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November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man charged in mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a lawyer refused Thursday to enter a plea, pending his attempt to bar any federal judge from hearing the case. In a hearing before a federal magistrate, lawyers for Walter Leroy Moody Jr. said the fact that a federal judge was one of the victims damages the impartiality of all federal judges. Moody's attorneys requested in a court motion that the Senate Judiciary Committee appoint an independent officer to hear the case. U.S.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
A man charged in mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a lawyer refused Thursday to enter a plea, pending his attempt to bar any federal judge from hearing the case. In a hearing before a federal magistrate, lawyers for Walter Leroy Moody Jr. said the fact that a federal judge was one of the victims damages the impartiality of all federal judges. Moody's attorneys requested in a court motion that the Senate Judiciary Committee appoint an independent officer to hear the case. U.S.
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NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday ordered a man who has been the focus of an investigation into fatal mail bombings held without bail until his trial on unrelated charges of witness tampering. Judge Wilbur D. Owens Jr. set a tentative trial date of Sept. 17 for Walter Leroy Moody Jr., 56. He ruled that Moody's wife, Susan McBride Moody, 28, could be released on a $250,000 property bond.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Georgia man "obsessed" with a legal dispute was indicted Wednesday for the 1989 mail-bomb murders of federal appellate Judge Robert S. Vance and Robert E. Robinson, a Savannah, Ga., NAACP attorney. A federal grand jury in Atlanta also charged Walter Leroy Moody Jr. in a 70-count indictment with sending other mail bombs to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the NAACP office at Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Appeals Court Judge Robert S. Vance, killed by a mailed pipe bomb, was remembered Wednesday as a man whose goal was "to resolve disputes reasonably and peacefully." The judge was killed last Saturday by the first of four pipe bombs mailed to individuals, the appeals court and the NAACP in a wave of terror the FBI says may be the work of racists. Saying he was "outraged" by the judge's death, a friend and fellow judge, R.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities Thursday began dragging a lake for evidence in the investigation of mail bombings in the South, and a junk dealer who had been questioned extensively by the FBI hired an attorney and quit cooperating with authorities. The junk dealer, Robert Wayne O'Ferrell, continued to protest that he is innocent. No charges have been filed in the case, in which a federal judge in Birmingham and a civil rights attorney in Georgia were killed by bombs last month.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | LEE MAY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anonymous letters mailed last August in a "declaration of war" against several federal appeals courts are being studied for possible connections to mail bombs that killed an Alabama judge and a Georgia civil rights lawyer, FBI officials said Wednesday. The letters were sent all over the country to news media and, in some cases, directly to circuit courts, according to Bob Davenport, deputy assistant FBI director for public affairs.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI agents Monday searched a man's salvage store, warehouse and home around Enterprise, Ala., in an intensified hunt for a suspect in the bombings that killed a federal appeals judge and a civil rights lawyer last month. The owner of each of the properties is Robert Wayne O'Ferrell, 46, who a government source said had lost a desegregation case decided last April by Judge Robert S. Vance of the 11th circuit court of appeals. Vance died Dec.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two victims of mail bombs in the South had something in common--both were known as civil rights advocates, and both may have died for their activities. Judge Robert S. Vance, 58, had ordered busing for school desegregation, sided with blacks in suits against white-controlled city governments and reinstated a federal lawsuit against members of the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama during his 11 years on the federal appeals court based in Atlanta.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group calling itself Americans for a Competent Federal Judicial System has claimed responsibility for the mail bombs that killed a federal judge and a lawyer and vowed to kill more people in retaliation for "savage acts of violence by black men against white women," authorities said Thursday. The claims and threats were in a letter to Brenda Wood, an anchorwoman at WAGA-TV in Atlanta.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday ordered a man who has been the focus of an investigation into fatal mail bombings held without bail until his trial on unrelated charges of witness tampering. Judge Wilbur D. Owens Jr. set a tentative trial date of Sept. 17 for Walter Leroy Moody Jr., 56. He ruled that Moody's wife, Susan McBride Moody, 28, could be released on a $250,000 property bond.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities Thursday began dragging a lake for evidence in the investigation of mail bombings in the South, and a junk dealer who had been questioned extensively by the FBI hired an attorney and quit cooperating with authorities. The junk dealer, Robert Wayne O'Ferrell, continued to protest that he is innocent. No charges have been filed in the case, in which a federal judge in Birmingham and a civil rights attorney in Georgia were killed by bombs last month.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities are investigating two brothers in connection with the series of mail bombings that killed two people last month, the father of the two men said Wednesday as authorities combed a warehouse here for evidence for the third straight day. J. C. O'Ferrell, 74, of Hobo Bend, Ala., said that FBI agents took blood and hair samples from a number of family members and questioned them Monday about Robert Wayne O'Ferrell, 46, and James (Buddy) O'Ferrell, 49.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | EDITH STANLEY and ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal agents questioned a junk dealer for the second day Tuesday and dug up a septic tank at his home as they intensified their probe of the mail-bomb murders of a federal judge and a Georgia NAACP official. FBI agents questioned Robert Wayne O'Ferrell for more than eight hours Tuesday. They also pumped out the contents of the septic tank, apparently in a search for explosive material, and continued to search the surplus store O'Ferrell owns here.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI agents Monday searched a man's salvage store, warehouse and home around Enterprise, Ala., in an intensified hunt for a suspect in the bombings that killed a federal appeals judge and a civil rights lawyer last month. The owner of each of the properties is Robert Wayne O'Ferrell, 46, who a government source said had lost a desegregation case decided last April by Judge Robert S. Vance of the 11th circuit court of appeals. Vance died Dec.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | LEE MAY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal investigators said here Wednesday that they have "no shortage" of leads in the recent mail-bomb murders of a federal judge and a lawyer in the South, but they acknowledged that the cases could remain unsolved for some time. Tom Moore, an FBI spokesman in Birmingham, Ala., noted that the 1979 murder of John Wood, a federal judge in Texas, "took almost five years to solve," but added that "we're cautiously optimistic that this won't take that long."
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Georgia man "obsessed" with a legal dispute was indicted Wednesday for the 1989 mail-bomb murders of federal appellate Judge Robert S. Vance and Robert E. Robinson, a Savannah, Ga., NAACP attorney. A federal grand jury in Atlanta also charged Walter Leroy Moody Jr. in a 70-count indictment with sending other mail bombs to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and the NAACP office at Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like footprints in snow, the four mail bombs that have killed two people in the South since Saturday left evidence of those who made them, forensic scientists said Tuesday. "Certain people make certain types of bombs," said Robert Barry, a retired FBI agent and head of the University of Southern California's Center for Administration of Justice. "If they've been successful with one type of bomb, they tend to stick with it and make others like it."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group calling itself Americans for a Competent Federal Judicial System has claimed responsibility for the mail bombs that killed a federal judge and a lawyer and vowed to kill more people in retaliation for "savage acts of violence by black men against white women," authorities said Thursday. The claims and threats were in a letter to Brenda Wood, an anchorwoman at WAGA-TV in Atlanta.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | LEE MAY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Anonymous letters mailed last August in a "declaration of war" against several federal appeals courts are being studied for possible connections to mail bombs that killed an Alabama judge and a Georgia civil rights lawyer, FBI officials said Wednesday. The letters were sent all over the country to news media and, in some cases, directly to circuit courts, according to Bob Davenport, deputy assistant FBI director for public affairs.
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