Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Rauschenberg
IN THE NEWS

Robert Rauschenberg

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1998
"When I first came to Los Angeles, I was in the Navy, and I thought, this town is great. It's like they built it around a railroad, but the train didn't come in," artist Robert Rauschenberg said, dredging up a 55-year-old memory as he perused a vast array of color photographs of the city, to be used in a new edition of prints.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Sunset Canyon Amphitheatre, at the northwest corner of the UCLA campus, is not exactly the wilds. The bleachers overlook a recreation center's grassy knoll and a swimming pool in the distance. Still, the amphitheater is hidden away and, thanks to UCLA's parking militia, mildly inaccessible to the public. If that touch of trouble and remove helped make Sunset Canyon an enchanted, although challenging, venue Thursday night for Trisha Brown's "Astral Converted," it also helped remind us just how radically times have changed over the last two decades.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Mary Lynn Kotz's 1990 book "Rauschenberg: Art and Life" includes two photographs of Robert Rauschenberg as a child that suggest he arrived with his greatest gifts in full bloom. One image depicts him at 18 months, gazing into the camera as he sits alone on a lawn; the other shows him at 12, surrounded by a litter of puppies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Sometimes bigger is better when buying art by committee. At this year's Collectors Committee weekend, the L.A. County Museum of Art bought $2.5-million worth of artwork to add to its permanent collection, including two larger-than-life works: a 60-foot-long Robert Rauschenberg screenprint that shows a collage of newspaper articles from 1970, bought for $775,000, and a nearly 10-foot-tall elevator surround that Louis Sullivan designed around 1892 for...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
In addition to critical accolades, "Robert Rauschenberg: Combines" -- an international traveling exhibition organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art's chief curator Paul Schimmel and currently on view at MOCA -- has garnered two national awards. The Assn. of Art Museum Curators recently cited "Rauschenberg" as one of 2005's four most outstanding exhibitions nationwide.
NEWS
May 18, 2006
In the 1950s, artist Robert Rauschenberg pioneered Combines, three-dimensional collage incorporating found objects, painting and sculpture that would influence a generation of artists while irking contemporary Abstract Expressionists. His fearlessness in rejecting notions of serious art paved the way to Pop art, earning him the often-referenced label as the first postmodern artist. "Robert Rauschenberg: Combines" is devoted to his groundbreaking works.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Palimony Problems: Famed artist Robert Rauschenberg, 65, is named in a $65-million palimony suit filed by a man claiming he had an intimate relationship with him for 22 years and collaborated on his works. Claiming a breach of contract, William Edwin Van Brunt III, 42, said he received no compensation or credit for his contribution. The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Manhattan seeks $65 million, legal costs and 361 artworks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN
An accident has forced artist Robert Rauschenberg to cancel his appearance at a major fund-raising event for the Orange County Museum of Art. Rauschenberg, 76, was scheduled to accept an achievement award Sunday during the "Art of Dining XIV." His longtime friend, Sidney Felsen, who co-founded the famed Gemini G.E.L. printmaking studio in Los Angeles, will accept the honor in his place. Rauschenberg underwent surgery this week for a leg injury.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | From Associated Press
Authorities seized 15 works by artist Robert Rauschenberg and threatened to sell them if he does not pay $5.5 million owed to an art dealer. The pieces were taken Friday night from a display at the Menil Collection in Houston. They were part of "Robert Rauschenberg: A Retrospective," a traveling exhibit of more than 300 works being featured at Houston's three art museums. A Travis County court ruled in September that Rauschenberg and business associates must pay $5.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Robert Meyerhoff, a Baltimore philanthropist who has one of the world's outstanding collections of post-World War II paintings, has received approval to turn his Maryland estate into a museum that will be part of the National Gallery of Art. The Phoenix, Md., estate, north of Baltimore and 65 miles from the National Gallery in Washington, would be the first permanent location off the national Mall for works in the museum's collection. It will open to the public upon the death of Meyerhoff, who is 84. In 1987 Meyerhoff and his wife, Jane, pledged to give their collection of 265 works to the gallery, including pieces by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and Ellsworth Kelly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cy Twombly, an internationally renowned American artist whose lyrically evocative signature works blur the boundaries of painting, drawing and handwritten poetry, has died. He was 83. Twombly died Tuesday in Rome, where he had spent much of his time since the late 1950s. The cause of death was not immediately known, but he had suffered from cancer, the Associated Press reported. An independent figure who likened his art to an encapsulation of the creative experience, Twombly was sometimes dismissed as a minor talent or disparaged as a doodler whose loosely fashioned images, loopy texts and skeins of colored line looked too easy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, an Italian collector of American art whose cache of paintings and sculptures by Mark Rothko, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and others legitimized the fledgling Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, has died. He was 87. Panza died Friday night in Milan, said MOCA spokeswoman Lyn Winter. No cause was announced. Panza became the first European collector of postwar American art. He was able to connect the dots in a new American aesthetic, playing a large role in promoting Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism and Conceptual art, as well as catapulting Los Angeles artists to international credibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
Robert Rauschenberg, the protean artist from small-town Texas whose imaginative commitment to hybrid forms of painting and sculpture changed the course of American and European art, died Monday night after a brief illness at his home on Captiva Island, Fla., according to New York's PaceWildenstein Gallery, which represents his work. He was 82 and had been in poor health for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Robert Meyerhoff, a Baltimore philanthropist who has one of the world's outstanding collections of post-World War II paintings, has received approval to turn his Maryland estate into a museum that will be part of the National Gallery of Art. The Phoenix, Md., estate, north of Baltimore and 65 miles from the National Gallery in Washington, would be the first permanent location off the national Mall for works in the museum's collection. It will open to the public upon the death of Meyerhoff, who is 84. In 1987 Meyerhoff and his wife, Jane, pledged to give their collection of 265 works to the gallery, including pieces by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and Ellsworth Kelly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
In addition to critical accolades, "Robert Rauschenberg: Combines" -- an international traveling exhibition organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art's chief curator Paul Schimmel and currently on view at MOCA -- has garnered two national awards. The Assn. of Art Museum Curators recently cited "Rauschenberg" as one of 2005's four most outstanding exhibitions nationwide.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 2006 | Gary Garrels, Gary Garrels is senior curator at the Hammer Museum.
Choosing a few pieces to represent Mark Bradford's oeuvre is not easy. He works in a wide range of forms, including photography, video, sculpture and site-specific installations, but ultimately I focused on his extraordinary collages. They bristle with energy, evoking the cacophonous, edgy urban environment that is contemporary L.A. They dazzle the eye with flickering color set in undulating, expansive fields, kaleidoscopic reminders of how quickly the terrain of the city shifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
ON Dec. 7, 1992, the New York Philharmonic celebrated its 150th anniversary by unveiling a poster it had commissioned from Robert Rauschenberg. An attractive, if slightly innocuous, silk-screen collage, it is instantly recognizable as a Rauschenberg. In the center sits a large pale rose, its stem coming out of a couple of earthy, painted-over brass instruments. On top is a lopsided keyboard. The poster enhances the lobby of Avery Fisher Hall, which needs all the visual help it can get.
OPINION
May 21, 2006 | Leo J. O'Donovan, LEO J. O'DONOVAN is a Catholic priest, theologian and president emeritus of Georgetown University. He's a frequent contributor of art criticism to various national publications.
ROBERT Rauschenberg is such a prolific and inventive artist that you can enter his world -- or better, discover the world you share with him -- through countless doors. For me, it happened Sept. 20, 1997, the day after his great, sprawling retrospective at New York's Guggenheim Museum opened.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|