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Robert Reischauer

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BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Congressional Budget Office warned Tuesday that tax cuts probably would not strengthen the recovery, while the nation's purchasing managers and a key Federal Reserve official indicated that a "double-dip" recession is unlikely next year. In testimony before the House Budget Committee, CBO Director Robert Reischauer said cutting taxes to fight the economic downturn could reduce long-term prospects for growth because it would significantly increase the national deficit.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Greenstein, the director of a liberal Washington think tank, withdrew as a candidate for the deputy White House budget director's job on Friday, becoming the latest Democratic casualty of the Republicans' November landslide. Greenstein, the longtime director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, was offered the post as chief deputy to Budget Director Alice Rivlin before the November election.
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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Congressional Budget Office Director Robert D. Reischauer discovered at a recent hearing that his microphone at the witness table would not work, Senate Budget Committee Chairman Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) offered him one of the seats reserved for senators--on the Democratic side of the room. Before accepting, Reischauer hesitated, looked over at the Republican side of the committee and said: "I could sit at an empty seat over there, too."
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Congressional Budget Office Director Robert D. Reischauer discovered at a recent hearing that his microphone at the witness table would not work, Senate Budget Committee Chairman Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) offered him one of the seats reserved for senators--on the Democratic side of the room. Before accepting, Reischauer hesitated, looked over at the Republican side of the committee and said: "I could sit at an empty seat over there, too."
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Greenstein, the director of a liberal Washington think tank, withdrew as a candidate for the deputy White House budget director's job on Friday, becoming the latest Democratic casualty of the Republicans' November landslide. Greenstein, the longtime director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, was offered the post as chief deputy to Budget Director Alice Rivlin before the November election.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin Oldfather Reischauer, who served as U.S. ambassador to Japan during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, died Saturday of hepatitis. He was 79. Reischauer died at Green Hospital of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, the clinic said. Ambassador to Japan from 1961 to 1966, Reischauer wrote several books on Japan and on America's relationship with Japan and Asia. Among his books are "The Japanese Today: Change and Continuity," and "Japan: The Story of a Nation."
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Reischauer has a toy skunk in his office. Lift its tail, and what do you see? The letters C-B-O. CBO--the Congressional Budget Office--is used to being the skunk at Capitol Hill's picnic. Its job is to translate the lofty dreams of lawmakers into the hard currency of taxing and spending. And, in these days of perennial federal deficits, the numbers usually don't add up.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Congressional Budget Office said Thursday that the Clinton Administration's economic plan, reinforced by an improving economy, will largely end the budget deficit crisis for the rest of the decade.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the Congressional Budget Office bluntly warned Tuesday that the bank insurance fund will run out of money late this year and will need to borrow cash from the Treasury if it is to continue rescuing depositors in financially crippled banks. But CBO director Robert D. Reischauer said the banking industry, which supports the fund with annual premiums, should be able to repay such borrowing over the next five years, making a direct taxpayer bailout unnecessary.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Estimate Given on S&L Cleanup Cost: Robert Reischauer, director of the Congressional Budget Office, told a House Banking subcommittee that completing the cleanup of the nation's savings and loan industry will cost more than the $45 billion requested this week by Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen. About $50 billion will be needed to cover the expenses of the Resolution Trust Corp., the nation's thrift cleanup agency, and the Savings Assn. Insurance Fund between now and 1998, Reischauer said.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Congressional Budget Office said Thursday that the Clinton Administration's economic plan, reinforced by an improving economy, will largely end the budget deficit crisis for the rest of the decade.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Congressional Budget Office warned Tuesday that tax cuts probably would not strengthen the recovery, while the nation's purchasing managers and a key Federal Reserve official indicated that a "double-dip" recession is unlikely next year. In testimony before the House Budget Committee, CBO Director Robert Reischauer said cutting taxes to fight the economic downturn could reduce long-term prospects for growth because it would significantly increase the national deficit.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the Congressional Budget Office bluntly warned Tuesday that the bank insurance fund will run out of money late this year and will need to borrow cash from the Treasury if it is to continue rescuing depositors in financially crippled banks. But CBO director Robert D. Reischauer said the banking industry, which supports the fund with annual premiums, should be able to repay such borrowing over the next five years, making a direct taxpayer bailout unnecessary.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin Oldfather Reischauer, who served as U.S. ambassador to Japan during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, died Saturday of hepatitis. He was 79. Reischauer died at Green Hospital of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, the clinic said. Ambassador to Japan from 1961 to 1966, Reischauer wrote several books on Japan and on America's relationship with Japan and Asia. Among his books are "The Japanese Today: Change and Continuity," and "Japan: The Story of a Nation."
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Reischauer has a toy skunk in his office. Lift its tail, and what do you see? The letters C-B-O. CBO--the Congressional Budget Office--is used to being the skunk at Capitol Hill's picnic. Its job is to translate the lofty dreams of lawmakers into the hard currency of taxing and spending. And, in these days of perennial federal deficits, the numbers usually don't add up.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Congressional Budget Office predicted that the government will chalk up a record deficit of $298 billion this fiscal year, cautioning that the cost of the Persian Gulf War will drive the cash shortfall even higher. The budget office prediction is slightly less than the White House projection but significantly more than last year's shortfall. The congressional projection has jumped substantially since July, when it was $232 billion.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Congressional Democrats have named economist Robert D. Reischauer, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, to head the Congressional Budget Office. Reischauer, a former CBO official, is considered moderate and pragmatic by Democrats and Republicans. The CBO is expected to be a nonpartisan adviser, even though in this case its director was appointed by the leaders of a House and Senate that are both controlled by Democrats.
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