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Robert Raben

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NEWS
August 18, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Words are a powerful tool in this city. They can be used to praise or to clobber, to goad or to dissemble. And sometimes, as Robert Raben found out recently, they can come back to haunt you. Especially when you're relying on Congress to sign off on your next job. Raben, a soft-spoken lawyer from Miami, wants to be confirmed by the Senate as an assistant attorney general. He's a popular guy on Capitol Hill after spending several years as a Democratic aide.
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NEWS
July 18, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consider it further proof of the law of unintended consequences. Aiming to prevent unethical conduct, Congress last year passed a law requiring federal prosecutors to abide by the ethics rules of the state bar where they are conducting investigations. Instead, the Justice Department says, the move has hampered law enforcement in cases related to public safety--among them the investigation of the maintenance and safety practices of Alaska Airlines.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Eric H. Holder Jr. was sworn in as attorney general four years ago with probably more on-the-job training, credentials and expertise than any of the 81 others who have run the Justice Department. He joined its Public Integrity Section as a trial lawyer fresh out of law school, and later served as a federal judge and U.S. attorney in Washington. By the late 1990s, he was deputy attorney general. Sworn in for the top post in February 2009, Holder seemed made for the job. But what many supporters and critics say he did not bring to the office - which oversees 110,000 employees, undercover terrorism investigations, anti-drug efforts against Mexican cartels, public corruption prosecutions and civil and financial matters - is what may go down as his legacy.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city is a swamp on the night before the House recess. Wilting, soggy lawmakers slouch through the clutching humidity and 90-plus temperatures, eager for the relief of the Capitol's air-conditioned chill. The exception is Andrea Sheldon, quick-stepping it across the Hill in a short melon crepe dress, ear baubles in rhythm and Amerige by Givenchy in the air.
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