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NEWS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) said Thursday he is parting company with attorney Robert S. Bennett, confirming speculation that began after the lawmaker's indictment. "Today, Bob Bennett, my attorney in the House post office investigation, and I mutually decided to go our separate ways. I will soon retain new counsel, and will present a vigorous defense to the charges recently brought against me," Rostenkowski said in a statement released by his office.
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NEWS
July 30, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few scandals ago, before Robert S. Bennett was defending the president, he was chief investigator of the ethics of a group of U.S. senators known as the Keating Five. One day, Thomas C. Green, the lawyer for one of the senators and a close friend, went into Bennett's office, reached over the back of his chair and started rubbing his ample belly. "Bobby, Bobby baby, please let me see those documents," Green pleaded, eager to get help for his client.
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NEWS
November 16, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A husky former boxer described as "extremely bright, thorough and fair," special counsel Robert S. Bennett looms as a formidable friend or foe to the "Keating Five" senators whose Senate ethics hearings began Thursday. "Anybody who did nothing wrong should feel comforted by Bob Bennett," said Plato Cacheris, a former law partner. "But anybody who transgressed will have problems." Cacheris' Exhibit A: Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) said Thursday he is parting company with attorney Robert S. Bennett, confirming speculation that began after the lawmaker's indictment. "Today, Bob Bennett, my attorney in the House post office investigation, and I mutually decided to go our separate ways. I will soon retain new counsel, and will present a vigorous defense to the charges recently brought against me," Rostenkowski said in a statement released by his office.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Ethics Committee voted unanimously Friday to have an outside counsel review influence-peddling allegations against Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators in connection with the $2-billion failure of Lincoln Savings and Loan of Irvine. The committee voted also to have the special counsel investigate similar complaints against Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.) resulting from scandal at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Robert S.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate Ethics Committee finished a grueling 26 days of hearings Wednesday, special counsel Robert S. Bennett accused five senators of acting like "an 800-pound gorilla" when they intervened with regulators on behalf of thrift owner Charles H. Keating Jr. Bennett brushed aside assertions by lawyers for the senators that they were only doing their duty as elected officials in going to bat for Keating, a combative savings and loan operator who contributed $1.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) had a bitter quarrel in 1987 after Keating told another senator that McCain--a former prisoner of war in Vietnam--was a "wimp" for refusing to help Lincoln in its battle with regulators, the Senate Ethics Committee was told Tuesday. Christopher L. Koch, an aide to McCain, testified that he witnessed the nasty encounter between Keating and his boss in the senator's office in March, 1987.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Ethics Committee will appoint an outside counsel to investigate allegations of influence peddling against Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators who intervened with federal regulators on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan after receiving campaign donations from the owner of the Irvine thrift, sources said Thursday. The panel is believed to have settled on Robert S.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) cried foul Monday over the release of a confidential ethics report that accuses him of "reprehensible" conduct for his actions on behalf of savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr. Cranston charged through his spokesman that Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who released the report, is "an extreme right-winger" who had acted for highly partisan motives. Helms is one of six members of the Senate Ethics Committee, which is evaluating the case against Cranston.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.), in an indignant rebuttal to charges of official misconduct, Monday accused the Senate Ethics Committee's chief investigator of manufacturing a case against the "Keating Five" through hearsay and newly minted standards of conduct. "He wants a victim," the senator declared, referring to Robert S. Bennett, the committee's special counsel. "He wants to nail somebody. He wants another trophy on the wall."
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, facing the likelihood of a sexual harassment lawsuit in addition to his Whitewater problems, has engaged one of the nation's premier defense lawyers in white-collar cases to help coordinate his legal and public relations strategy. White House officials said that Robert S.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) cried foul Monday over the release of a confidential ethics report that accuses him of "reprehensible" conduct for his actions on behalf of savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr. Cranston charged through his spokesman that Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who released the report, is "an extreme right-winger" who had acted for highly partisan motives. Helms is one of six members of the Senate Ethics Committee, which is evaluating the case against Cranston.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate Ethics Committee finished a grueling 26 days of hearings Wednesday, special counsel Robert S. Bennett accused five senators of acting like "an 800-pound gorilla" when they intervened with regulators on behalf of thrift owner Charles H. Keating Jr. Bennett brushed aside assertions by lawyers for the senators that they were only doing their duty as elected officials in going to bat for Keating, a combative savings and loan operator who contributed $1.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) had a bitter quarrel in 1987 after Keating told another senator that McCain--a former prisoner of war in Vietnam--was a "wimp" for refusing to help Lincoln in its battle with regulators, the Senate Ethics Committee was told Tuesday. Christopher L. Koch, an aide to McCain, testified that he witnessed the nasty encounter between Keating and his boss in the senator's office in March, 1987.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.), in an indignant rebuttal to charges of official misconduct, Monday accused the Senate Ethics Committee's chief investigator of manufacturing a case against the "Keating Five" through hearsay and newly minted standards of conduct. "He wants a victim," the senator declared, referring to Robert S. Bennett, the committee's special counsel. "He wants to nail somebody. He wants another trophy on the wall."
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Senate Ethics Committee opened hearings into the "Keating Five" scandal, the panel's top investigator said Thursday that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) persisted in pressuring regulators on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan after he had been told by a fellow Democrat that the thrift's owner was a "crook." In outlining evidence against five senators, who are accused of acting improperly on behalf of Lincoln owner Charles H. Keating Jr., special counsel Robert S.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few scandals ago, before Robert S. Bennett was defending the president, he was chief investigator of the ethics of a group of U.S. senators known as the Keating Five. One day, Thomas C. Green, the lawyer for one of the senators and a close friend, went into Bennett's office, reached over the back of his chair and started rubbing his ample belly. "Bobby, Bobby baby, please let me see those documents," Green pleaded, eager to get help for his client.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Senate Ethics Committee opened hearings into the "Keating Five" scandal, the panel's top investigator said Thursday that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) persisted in pressuring regulators on behalf of Lincoln Savings & Loan after he had been told by a fellow Democrat that the thrift's owner was a "crook." In outlining evidence against five senators, who are accused of acting improperly on behalf of Lincoln owner Charles H. Keating Jr., special counsel Robert S.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A husky former boxer described as "extremely bright, thorough and fair," special counsel Robert S. Bennett looms as a formidable friend or foe to the "Keating Five" senators whose Senate ethics hearings began Thursday. "Anybody who did nothing wrong should feel comforted by Bob Bennett," said Plato Cacheris, a former law partner. "But anybody who transgressed will have problems." Cacheris' Exhibit A: Sen. Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Ethics Committee voted unanimously Friday to have an outside counsel review influence-peddling allegations against Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators in connection with the $2-billion failure of Lincoln Savings and Loan of Irvine. The committee voted also to have the special counsel investigate similar complaints against Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato (R-N.Y.) resulting from scandal at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Robert S.
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