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Robert Rubin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999
Of all the comments on Robert Rubin stepping down as secretary of the Treasury (May 13), none has mentioned what I think was his finest moment. When the Republican-led majority decided it would make sense to shut the government down, there was a real threat of a default on the federal debt. If the U.S. defaulted on its debt, it is hard to overestimate the devastating effect it would have had not only on our economy but the economy of every country in the world. U.S. securities are the backbone of the world economy and with over $5 trillion in outstanding debt, a collapse in its value from a default could have brought the economy of the world to a standstill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Facing a possible lawsuit over the way it chooses its directors, the board of the Coachella Valley Water District voted Tuesday to drop its at-large elections system. From now on, directors will be elected by geographic district.  The change comes less than a month after attorneys warned  in a letter that  the jurisdiction's at-large elections were likely in violation of the California Voting Rights Act. "The letter raised some serious issues that warranted a thorough evaluation," board President John Powell Jr. said in a statement issued after Tuesday's vote.  "I don't want any of the district's constituents to feel like they aren't fairly represented, so I wholeheartedly support the change," Powell added.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Opening a new front on efforts to improve minority representation on local elected boards,  attorneys  representing several Latino citizens have accused the Coachella Valley Water District of violating the California Voting Rights Act. In a letter delivered Monday to John Powell, the district's board president, lawyers Robert Rubin and Megan Beaman said the district's  at-large election system "dilutes the ability of Latino constituents to...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Opening a new front on efforts to improve minority representation on local elected boards,  attorneys  representing several Latino citizens have accused the Coachella Valley Water District of violating the California Voting Rights Act. In a letter delivered Monday to John Powell, the district's board president, lawyers Robert Rubin and Megan Beaman said the district's  at-large election system "dilutes the ability of Latino constituents to...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Facing a possible lawsuit over the way it chooses its directors, the board of the Coachella Valley Water District voted Tuesday to drop its at-large elections system. From now on, directors will be elected by geographic district.  The change comes less than a month after attorneys warned  in a letter that  the jurisdiction's at-large elections were likely in violation of the California Voting Rights Act. "The letter raised some serious issues that warranted a thorough evaluation," board President John Powell Jr. said in a statement issued after Tuesday's vote.  "I don't want any of the district's constituents to feel like they aren't fairly represented, so I wholeheartedly support the change," Powell added.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1993 | JAMES RISEN and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A controversial federal sale of $2 billion worth of real estate in California and elsewhere to a Wall Street investment firm with close ties to the Clinton Administration has collapsed after a congressional investigation, according to a new government report. But the investment firm of Goldman Sachs will still reap up to $12 million in fees this summer from the Resolution Trust Corp., the federal agency handling the S&L mess.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Robert E. Rubin, the former Treasury secretary who advised Citigroup Inc. as it lost $20 billion in the subprime mortgage crisis, resigned his position as senior counselor and won't stand for reelection to the board. Rubin, 70, intends to "deepen his involvement in outside activities and organizations to which he has been strongly committed," the New York-based bank said Friday in a statement.
OPINION
February 21, 1993 | David Lauter and James Risen
It may seem odd, given the populist tone of Bill Clinton's campaign, but two of the most powerful economic policy-makers of his Administration hail directly from Wall Street, from two of the bluest chips on the block. The two are old friends--Robert E. Rubin, 54, the former head of the Goldman Sachs investment house and Roger Altman, 46, a successful Wall Street consultant affiliated with the Blackstone Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate teaches at UCLA. His Pacific Prospect column runs Wednesdays. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
Robert E. Rubin, who resigned Wednesday as Treasury secretary, is a great credit to the nation and to the president he served but came across as a great enigma to the rest of the world. In Asia, especially, his elliptical views on the dangers as well as advantages of globalization were frustrating to the region of the world most terribly hit by the currency and capital crises.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stakes are high for the United States if Brazil, Latin America's biggest economy, falls into recession, or worse, devalues its currency, a fact underscored by an unusual telephone call of support to Brazil's president Friday by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin. In a statement to reporters, Rubin said he called President Fernando Henrique Cardoso to "express U.S.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Two former top Citigroup Inc. executives apologized Thursday for the financial crisis and the $45-billion public bailout needed to save the banking giant from collapse. But Democrats and Republicans ripped the executives for not taking any responsibility for the company's dramatic fall and the nation's fiscal morass. "I'm sorry that the financial crisis has had such a devastating impact on our country. I'm sorry for the millions of people, average Americans who have lost their homes," Charles "Chuck" Prince, Citigroup's chief executive from 2003 to 2007, told the commission investigating the crisis.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Robert E. Rubin, the former Treasury secretary who advised Citigroup Inc. as it lost $20 billion in the subprime mortgage crisis, resigned his position as senior counselor and won't stand for reelection to the board. Rubin, 70, intends to "deepen his involvement in outside activities and organizations to which he has been strongly committed," the New York-based bank said Friday in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2004 | James Flanigan, Times Staff Writer
When Robert E. Rubin went to work as an economic advisor to President Clinton in 1993, the federal budget deficit was nearly $300 billion, 4.7% of the country's annual output of goods and services, or gross domestic product, at that time. Rubin, first as the organizer of Clinton's National Economic Council and then as secretary of the Treasury, devised the policies that eliminated that budget deficit.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Citigroup Inc. on Tuesday tapped former Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin to help run the financial services powerhouse, where he joins Sanford Weill and John Reed in a triumvirate at the top. Rubin, who quit the U.S. Treasury this summer after a four-year stint as secretary, will become chairman of the board's executive committee and join a new three-person office of the chairman. Rubin co-headed U.S. investment bank Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999
Of all the comments on Robert Rubin stepping down as secretary of the Treasury (May 13), none has mentioned what I think was his finest moment. When the Republican-led majority decided it would make sense to shut the government down, there was a real threat of a default on the federal debt. If the U.S. defaulted on its debt, it is hard to overestimate the devastating effect it would have had not only on our economy but the economy of every country in the world. U.S. securities are the backbone of the world economy and with over $5 trillion in outstanding debt, a collapse in its value from a default could have brought the economy of the world to a standstill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate teaches at UCLA. His Pacific Prospect column runs Wednesdays. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
Robert E. Rubin, who resigned Wednesday as Treasury secretary, is a great credit to the nation and to the president he served but came across as a great enigma to the rest of the world. In Asia, especially, his elliptical views on the dangers as well as advantages of globalization were frustrating to the region of the world most terribly hit by the currency and capital crises.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Two former top Citigroup Inc. executives apologized Thursday for the financial crisis and the $45-billion public bailout needed to save the banking giant from collapse. But Democrats and Republicans ripped the executives for not taking any responsibility for the company's dramatic fall and the nation's fiscal morass. "I'm sorry that the financial crisis has had such a devastating impact on our country. I'm sorry for the millions of people, average Americans who have lost their homes," Charles "Chuck" Prince, Citigroup's chief executive from 2003 to 2007, told the commission investigating the crisis.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1992 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In picking Robert E. Rubin to be the White House's economics czar Thursday, President-elect Bill Clinton no doubt is hoping that Rubin can do for the U.S. economy what his management team did for Goldman, Sachs & Co. Rubin, 54, co-chairman of the phenomenally successful investment house, presided along with his counterpart, Stephen Friedman, as Goldman Sachs solidified its preeminence on Wall Street, last year earning a record pretax profit of $1.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stakes are high for the United States if Brazil, Latin America's biggest economy, falls into recession, or worse, devalues its currency, a fact underscored by an unusual telephone call of support to Brazil's president Friday by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin. In a statement to reporters, Rubin said he called President Fernando Henrique Cardoso to "express U.S.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When global financial markets took a dive last week, threatening to worsen the Asian economic slump, the man in the spotlight was Robert E. Rubin. For 13 months, the U.S. Treasury secretary has been calling the shots on Asia--and has won widespread kudos for it. Allen Sinai, a prominent Wall Street economist, unabashedly calls Rubin "the best Treasury secretary in American history"--"almost perfect" in managing both the domestic economy and the turmoil in emerging markets overseas.
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