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Robert Rahway Zakanitch

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September 7, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Robert Rahway Zakanitch is a burly guy, but he appears dwarfed by his own 11-by-30-foot paintings at the Patricia Faure Gallery. The "Big Bungalow Suite," as he calls his latest work, is his answer to the stubbornly recurrent question in late 20th century art: "Is painting dead?" As Zakanitch stands next to his painted tapestry of giant hibiscus, tendrils and silkworms, his shaggy white eyebrows shoot up when he says, "It seems like this whole century has been a conspiracy to eliminate beauty.
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September 7, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Robert Rahway Zakanitch is a burly guy, but he appears dwarfed by his own 11-by-30-foot paintings at the Patricia Faure Gallery. The "Big Bungalow Suite," as he calls his latest work, is his answer to the stubbornly recurrent question in late 20th century art: "Is painting dead?" As Zakanitch stands next to his painted tapestry of giant hibiscus, tendrils and silkworms, his shaggy white eyebrows shoot up when he says, "It seems like this whole century has been a conspiracy to eliminate beauty.
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September 26, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No Wallflower: "Apocalyptic Wallpaper" was a term famously coined by critic Harold Rosenberg in the 1950s to describe paintings that failed because the artists who made them didn't manage to get enough of their selves (or their souls) onto the canvas.
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