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December 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Robert Sabuda spends most of his day coloring, cutting and pasting. He's darn good at it too. But Sabuda is no kindergartner. He's a 40-year-old children's book author whose newest, "Winter's Tale: An Original Pop-Up Story," was ordered with a first printing of 250,000 copies. It's also the basis for many of the holiday decorations at Borders and Waldenbooks stores this season. Pop-up art is a kid-friendly name for paper engineering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Robert Sabuda spends most of his day coloring, cutting and pasting. He's darn good at it too. But Sabuda is no kindergartner. He's a 40-year-old children's book author whose newest, "Winter's Tale: An Original Pop-Up Story," was ordered with a first printing of 250,000 copies. It's also the basis for many of the holiday decorations at Borders and Waldenbooks stores this season. Pop-up art is a kid-friendly name for paper engineering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
THE backroom of Robert Sabuda's Upper West Side office looks like a combined day-care center and sweatshop. Tall windows in two walls let sunlight splash over packed-together desks and tables where a small cadre of adults meticulously cut out little paper figures, like kids engaged in a craft project. What they're really doing is helping revolutionize a childhood staple: the pop-up book.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
THE backroom of Robert Sabuda's Upper West Side office looks like a combined day-care center and sweatshop. Tall windows in two walls let sunlight splash over packed-together desks and tables where a small cadre of adults meticulously cut out little paper figures, like kids engaged in a craft project. What they're really doing is helping revolutionize a childhood staple: the pop-up book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2000
Books recommended for young readers by Ilene Abramson, senior librarian, children's literature department, Los Angeles Public Library. Usher in the Year of the Dragon with these fun and varied dragon stories. Preschool and kindergarten: "The Paper Dragon," by Marguerite W. Davol, illustrated by Robert Sabuda Pull-out pages provide a backdrop for this tale of a ferocious dragon who loses his grit when confronted with the power of love.
BOOKS
January 19, 2003
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING *--* *--* 1 Eloise Takes a Bawth by Kay Thompson et al (Simon & Schuster, $17.95) The irrepressible Eloise causes mischief at the Plaza Hotel in this long-awaited book. Ages 4-8 2 The Night Before Christmas Pop-up by Clement C. Moore (Little Simon, $24.95) A family of mice receive a visit from Santa Claus in this book, featuring intricate designs by Robert Sabuda.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday
Once upon a time, Richard Paul Evans wrote a simple story for his two young daughters about the meaning of Christmas. He later published the short tale himself, and watched it sell in store after store, until Simon & Schuster recognized a sure thing and paid him $4.2 million for the chance to turn the book into a seasonal evergreen. Released by S & S in November 1995, "The Christmas Box" sold more than 1.2 million decorative 5-by-7-inch copies.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | MARIA D. LASO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Read with someone you love. Author-illustrator Robert Sabuda's new "Saint Valentine" (Aladdin Paperbacks, $5.99), a simple primer for ages 4 to 7, is colorfully illustrated in mosaic style. The early Christian, a healer, was arrested for his religious beliefs, but from prison, it is said, he helped a blind girl see. Some of the more complex concepts, such as why the Romans don't want the Christians to worship one God, will be opportunities for discussion with curious middle readers.
BOOKS
December 4, 1994 | NICK BANTOCK
P op-up is an unfortunate term for a genre of books. The very word pop evokes insubstantial fashion and slightness of fad. That's a cruel handicap for any form that would take itself half-seriously. I wonder to what extent pop has kept pop-ups trapped as lightweights in the bookish arts. Suppose the same person who christened the Chinese game Mah Jong (roughly translated as the twittering of sparrows, after the noise the tiles made while being mixed), had also named pop-up books.
BOOKS
August 14, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST 1 Harry Potter and the 1 3 Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling (Arthur A. Levine/ Scholastic: $29.99) A teenage Harry faces a new darkness in his latest adventures. 2 No Country for Old Men by 4 2 Cormac McCarthy (Knopf: $24.95) An aging Texas sheriff investigates murder, drug trafficking and the disappearance of a local hunter. 3 Until I Find You by John 2 4 Irving (Random House: $27.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2004 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
WHILE it's a little too warm to be roasting chestnuts over an open fire, we Southern Californians cling to our various holiday traditions nonetheless -- whether it's listening to Nat King Cole's rendition of "The Christmas Song" or making latkes for Hanukkah or lighting the Kwanzaa kinara. For many, the holidays also mean buying just the right tree and unpacking the Christmas ornaments that will adorn it.
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