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Robert S Mcnamara

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NEWS
July 17, 1986 | United Press International
Robert S. McNamara, former secretary of defense under President John F. Kennedy, today informed Caroline Kennedy he will have to miss her wedding Saturday to attend to a "corporate emergency." McNamara, former president of the World Bank, said he was "very disappointed" he will miss Kennedy's wedding to Edwin Arthur Schlossberg on Cape Cod and a reunion with other former Kennedy Cabinet members. "It grieves me not to be able to attend," said McNamara, noting that he keeps in touch with C.
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OPINION
December 27, 2009
This year saw the last acts of showbiz notables Army Archerd, Bea Arthur, David Carradine, Dom DeLuise, Farrah Fawcett, John Hughes, Michael Jackson, Ricardo Montalban, Brittany Murphy, Soupy Sales, Patrick Swayze, Ed McMahon, Koko Taylor, Mary Travers and many others. Journalism wrote obits for Paul Harvey, Don Hewitt, Irving Kristol, Robert Novak and William Safire. Politics lost Corazon C. Aquino, Jack Kemp, Edward M. Kennedy, Robert S. McNamara, Claiborne Pell and Cornelia Wallace.
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OPINION
December 27, 2009
This year saw the last acts of showbiz notables Army Archerd, Bea Arthur, David Carradine, Dom DeLuise, Farrah Fawcett, John Hughes, Michael Jackson, Ricardo Montalban, Brittany Murphy, Soupy Sales, Patrick Swayze, Ed McMahon, Koko Taylor, Mary Travers and many others. Journalism wrote obits for Paul Harvey, Don Hewitt, Irving Kristol, Robert Novak and William Safire. Politics lost Corazon C. Aquino, Jack Kemp, Edward M. Kennedy, Robert S. McNamara, Claiborne Pell and Cornelia Wallace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Stephen Braun
Driven, cerebral and pugnacious, Robert S. McNamara was the preeminent policymaker behind the massive buildup of American forces in Vietnam between 1964 and 1968. As Defense secretary for two administrations, he wielded blizzards of facts and figures to press the case for deploying military advisors and then ground troops to counter the advance of communist forces in North Vietnam and Viet Cong guerrillas in South Vietnam.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara and others who waged war in Vietnam came together Friday to examine why the fighting dragged on for so long. Former warriors, scholars and political analysts met here in the Vietnamese capital to compare notes on why peace initiatives failed and the United States became entangled in a war McNamara has since called unwinnable. "We each could have achieved our geopolitical objectives without a terrible loss of life," McNamara told the Associated Press.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time his tour of duty as an Army medic in Vietnam ended in 1966, Earl Clarkson says, he was "a dead zombie with a smile on." Coming home, he struggled with frequent bouts of depression. He tried to kill himself twice. He broke his wife's nose in a spasm of uncontrollable rage. He had nightmares and flashbacks of Vietnam so vivid, he says, that he could "smell the monsoon rains." So when he read news accounts about how former Defense Secretary Robert S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Little Saigon Radio talk show on former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara's controversial new memoir had ended an hour ago. Still, the phones continued to ring. If America's involvement in the war was indeed "wrong, terribly wrong," as McNamara put it, did that mean the Vietnamese also made a mistake, one caller asked. Did the millions of Vietnamese who fought or fled their homeland do it for nothing, another demanded.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | DAN OBERDORFER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara said Monday that new Soviet revelations about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, including the presence of hitherto unknown Soviet short-range atomic weapons in Cuba at the time, indicate that the two nations were much closer to a nuclear conflict than was previously realized. McNamara made the statement after returning to Washington from a four-day closed-door meeting in Havana of former U.S.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Tuesday he doubts that the U.N. economic and military sanctions against Iraq will force Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to withdraw his occupying troops from Kuwait. "I've not been one who has been convinced that sanctions alone will bring him to his senses," the President said, while adding that the measures are "having some effect." "The best chance for peace is for him to understand that all means--all means--necessary . . . will be used against him," Bush said.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | Associated Press
Robert McNamara returned to Vietnam on Tuesday for the first time since the end of the war he helped escalate in the 1960s, and he said he hopes to persuade the country to open its archives on the conflict. The former U.S. defense secretary has admitted in memoirs that U.S. participation in the Vietnam War was "terribly wrong." His current trip is to propose a conference of war-era decision-makers from both countries.
BOOKS
June 3, 2001 | DAVID RIEFF, David Rieff is a contributing writer to Book Review
Every generation is vulnerable to imagining itself either uniquely blessed or uniquely cursed. And for an understandable reason. After all, it is simply human nature to attach more importance to the time in which one has been fated to live and die than to either the past or the remoter reaches of the future.
BOOKS
May 16, 1999 | STANLEY KARNOW, Stanley Karnow, author of "Vietnam: A History," was awarded the 1990 Pulitzer Prize in history. His latest book is "Paris in the Fifties."
Coincidentally yet appropriately, Robert McNamara's middle name is Strange. From 1961 to 1967, as defense secretary in both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, he was the chief architect and principal promoter of America's deepening involvement in Vietnam. He managed the war the way he had run the Ford Motor Co., his job before becoming a bureaucrat.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara and others who waged war in Vietnam came together Friday to examine why the fighting dragged on for so long. Former warriors, scholars and political analysts met here in the Vietnamese capital to compare notes on why peace initiatives failed and the United States became entangled in a war McNamara has since called unwinnable. "We each could have achieved our geopolitical objectives without a terrible loss of life," McNamara told the Associated Press.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | Associated Press
Robert McNamara returned to Vietnam on Tuesday for the first time since the end of the war he helped escalate in the 1960s, and he said he hopes to persuade the country to open its archives on the conflict. The former U.S. defense secretary has admitted in memoirs that U.S. participation in the Vietnam War was "terribly wrong." His current trip is to propose a conference of war-era decision-makers from both countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Little Saigon Radio talk show on former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara's controversial new memoir had ended an hour ago. Still, the phones continued to ring. If America's involvement in the war was indeed "wrong, terribly wrong," as McNamara put it, did that mean the Vietnamese also made a mistake, one caller asked. Did the millions of Vietnamese who fought or fled their homeland do it for nothing, another demanded.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time his tour of duty as an Army medic in Vietnam ended in 1966, Earl Clarkson says, he was "a dead zombie with a smile on." Coming home, he struggled with frequent bouts of depression. He tried to kill himself twice. He broke his wife's nose in a spasm of uncontrollable rage. He had nightmares and flashbacks of Vietnam so vivid, he says, that he could "smell the monsoon rains." So when he read news accounts about how former Defense Secretary Robert S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Stephen Braun
Driven, cerebral and pugnacious, Robert S. McNamara was the preeminent policymaker behind the massive buildup of American forces in Vietnam between 1964 and 1968. As Defense secretary for two administrations, he wielded blizzards of facts and figures to press the case for deploying military advisors and then ground troops to counter the advance of communist forces in North Vietnam and Viet Cong guerrillas in South Vietnam.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | TED THACKREY Jr., Times Staff Writer
Auto magnate Henry Ford II, who for 35 years ran the automobile company founded by his grandfather, managing it from the brink of disaster to the top rank of industrial power, died Tuesday in a Detroit hospital. Ford, 70, who had a history of heart problems, was admitted to Cottage Hospital in suburban Grosse Pointe Farms on Sept. 9 for treatment of pneumonia he contracted while living at his country estate outside London. He was transferred Sept.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | DAN OBERDORFER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara said Monday that new Soviet revelations about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, including the presence of hitherto unknown Soviet short-range atomic weapons in Cuba at the time, indicate that the two nations were much closer to a nuclear conflict than was previously realized. McNamara made the statement after returning to Washington from a four-day closed-door meeting in Havana of former U.S.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Tuesday he doubts that the U.N. economic and military sanctions against Iraq will force Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to withdraw his occupying troops from Kuwait. "I've not been one who has been convinced that sanctions alone will bring him to his senses," the President said, while adding that the measures are "having some effect." "The best chance for peace is for him to understand that all means--all means--necessary . . . will be used against him," Bush said.
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