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Robert Richardson

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NEWS
December 16, 1997
OL SAN CLEMENTE SR. As the Tritons' center, the 6-3, 240-pound Richardson is a key reason San Clemente has averaged 4,000 yards of offense each of the past three seasons. "He was so quick we used him as a lead blocker on trap plays," Coach Mark McElroy said. "That's rare for a center."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013
Robert C. Richardson Won Nobel Prize for physics in 1996 Robert C. Richardson, 75, a Cornell University professor who shared a Nobel Prize for a key discovery in experimental physics, died Tuesday in Ithaca, N.Y., from complications of a heart attack, the university announced. He and fellow Cornell researchers David Lee and Douglas Osheroff were awarded the Nobel in 1996 for their 1971 work on extremely low-temperature physics involving the isotope helium-3. Their discovery demonstrated that the isotope became a "superfluid" that flows without friction, and it contributed to research ranging from the properties of microscopic matter to astrophysics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2000 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Richardson, a Los Angeles Times classified advertising messenger who volunteered his services to the news department during the 1965 Watts riots and became the newspaper's only black employee reporting on the rioting, died Friday at 59, family members said. He died in a West Los Angeles hospital of an asthma attack, his wife, Alice, said Sunday.
HOME & GARDEN
April 12, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Ed O'Neill of "Modern Family" has bought a Brentwood home from cinematographer Robert Richardson for $3.05 million. The ranch-style house was designed by Cliff May in 1953 as his personal residence. It was an experiment in open plan living, with walls enclosing only the bathrooms and long drapes and rolling cabinets defining other rooms. During Richardson's ownership, the home was restored and refined by L.A.-based Marmol Radziner. Walls of glass open to park-like grounds, and a 288-square-foot skylight brings natural light into the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Susan King
The nominees in the feature film category of the 24th annual American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement Awards announced Monday have a distinctly international flavor. The lone American -- Robert Richardson for "Inglourious Basterds" -- is joined by Briton Barry Ackroyd, who is nominated for "The Hurt Locker"; Aussie Dion Beebe, for "Nine"; Mauro Fiore of Italy, for "Avatar"; and Austrian Christian Berger for "The White Ribbon," the only black-and-white film in the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There are frequent complaints that the Academy Award telecast is too long. In fact, the agreement between the motion-picture academy and the ABC network stipulates that the show cannot be less than three hours long. How else to get in all those commercials. Still, there are suggestions that some of the "lesser" awards be sent by mail--a thought greeted by rightful indignation in the industry. What is Batman going to do without special effects, take the stairs?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Richardson is hanging around locations for "Heat Wave," a TV movie about those sweaty August nights nearly 25 years ago when the ghettos in South-Central L.A. exploded into a holocaust. It was called the Watts riots, although some people prefer "insurrection." Richardson, raised in the neighborhood, watched in horror as much of it was burned and pillaged. Then 24, he was working as a classified ad messenger for The Times.
REAL ESTATE
December 12, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Special to The Times
Actor Noah Wyle has sold his Los Feliz home for close to its $3.8-million asking price. The buyer was Robert Richardson, who won an Oscar in 1991 for best cinematography for "JFK." The house, which actor Tim Curry also once owned, is a restored Spanish colonial estate. It is on about 1.5 acres of lush grounds and has three bedrooms and 3 1/2 bathrooms in slightly more than 4,000 square feet. The home has hand-carved, hand-stenciled ceilings, a pool, an amphitheater, waterfalls and fountains.
HOME & GARDEN
April 12, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Ed O'Neill of "Modern Family" has bought a Brentwood home from cinematographer Robert Richardson for $3.05 million. The ranch-style house was designed by Cliff May in 1953 as his personal residence. It was an experiment in open plan living, with walls enclosing only the bathrooms and long drapes and rolling cabinets defining other rooms. During Richardson's ownership, the home was restored and refined by L.A.-based Marmol Radziner. Walls of glass open to park-like grounds, and a 288-square-foot skylight brings natural light into the house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013
Robert C. Richardson Won Nobel Prize for physics in 1996 Robert C. Richardson, 75, a Cornell University professor who shared a Nobel Prize for a key discovery in experimental physics, died Tuesday in Ithaca, N.Y., from complications of a heart attack, the university announced. He and fellow Cornell researchers David Lee and Douglas Osheroff were awarded the Nobel in 1996 for their 1971 work on extremely low-temperature physics involving the isotope helium-3. Their discovery demonstrated that the isotope became a "superfluid" that flows without friction, and it contributed to research ranging from the properties of microscopic matter to astrophysics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Susan King
The nominees in the feature film category of the 24th annual American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement Awards announced Monday have a distinctly international flavor. The lone American -- Robert Richardson for "Inglourious Basterds" -- is joined by Briton Barry Ackroyd, who is nominated for "The Hurt Locker"; Aussie Dion Beebe, for "Nine"; Mauro Fiore of Italy, for "Avatar"; and Austrian Christian Berger for "The White Ribbon," the only black-and-white film in the group.
BOOKS
November 5, 2006 | Scott McLemee, Scott McLemee is a columnist for Philosophers magazine and essayist-at-large for InsideHigherEd.com.
"HE was born," German philosopher Martin Heidegger once said in a lecture about Aristotle. "He thought. He died." So much for the biographical details. Everything else was gossip: entertaining but meaningless and, in any case, unworthy of serious philosophical attention. In this, Heidegger's attitude was by no means unusual. (Although someone who closed his lectures with "Heil Hitler!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2000 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Richardson, a Los Angeles Times classified advertising messenger who volunteered his services to the news department during the 1965 Watts riots and became the newspaper's only black employee reporting on the rioting, died Friday at 59, family members said. He died in a West Los Angeles hospital of an asthma attack, his wife, Alice, said Sunday.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
OL SAN CLEMENTE SR. As the Tritons' center, the 6-3, 240-pound Richardson is a key reason San Clemente has averaged 4,000 yards of offense each of the past three seasons. "He was so quick we used him as a lead blocker on trap plays," Coach Mark McElroy said. "That's rare for a center."
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Vicki Hearne, Vicki Hearne's most recent book is "Animal Happiness" (HarperCollins)
Henry David Thoreau once noted that "A muskrat trapper like John Goodwin worked indoors in all weather, consuming little fuel; Emerson sat at his desk and burned many cords of wood." And it seems that sitting in his study and writing, when not on the road giving lectures, was Emerson's principal occupation. He had a family with his second wife, he put a fair amount of thought into a fruit orchard, but mostly he read and wrote, burning, as Thoreau says, many cords of wood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1972, a group of 11-year-old boys marched to City Hall and demanded that Santa Ana officials abandon plans to chop down a dozen camphor trees surrounding Willard Intermediate School. They gathered at then-Public Works Director Ron Wolford's office and declared their dedication to saving the expansive trees. Their leader, a skinny fifth-grader, impressed Wolford with his argument and sincerity. "The kid was something else," recalled Wolford, who is now a city engineer.
BOOKS
November 5, 2006 | Scott McLemee, Scott McLemee is a columnist for Philosophers magazine and essayist-at-large for InsideHigherEd.com.
"HE was born," German philosopher Martin Heidegger once said in a lecture about Aristotle. "He thought. He died." So much for the biographical details. Everything else was gossip: entertaining but meaningless and, in any case, unworthy of serious philosophical attention. In this, Heidegger's attitude was by no means unusual. (Although someone who closed his lectures with "Heil Hitler!"
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Vicki Hearne, Vicki Hearne's most recent book is "Animal Happiness" (HarperCollins)
Henry David Thoreau once noted that "A muskrat trapper like John Goodwin worked indoors in all weather, consuming little fuel; Emerson sat at his desk and burned many cords of wood." And it seems that sitting in his study and writing, when not on the road giving lectures, was Emerson's principal occupation. He had a family with his second wife, he put a fair amount of thought into a fruit orchard, but mostly he read and wrote, burning, as Thoreau says, many cords of wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Richardson is hanging around locations for "Heat Wave," a TV movie about those sweaty August nights nearly 25 years ago when the ghettos in South-Central L.A. exploded into a holocaust. It was called the Watts riots, although some people prefer "insurrection." Richardson, raised in the neighborhood, watched in horror as much of it was burned and pillaged. Then 24, he was working as a classified ad messenger for The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There are frequent complaints that the Academy Award telecast is too long. In fact, the agreement between the motion-picture academy and the ABC network stipulates that the show cannot be less than three hours long. How else to get in all those commercials. Still, there are suggestions that some of the "lesser" awards be sent by mail--a thought greeted by rightful indignation in the industry. What is Batman going to do without special effects, take the stairs?
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