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Robert R Prechter

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BUSINESS
October 8, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Robert R. Prechter again demonstrated this week why he is considered one of the nation's most influential stock market forecasters. His prediction Monday that the market was due for a sharp correction helped spark Tuesday's record 91.55-point drop in the Dow Jones average of industrial stocks. Similar forecasts during the past year also preceded sharp market declines.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Robert R. Prechter again demonstrated this week why he is considered one of the nation's most influential stock market forecasters. His prediction Monday that the market was due for a sharp correction helped spark Tuesday's record 91.55-point drop in the Dow Jones average of industrial stocks. Similar forecasts during the past year also preceded sharp market declines.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Has the bear awakened from its five-year hibernation, or is the bull still alive? That, of course, is the ultimate question confronting investors in the wake of this week's record 235.48-point plunge in the Dow Jones industrial index, a decline of 9.5% for the week and 17.5% since the Dow's record peak on Aug. 25. Unfortunately, however, professional market watchers provide no clear-cut consensus. Some still believe that the 5-year-old bull is alive although aging.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The stock market's January rally roared with new life Thursday after a one-day breather, lifting the Dow Jones industrial average a record 51.60 points to 2,145.67. Trading was heavy, at 188.66 million shares, even though many businesses closed early because of a fierce East Coast snowstorm, and the advance was the market's 14th in the last 15 trading days. The Dow has gained 249.72 points during that period, adding 13.2% to its value. The daily point gain increased the Dow index's value 2.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Nervous investors, focusing on negative economic news instead of long-awaited cuts in overseas interest rates, on Thursday sent the Dow Jones industrial average reeling to its lowest level since the Oct. 19 crash, renewing fears of further sharp declines. The 72.44-point plunge, to a close of 1,776.53, represented a drop of 3.92% and was the ninth-biggest single-day point loss ever.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | Bill Sing, Times Staff Writer
Bulls and bears often don't see eye to eye. But there is one thing many of them agree on: Investing in stocks these days is getting riskier and riskier. With the bull market well into its fifth year--during which the Dow Jones average of industrial stocks tripled in value--further stock gains will be harder and harder to come by, many experts say.
NEWS
October 7, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Fears of rising interest rates and pessimistic forecasts by some leading market analysts prompted a major sell-off in the stock market Tuesday, with the Dow Jones average of 30 industrial stocks falling 91.55 points, its biggest one-day point drop ever. The fall in the Dow, to a close of 2,548.63, was yet another indication of how investor uncertainty has triggered sharp point swings in that key market index.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1987 | JOHN TRAIN, JOHN TRAIN is the author of, among other books, "Famous Financial Fiascos," "The Money Masters" and most recently, "The Midas Touch: The Investment Genius of Warren Buffett." He also is president of Train, Smith Investment Counsel in New York
You can identify several typical stages in a major market movement. In this case, let's start with when the market was at its top late last summer. The cry is (1): "Stocks can only go up." This time, the prediction of 3,600 for the Dow Jones industrial index by everybody's favorite technician, Robert R. Prechter Jr., gave the investing public a convenient target.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
In October, 1929, following the Great Crash, President Herbert Hoover told the nation that the economy was fundamentally sound. Stocks, after a brief slump, rallied over the next few months and made up nearly half of their losses from the crash. In October, 1987, following the latest Great Crash, President Reagan too told the nation that the economy was fundamentally sound.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
Long ago, J. P. Morgan was asked what he thought the stock market would do. "It will fluctuate," he replied. But in 1987, the market did more than just fluctuate; 50-point daily swings in the Dow Jones industrial average eventually became ho-hum events. As 1987 dawned, despite a 4-year-old bull market, there was general optimism that the good times would continue.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
As director of futures research for the Paine Webber brokerage, Jack Schwager has studied super bull markets in gold, sugar and other commodities over the years and contends that there is a consistent pattern in each of them. All such bull markets, he says, are followed by drastic bear markets. And stocks, he contends, behave no differently.
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