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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1999
"Elizabeth" 'Life Is Beautiful" "Saving Private Ryan" "Shakespeare in Love" "The Thin Red Line" * Best Actor Roberto Benigni, "Life Is Beautiful" Tom Hanks, "Saving Private Ryan" Ian McKellen, "Gods and Monsters" Nick Nolte, "Affliction" Edward Norton, "American History X" * Best Actress Cate Blanchett, "Elizabeth" Fernanda Montenegro, "Central Station" Gwyneth Paltrow, "Shakespeare in Love" Meryl Streep, "One True Thing" Emily Watson, "Hilary and Jackie" * Best Director Roberto Benigni, "Life
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1999 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the telltale title indicates, time is of the essence in "36 Hours to Die," a slick and satisfying thriller premiering Sunday on TNT. Treat Williams is a vulnerable protagonist as Noah Stone, a brewery owner who suffers a heart attack minutes into the film. Two months later, Noah must grapple with a tricky ticker and the future of his family when a crafty embezzler (Saul Rubinek) unveils a multimillion-dollar scheme to crush his company.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | RAY LOYND
It's no accident that "The Comrades of Summer" (on HBO tonight at 8) takes its name from that great baseball book about the Brooklyn Dodgers, "The Boys of Summer." However different these "Comrades" and "Boys" may be, this cross-cultural sports movie-- a what if bit of baseball glasnost --evokes the brash spirit of grown boys playing Abner Doubleday's game because it's fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a good children's film is supposed to open the eyes of its young audience, then the somewhat misleadingly titled "Tall Tale: The Unbelievable Adventures of Pecos Bill" is mighty good. It's not made with any special feeling for childhood, the script is fairly hackneyed, and there are too many shots of amber waves of grain. But the film at least captures the mythic spaciousness of tall tales. It's a Disney kidfest re-imagined with a poet's eye.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2000 | REX ELLIS, Rex Ellis is chair of the division of cultural history at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. His specialties are slavery and early American history
I read with great interest Spike Lee's recent letter as well as Kevin Phillips' article concerning the film "The Patriot" (" 'Patriot's' Skirmish With Truth," July 7). I am in agreement with much of what he says, particularly as it relates to the contributions and presence of enslaved African Americans in South Carolina during the revolutionary period. Certainly more could have been done to represent the black majority that lived in the Low country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"How could it come to this, an army of peasants, rabble?" commander Lord Gen. Cornwallis wonders from the losing side of the Revolutionary War. The British, as it turns out, committed the one mistake no armed force, no matter how powerful, can afford to make: They stepped on Mel Gibson's last nerve. At least this is the case made by "The Patriot," an epic look at America's war for independence that has designs on being a better film than it finally is.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
First came the horse. Then the wolf. And now the geese. When director Carroll Ballard makes a strong connection with the animal kingdom, a special kind of film results. Ballard, whose previous credits include "The Black Stallion" and "Never Cry Wolf," knows how to be both caring and restrained, minimizing a movie's saccharine content while maximizing the sense of wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
More than any of his other films, and that includes "Schindler's List," Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" won't leave you alone. To see it is to need to talk about it, to wrestle both with the formidable impact of its unprecedented strengths and the surprising resilience of its niggling weaknesses. A powerful and impressive milestone in the realistic depiction of combat, "Saving Private Ryan" is as much an experience we live through as a film we watch on screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
STAGE 'Hughie' Replaces 'Tiger': When Al Pacino takes the stage of the Mark Taper Forum in Eugene O'Neill's 1941 play "Hughie" (June 27 to July 25), he'll be reprising a role that he played first at the Long Wharf Theatre in Connecticut and then on Broadway in 1996. This high-profile replacement fills a hole left when South African playwright-actor-director Athol Fugard decided that he will no longer act, prompting the cancellation of his play "The Captain's Tiger."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ
POP MUSIC Songwriter Survey: A group of famous songwriters surveyed by a British music magazine has named the Beatles' "In My Life" the best song ever. Mojo magazine gathered Top 10 lists from Paul McCartney, Brian Wilson, Hal David, Jerry Leiber and 16 other noted songwriters to assemble the tally of top songs. "In My Life," credited to John Lennon and McCartney but widely regarded as a Lennon work, topped Mick Jagger and Keith Richards' Rolling Stones classic "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."
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