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Robert S Strauss

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November 11, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was after hours, and Robert S. Strauss, the Texas millionaire who ceases being U.S. ambassador to Moscow today, sipped his 80-proof vodka on the rocks and reviewed the record of his 15 months inside the whirlwind of Russian politics. "I don't think I had any influence on (the Russian) Parliament," Strauss mused at one point, explaining that American businesses still must operate here without the explicit laws on taxation and real and intellectual property they want.
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NEWS
January 28, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the more arresting--and recurring--images of President Bush's first week in office. For three straight days, there by the new president's side was none other than America's longest serving Senate liberal: Edward M. Kennedy. The Massachusetts Democrat's omnipotence revealed several important traits about the nation's 43rd president, a self-styled "compassionate conservative." He seems to be a man of his word.
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NEWS
June 6, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow has never seen anything like this. After all the other things the United States has sent the Soviets--Billy Joel, McDonald's, minor-league baseball--now, instead of billions of dollars, George Bush is sending them a millionaire named Robert S. Strauss. Strauss is the ultimate Washington insider, a consummate schmoozer who can deal with anybody and has.
OPINION
August 13, 2000 | David R. Gergen, David R. Gergen, editor at large for U.S. News & World Report and a contributor to "The News Hour With Jim Lehrer," served as a White House advisor to four presidents
'I don't have the faintest idea who the next president will be," House Speaker Jim Wright once cracked, "but I know exactly who the president's best friend is going to be: Bob Strauss." Over a span of four decades, that was often true. When trouble hit, President Lyndon B. Johnson turned to his fellow Democrat. So did President Jimmy Carter. So did a couple of Republican presidents, Ronald Reagan and George Bush. Blessed with a canny sense for both politics and poker, Robert S.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | Reuters
The U.S. ambassador to Russia described Moscow's economic reform program Sunday as more courageous than coherent and said it is too soon for the United States to pump billions of dollars in financial aid into the country. "It wouldn't be prudent to spend money today," Ambassador Robert S. Strauss told the National Governors' Assn. He said that Russia still lacks the financial institutions and economic structures to make sure the money is not wasted.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert S. Strauss, the wily Potomac powerbroker turned U.S. diplomat, said Monday he will resign as ambassador to Russia by the end of the year but will keep lobbying for the cause of Russian reform in Washington. After meeting with President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday afternoon, Strauss said he reassured the Russian leader that "instead of losing an ambassador, you'll pick one up when I go back to the States."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992
Robert S. Strauss was the first to admit that he knew little about Russia when President Bush named him as ambassador to Moscow last year. Where the Washington lawyer and Democratic wheeler-dealer does have expertise is in deal-making and persuasion. Surveying the shambles of Russia's economy, Strauss has come up with some imaginative ideas about how U.S. talent and experience can begin to help, and fairly quickly.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"The first thing I'm going to do is go to Israel and court Premier (Menachem) Begin's wife like she was an 18-year-old schoolgirl," Robert S. Strauss told a friend in 1979 when President Jimmy Carter named him special envoy to the Mideast. "Then, I'll go to Egypt and court President (Anwar) Sadat's wife the same way." Before long, Strauss predicted, "one of those ladies is going to turn around in bed to her husband and say: 'You know, that little Bobby Strauss is not such a bad guy.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Bowing to the political and economic complexities of deficit reduction, the co-chairmen of the National Economic Commission said Sunday that they might delay issuing their recommendations on how to trim the $155-billion budget deficit to give President-elect George Bush the first crack at solving the problem. "I think the timing of our report would better serve the President if it were Sept.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selling aid to Russia as if it were a domestic pork-barrel program, Ambassador Robert S. Strauss cut a swathe across Capitol Hill, pushing a balky House of Representatives toward a vote to approve President Bush's proposal for billions of dollars in multinational loans to Moscow.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was after hours, and Robert S. Strauss, the Texas millionaire who ceases being U.S. ambassador to Moscow today, sipped his 80-proof vodka on the rocks and reviewed the record of his 15 months inside the whirlwind of Russian politics. "I don't think I had any influence on (the Russian) Parliament," Strauss mused at one point, explaining that American businesses still must operate here without the explicit laws on taxation and real and intellectual property they want.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert S. Strauss, the wily Potomac powerbroker turned U.S. diplomat, said Monday he will resign as ambassador to Russia by the end of the year but will keep lobbying for the cause of Russian reform in Washington. After meeting with President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday afternoon, Strauss said he reassured the Russian leader that "instead of losing an ambassador, you'll pick one up when I go back to the States."
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selling aid to Russia as if it were a domestic pork-barrel program, Ambassador Robert S. Strauss cut a swathe across Capitol Hill, pushing a balky House of Representatives toward a vote to approve President Bush's proposal for billions of dollars in multinational loans to Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992
Robert S. Strauss was the first to admit that he knew little about Russia when President Bush named him as ambassador to Moscow last year. Where the Washington lawyer and Democratic wheeler-dealer does have expertise is in deal-making and persuasion. Surveying the shambles of Russia's economy, Strauss has come up with some imaginative ideas about how U.S. talent and experience can begin to help, and fairly quickly.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid Russia's collapsing economy, U.S. Ambassador Robert S. Strauss has an idea on how to help reverse the trend and move away from seven decades of Soviet socialism--open a dozen grocery stores. "Not big American supermarkets with everything, but stores that sell milk and eggs and sausage and vegetables," Strauss said Wednesday. "You know, grocery stores. "People need food, they have money and they will buy. Get two, three, four entrepreneurs and help them open corner groceries.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | Reuters
The U.S. ambassador to Russia described Moscow's economic reform program Sunday as more courageous than coherent and said it is too soon for the United States to pump billions of dollars in financial aid into the country. "It wouldn't be prudent to spend money today," Ambassador Robert S. Strauss told the National Governors' Assn. He said that Russia still lacks the financial institutions and economic structures to make sure the money is not wasted.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Bush, convinced that economic and political pressure will help spur the eventual collapse of the Soviet coup that toppled President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, declared Tuesday that the Western allies will deny aid to the Soviet Union's deteriorating economy unless the legal government is restored.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
The Democratic head of a bipartisan commission on the federal budget said Tuesday that he expects to recommend that the next President cut Social Security, Medicare and defense spending to bring the government's budget deficit under control. "There are no easy choices left," said longtime Washington power broker Robert S. Strauss, who stunned an audience that included economic advisers to both presidential candidates with his candid, detailed comments.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Bush, convinced that economic and political pressure will help spur the eventual collapse of the Soviet coup that toppled President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, declared Tuesday that the Western allies will deny aid to the Soviet Union's deteriorating economy unless the legal government is restored.
NEWS
August 21, 1991
Here are highlights from President Bush's Tuesday morning press conference: Bush: Well, events in the Soviet Union continue to deeply concern the whole world. The unconstitutional seizure of power is an affront to the goals and aspirations that the Soviet peoples have been nurturing over the past years.
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