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Robert Prosky

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1996 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twinkly-eyed Robert Prosky has one of those faces that can be cuddly and avuncular one minute and gravitas incarnate the next. A seasoned performer who's been in more than 150 plays ranging from classic drama to light comedy, he can change personas in an instant. And yet after 50 years of acting, Prosky still prefers to do extensive character research--and not only the kind that involves books. Rather, his favorite texts are other people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Bernstein writes for the Washington Post, where this obituary first appeared.
Robert Prosky, a character actor with hundreds of film, TV and stage credits, and whose roles included an avuncular sergeant on the NBC police drama "Hill Street Blues" and a desperate real estate salesman in David Mamet's play "Glengarry Glen Ross," has died. He was 77. Prosky died Monday at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C., of complications from a heart procedure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Bernstein writes for the Washington Post, where this obituary first appeared.
Robert Prosky, a character actor with hundreds of film, TV and stage credits, and whose roles included an avuncular sergeant on the NBC police drama "Hill Street Blues" and a desperate real estate salesman in David Mamet's play "Glengarry Glen Ross," has died. He was 77. Prosky died Monday at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C., of complications from a heart procedure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1996 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twinkly-eyed Robert Prosky has one of those faces that can be cuddly and avuncular one minute and gravitas incarnate the next. A seasoned performer who's been in more than 150 plays ranging from classic drama to light comedy, he can change personas in an instant. And yet after 50 years of acting, Prosky still prefers to do extensive character research--and not only the kind that involves books. Rather, his favorite texts are other people.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1988
"A Walk in the Woods," Lee Blessing's La Jolla Playhouse hit about arms negotiations, is about to receive new life in Great Britain, the Soviet Union and the United States. The Tony-nominated show, which closed June 26 on Broadway, will reopen Oct. 24 at the Comedy Theater in London's West End. Alec Guinness will portray the Soviet negotiator and Edward Herrman will be his American counterpart. Ronald Eyre will direct.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1996
Actor Robert Prosky's observations about his profession ("An Inventor of Historic Character," July 20) brings to mind a personal experience that might be of value to the many actors who peruse your pages. Some years ago I spent a month in Washington, D.C., directing a series of "industrial" films for the Navy. Though most industry people regard this field with disdain if not outright contempt, dramatized industrials often call for a level of performance exceeding that of TV or movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1990 | RAY LOYND
A chaste adult love story on network TV, especially when the characters are in their 60s, doesn't come along very often. But "The Love She Sought," co-starring Angela Lansbury and Denholm Elliott, is comparatively adventurous prime-time programming. It airs Sunday at 8 on Channels 4, 36 and 39. The characters probably fantasize about sex, but they've been celibate too long to worry about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | David Pecchia \f7
The Freshman (Tri-Star). Shooting in New York and Toronto. Marlon Brando returns in his first leading role since 1980's "The Formula." In this offbeat comedy, Matthew Broderick plays a college freshman who's befriended by genial father figure (and organized crime leader) Brando and his eligible daughter. Producer Mike Lobell. Director/screenwriter Andrew Bergman. Gremlins II (Amblin/Warner Bros.). Shooting in New York and L.A. Cutesy couple Zach Galligan and Phoebe Cates return in this sequel to the 1984 smash.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"The Great Outdoors" (citywide) is about as much fun as ants at a picnic for anyone over the age of 10. It's a crass, blah comedy about summer vacation perils that teams Dan Aykroyd and John Candy, but gives them next to nothing to work with. If the prolific and profit-making John Hughes weren't the writer--as well as the co-executive producer--of this scattershot nonsense directed frenetically by Howard Deutch, it's hard to imagine the film getting made, let alone attracting Aykroyd and Candy.
SPORTS
December 22, 1999 | HOUSTON MITCHELL
What: "Rudy" Price: $9.95 "Rudy," released in 1993, is the type of movie you have to talk people into watching. I have owned a copy for years, and when people looking through my collection notice that it's a movie about a kid who wants to play football for Notre Dame, they quickly put it back. So I tell them to take it home and watch it at at their leisure. A few days later it's returned, with the message: "Thanks for making me take that movie with me. It was great."
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
THE SHOW: The movie: "Far and Away." THE SETUP: Impoverished Irish farmer Joseph Donelly (Tom Cruise, pictured) and wealthy landowner's daughter Shannon Christie (Nicole Kidman, pictured) hook up in the most unlikely fashion and cross the Atlantic toward the great Oklahoma land rush of the late 19th Century. THE LOOK: On the dowdy side. Costume designer Joanna Johnston has Kidman's Shannon, a feisty young lass, all done up like a dowager.
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