musical talent," said Plant, 64, recently from his home in England. "I'm a singer, and I have a lot of bright ideas," he joked. Plant is far more comfortable moving forward with those new ideas than looking back at what the rest of the world sees as an incredible musical legacy in one of rock's most iconic bands. PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Since Zeppelin disbanded in 1980, Plant's launched projects far beyond his blues-rock beginnings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Robert Plant will bring his latest roots-music project, the Sensational Space Shifters, to the U.S. for the first time with a tour starting June 20 in Dallas. The 21 dates confirmed so far will span the country and take him to 15 states and is slated to go through July 27 in Brooklyn, N.Y., and stop at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles on June 26. The Sensational Space Shifters consist of six musicians whose collective resumes include stints with a disparate group of acts such as Sinead O'Connor, Tinariwen, Portishead and Massive Attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2013 | By Todd Martens
Gotye's inescapable "Somebody That I Used to Know" featuring Kimbra won the Grammy for record of the year. The song, released in mid-2011, peaked in 2012 and has sold more than 7 million downloads in the U.S., according to Nielsen SoundScan.  "Somebody That I Used to Know" introduced Gotye to American audiences, but the artist, whose real name is  Wouter de Backer, has released several albums and had success in Australia before the release of...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Award shows typically manufacture their "anything can happen" aura, but on Sunday night the 51st annual Grammy Awards delivered the real thing with canceled performances, a star nominee in police custody, a lingering song-theft controversy and the unforgettable sight of British-born star M.I.A., a nine-months-pregnant single mom-to-be, prancing across the stage on her due date. Oh, and there were some trophies handed out.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2008 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
The genre of pop standards is a bit out of bounds for Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, whose high-profile collaboration excavates a more traditional sector of America's musical geography. But when the singers and their band came to the Greek Theatre on Monday, there was something of "The Wizard of Oz" about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, two singers who hail from wildly different districts on the pop music landscape, announced Friday the upcoming release of "Raising Sand," an album that finds them col- laborating with the guidance of Grammy-winning producer T Bone Burnett. Plant, of course, was a sort of caterwauling demigod on the 1970s rock scene with Led Zeppelin, an act that ranks fourth on the all-time list of album sellers (only the Beatles, Elvis Presley and Garth Brooks top Zeppelin's 109.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
*** Robert Plant, "Fate of Nations," Es Paranza. It's refreshing to hear a rock demigod avoid getting trapped in that boxed set of mind. Maybe all the pressure to fall in with Jimmy Page and fly the Zep again has spurred Plant to show that he's no candidate for rock's all-too-spacious Jurassic Park. He has responded with a warmly emotional, musically adventurous album that sparkles with mature craftsmanship, yet sharpens enough hard edges to remind you where he came from.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Plant and Jimmy Page may have waited past the point of anticlimax to reteam, but it may be that anticlimactic aura that's part of the appeal of their unassumingly enjoyable MTV special tonight. The former Led Zeppelin leaders' 90-minute "one-time reunion" show, popularly billed as "Jimmy Page/Robert Plant (Unledded)"--or, as it's identified in the title cards, "No Quarter"--seems less like forced event-programming reanimation than a casual resumption between fated consorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | John Carucci, Associated Press
Do rock stars really need to learn how to scream? It's doubtful Robert Plant needed coaching to shriek "baaaaay-beeeeey" or that Zack de la Rocha ever needed a lesson. But regardless of natural talent, Melissa Cross, the self-proclaimed "Queen of Scream," has developed a training program that teaches proper technique to a new breed of unrestrained rock singers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2005 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
In "Tin Pan Valley," a new song Robert Plant offered Sunday at the Greek Theatre outlining his effort to escape the pull of nostalgia, the former Led Zeppelin front man sang "My peers may flirt with cabaret, some fake the rebel yell." A not-so-veiled reference to Rod Stewart and stuck-in-the-past veterans, it might have been the key line of the evening, but it was easy to miss because it was one of the few understated moments in the nearly two-hour show.
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