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Robert Radnitz

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
A former English teacher named Robert Radnitz has produced some of Hollywood's most distinguished family films, including "A Dog of Flanders" (his first), "Island of the Blue Dolphins," "Misty" and the much-honored "Sounder" in 1972. Sex, violence and mayhem generally do not loom large in his output, even in his more mature-themed works such as "Birch Interval" and "Cross Creek," his adaptation of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' autobiographical stories.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010
A memorial service will be held July 27 for Robert B. Radnitz, a movie producer who received an Academy Award nomination for best picture for "Sounder." Radnitz, 85, died June 6 from complications of a stroke. The service, open to those who worked with and admired Radnitz, will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater, 1313 N. Vine St., Hollywood. For more information, call (310) 374-3737.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Leonard Klady \f7
How did producer Robert Radnitz ("Sounder," "Cross Creek") manage to get the rights to the late Willa Cather's "Oh, Pioneers"? Following a film adaptation of her novel "A Lost Lady" in 1934, she decided never to allow another one of her books to be filmed--a stipulation in her will when she died in 1947. "I was first aware of this when I tried to get Cather's 'Death Comes to the Archbishop' in the 1950s," Radnitz told us. "Over the years I'd inquire about one book or another but the answer was always a polite no."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert B. Radnitz, an English teacher turned movie producer who made some of Hollywood's more distinguished family fare, including "Sounder" and "Island of the Blue Dolphins," has died. He was 85. Radnitz died Sunday at his Malibu home from complications of a stroke he had years ago, said his wife, Pearl. With the release of his first film in 1959 – the boy-and-his-dog tale "A Dog of Flanders" – Radnitz started to develop a reputation as a maker of high-quality movies for children and their parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010
A memorial service will be held July 27 for Robert B. Radnitz, a movie producer who received an Academy Award nomination for best picture for "Sounder." Radnitz, 85, died June 6 from complications of a stroke. The service, open to those who worked with and admired Radnitz, will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater, 1313 N. Vine St., Hollywood. For more information, call (310) 374-3737.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert B. Radnitz, an English teacher turned movie producer who made some of Hollywood's more distinguished family fare, including "Sounder" and "Island of the Blue Dolphins," has died. He was 85. Radnitz died Sunday at his Malibu home from complications of a stroke he had years ago, said his wife, Pearl. With the release of his first film in 1959 – the boy-and-his-dog tale "A Dog of Flanders" – Radnitz started to develop a reputation as a maker of high-quality movies for children and their parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1990
I agree with Robert Radnitz (Counterpunch, July 23) that reform of an absolute and arbitrary ratings code is needed to allow depiction of the most intimate aspects of human life with compassion and sensitivity. Our filmmakers should be able to depict human sexuality frankly and decently, without fear that their work will be condemned implicitly as pornographic through a questionable and misguided X rating. I think it is absurd to believe that portrayal of the nude in film is obscene.
NEWS
April 11, 1993
Kevin Thomas, in his Prime-Time Flicks column (TV Times, March 14), once again proved his fine sensibilities when he referred to "The Quiet Man" as "John Ford's glorious 1952 romantic comedy." Film buffs may be interested in knowing that the young man in the accompanying still from the film, kissing Maureen O'Hara, is in fact O'Hara's real-life brother, Charles FitzSimons. Robert B. Radnitz, Culver City
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992
Michele Willens' overview of notable political motion pictures and television shows, both past and upcoming, was most interesting and timely ("Jumping on the Bandwagon," Aug. 27). However, there are a number of seminal films she has failed to mention: "All the King's Men" (1949): Robert Rossen's brilliant adaptation and direction of Robert Penn Warren's novel received the 1949 Academy Award for best picture and Oscars for Broderick Crawford and Mercedes McCambridge. "The Great McGinty" (1940)
BOOKS
November 8, 1992
History is weird. You have to wonder how Robert Radnitz (Letters, Aug. 23) could make a successful movie of "Island of the Blue Dolphins" without completely understanding the story of the "Lost Woman" of San Nicholas Island. The so-called "Lost Woman" was baptized conditionally, as Juana Maria, on her deathbed by Father Francisco Sanchez. She may not have been Chumash, for local Indians could not understand her lingo. Her language may have been Shoshonean or Kodiak. In 1811, an American sea captain under contract to the Russian American Co. placed Kodiaks on San Nicholas Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
A former English teacher named Robert Radnitz has produced some of Hollywood's most distinguished family films, including "A Dog of Flanders" (his first), "Island of the Blue Dolphins," "Misty" and the much-honored "Sounder" in 1972. Sex, violence and mayhem generally do not loom large in his output, even in his more mature-themed works such as "Birch Interval" and "Cross Creek," his adaptation of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' autobiographical stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Leonard Klady \f7
How did producer Robert Radnitz ("Sounder," "Cross Creek") manage to get the rights to the late Willa Cather's "Oh, Pioneers"? Following a film adaptation of her novel "A Lost Lady" in 1934, she decided never to allow another one of her books to be filmed--a stipulation in her will when she died in 1947. "I was first aware of this when I tried to get Cather's 'Death Comes to the Archbishop' in the 1950s," Radnitz told us. "Over the years I'd inquire about one book or another but the answer was always a polite no."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
Orange County continued to play a role in movie and television production, with the county and various cities issuing more than 100 shooting permits. The 1990 total for unincorporated areas of the county alone ran well ahead of 1989, according to Lolly Powell, the county's film liaison. Productions using the county as a scenic backdrop ran the gamut from big budget to B movies, commercials to student films. "Defending Your Life," a Warner Bros.
NEWS
April 4, 1987
As a former Easterner, as well as an old-time movie buff, I do want to say how taken I was with Sam Hall Kaplan's "Los Angeles: The City as a Movie Studio" (March 7). However, and in proof that the filmic memory sometimes outdistances the fact, Kaplan's remarks as to MGM, "There behind the gates was created the Rome of 'Ben Hur,' the Mississippi of 'Meet Me in St. Louis,' the Pacific on which the crew of the Bounty mutinied, David Copperfield's London, Gene Kelly's Paris and, perhaps the most memorable, the Land of Oz," are inaccurate.
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