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Robert Prenter

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NEWS
April 1, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it weren't for his uncle and his uncle's friends, Republican upstart Robert Prenter would have had a grand total of $450 in his campaign to unseat former Assembly Speaker Brian Setencich. But Prenter's uncle happens to be Edward Atsinger, owner of the largest chain of Christian-format radio stations in the nation and a founding member of one of the most aggressive and effective political action committees in the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998
The historic embarrassment of the November elections on the part of the Republican Party in California can be traced to one single event: the recall of Doris Allen. When Allen became speaker of the Assembly, state GOP Chairman Michael Schroeder, Assemblyman Curt Pringle and the other titular heads of the party conspired to dethrone her. They spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to recall a legislator who would have been term-limited out of office just 10 months later. This unbridled hatred and vindictiveness spread to Fresno as well, where state Sen. Rob Hurtt, Pringle and gang unseated Assemblyman Brian Setencich in the June 1996 primary by running Robert Prenter as a stealth candidate.
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NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this were his beloved game of basketball, the odds would be obvious: longshot at best, like sinking a 70-footer at the buzzer. Assemblyman Brian Setencich is running for reelection--but not in the usual way. To keep his job in the Legislature, the Fresno Republican must persuade voters to write in his name on their ballots when they go to the polls Nov. 5. This is a Herculean task, one rarely accomplished in the annals of state political history.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this were his beloved game of basketball, the odds would be obvious: longshot at best, like sinking a 70-footer at the buzzer. Assemblyman Brian Setencich is running for reelection--but not in the usual way. To keep his job in the Legislature, the Fresno Republican must persuade voters to write in his name on their ballots when they go to the polls Nov. 5. This is a Herculean task, one rarely accomplished in the annals of state political history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998
The historic embarrassment of the November elections on the part of the Republican Party in California can be traced to one single event: the recall of Doris Allen. When Allen became speaker of the Assembly, state GOP Chairman Michael Schroeder, Assemblyman Curt Pringle and the other titular heads of the party conspired to dethrone her. They spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to recall a legislator who would have been term-limited out of office just 10 months later. This unbridled hatred and vindictiveness spread to Fresno as well, where state Sen. Rob Hurtt, Pringle and gang unseated Assemblyman Brian Setencich in the June 1996 primary by running Robert Prenter as a stealth candidate.
OPINION
February 13, 2005
Re "More Students Show Fluency in English," Feb. 9: The article leaves out the most important reason more students are fluent in English: the proposition passed by voters banning bilingual education. By teaching them in English, they actually have to learn it. Robert Prenter San Francisco
NEWS
June 3, 1996
Assemblyman Brian Setencich of Fresno, defeated in a stunning Republican primary election upset, says he is strongly leaning toward a write-in candidacy to retain his seat this fall. But there is no certainty he will remain a Republican if he is elected in a write-in candidacy, which carries no party affiliation, Setencich said after a brief address to the state conference of the Reform Party over the weekend. "I haven't decided," he told reporters on Saturday.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maverick GOP Assemblyman Brian Setencich, narrowly defeated by a March primary opponent backed by major Republican contributors, announced Wednesday that he will wage a write-in campaign this fall to keep his seat. The party dissident from Fresno, who briefly served last year as Assembly speaker, said "people were fooled" into voting for his opponent, political unknown Robert Prenter Jr. In running as a write-in candidate, Setencich has set up a rematch with Prenter in November.
NEWS
March 28, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Brian Setencich, the rookie GOP lawmaker who was elected Assembly speaker last year after siding with the Democrats, was the only incumbent to lose a bid for reelection. His brief political career was cut short after the state Republican Party and other activists targeted him for defeat in Tuesday's primary after Setencich made what a fellow GOP lawmaker called a "deal with the devil."
BUSINESS
December 12, 1997 | Capitol Alert News Service
State health officials are starting to have second thoughts about paying businesses, nonprofit organizations and others for every eligible child they sign up for the state's new health insurance program aimed at providing coverage for children.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it weren't for his uncle and his uncle's friends, Republican upstart Robert Prenter would have had a grand total of $450 in his campaign to unseat former Assembly Speaker Brian Setencich. But Prenter's uncle happens to be Edward Atsinger, owner of the largest chain of Christian-format radio stations in the nation and a founding member of one of the most aggressive and effective political action committees in the state.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Speaker Curt Pringle unceremoniously yanked maverick Republican Brian Setencich off a committee Thursday after the Fresno freshman helped Democrats defeat a trio of privatization bills that top the GOP agenda. At the behest of Pringle, a GOP conservative from Garden Grove, Republicans on the Assembly Rules Committee voted to pull Setencich and Democrat Assemblyman Wally Knox of Los Angeles off the Local Government Committee.
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