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Robert S Harp

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BUSINESS
August 13, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Personal computer pioneer Robert S. Harp said Wednesday that he has resigned as chairman of Cordata Technologies after an angry dispute earlier this week with executives from the Korean industrial conglomerate that owns 70% of the Newbury Park company. Harp also said that the Daewoo Group, Cordata's principal owner, plans to effectively shut down the 6-year-old concern, which has struggled to win a share of the market for IBM-compatible personal computers.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Personal computer pioneer Robert S. Harp said Wednesday that he has resigned as chairman of Cordata Technologies after an angry dispute earlier this week with executives from the Korean industrial conglomerate that owns 70% of the Newbury Park company. Harp also said that the Daewoo Group, Cordata's principal owner, plans to effectively shut down the 6-year-old concern, which has struggled to win a share of the market for IBM-compatible personal computers.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 1996 | Barbara Murphy
Franklin Telecom of Westlake Village has named Thomas Russell, 45, as chief financial officer and director. The company also announced the appointment of Robert S. Harp, 59, as a director of FTC and FNet, a subsidiary of Franklin Telecom. Russell, a CPA, has experience working with the Securities and Exchange Commission on initial public offerings of stock. This is his second time serving Franklin Telecom as chief financial officer, a position he first held in 1988.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1985 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Always fast on its feet, Corona Data Systems of Thousand Oaks was one of the trend-setters in November, 1982, when it came out with a personal computer that was compatible with the IBM PC. Trouble is, being one of the first in that business was nearly akin to being at the head of the line to buy tickets on the Titanic. The industry eventually was deluged with companies that manufactured IBM PC clones, and the bruising competition crippled one computer maker after another.
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