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Robert Salters

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July 9, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
The question hanging over Robert Salters' bid to become the U.S. Olympic boxing team's super-heavyweight is basically this: How can a guy who is afraid of his own dog possibly be expected to make the Olympic boxing team, much less win a medal at Seoul? It has been learned in the Olympic trials this week that Salters isn't even king of his own castle at Ft. Bragg, N.C. At the Salters residence, Tachi is in charge.
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SPORTS
July 11, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
The Army's Four Horsemen are still alive, and on their way to play the strip in Las Vegas. They'll be accompanied by eight other U.S. Olympic boxing trials champions crowned here this weekend, including an angry little flyweight from Whittier, on a mission to reverse what he called a Sunday afternoon robbery in the oak-studded brown hills of northern California. The Four Horsemen remained intact Sunday, when super-heavyweight Robert Salters of Ft. Bragg, N.C.
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SPORTS
July 11, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
The Army's Four Horsemen are still alive, and on their way to play the strip in Las Vegas. They'll be accompanied by eight other U.S. Olympic boxing trials champions crowned here this weekend, including an angry little flyweight from Whittier, on a mission to reverse what he called a Sunday afternoon robbery in the oak-studded brown hills of northern California. The Four Horsemen remained intact Sunday, when super-heavyweight Robert Salters of Ft. Bragg, N.C.
SPORTS
July 9, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
The question hanging over Robert Salters' bid to become the U.S. Olympic boxing team's super-heavyweight is basically this: How can a guy who is afraid of his own dog possibly be expected to make the Olympic boxing team, much less win a medal at Seoul? It has been learned in the Olympic trials this week that Salters isn't even king of his own castle at Ft. Bragg, N.C. At the Salters residence, Tachi is in charge.
SPORTS
April 1, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
In two major upsets, a world champion and a fast-rising super-heavyweight prospect were beaten in the semifinals of the National Amateur Boxing Championships at the U.S. Olympic Training Center Thursday night. The upsets: --Kelcie Banks, 22-year-old world champion featherweight from Houston, viewed by almost everyone in amateur boxing as a lock for the Olympic team this year, lost a 3-2 decision to a little-known high school junior from St. Louis, Carl Daniels.
SPORTS
July 6, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Eight of 12 national champions won on the opening day of the U.S. Olympic boxing team trials tournament Tuesday, and a proud but worried mother and father from Washington were spared the agony of having to watch their two sons fight each other for an Olympic team berth.
SPORTS
April 2, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
When the 100th U.S. Amateur Boxing Championships began Monday, it shaped up as a tuneup for the Olympic team trials for two world champions and a super-heavyweight prospect from New York. But by the time they reached the finals Friday night at the Broadmoor Hotel's 2,500-seat hockey rink, it looked more like a Mr. Teen-Age America contest. In the 12 championship bouts, there were seven battling teens--a 16-year-old, four 17-year-olds and two 18-year-olds. When featherweight Carl Daniels of St.
SPORTS
July 7, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
One of America's most decorated amateur boxers was knocked out of the Olympic trials Wednesday night in a semifinal bantamweight upset at the Concord Hilton Hotel. Michael Collins, a solid favorite for the 1988 Olympic team from La Porte, Tex., was beaten by Kennedy McKinney, a Killeen, Tex., truck driver, who crawled off the mat to register a 4-1 decision. Collins knocked down McKinney early in the second round, then inexplicably abandoned his smooth, upright boxing style.
SPORTS
July 16, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Four years ago, several thousand amateur boxers who watched the class of 1984 win nine gold medals at the Los Angeles Olympics set out on the road of dreams, aspiring to gold medals of their own. This weekend, the road leads inside Caesars Palace Pavilion, where the Olympic team selection process is down to 23 boxers. This afternoon and Sunday--if necessary--they will finish paring themselves to the final 12.
SPORTS
April 1, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
In two major upsets, a world champion and a fast-rising super-heavyweight prospect were beaten in the semifinals of the National Amateur Boxing Championships at the U.S. Olympic Training Center Thursday night. The upsets: --Kelcie Banks, 22-year-old world champion featherweight from Houston, viewed by almost everyone in amateur boxing as a lock for the Olympic team this year, lost a 3-2 decision to a little-known high school junior from St. Louis, Carl Daniels.
SPORTS
July 10, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Four summers ago, when amateur boxing people began gathering in Fort Worth for the 1984 Olympic boxing trials, everyone was hearing the same rumor: "Wait'll you see the 17-year-old heavyweight out of New York . . . very inexperienced, but a real talent . . . name is Tyson." Saturday, on U.S. Army Day in the finals of the 1988 Olympic trials at the Concord Pavilion, it seemed as if another heavyweight prospect had been dropped on the boxing scene. After Saturday, Ray Mercer is no longer a rumor.
SPORTS
July 8, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
When he's on, Kelcie Banks is the best amateur boxer in the United States. For a boxing purist, the 6-foot 125-pound stringbean is, most of the time, a symphony of smooth, gliding movement with a quick, crackling right jab. But Banks is sometimes not on. Thursday night in the semifinals of the Olympic trials tournament, he was off. And so he's out--for the time being, at least--of the 1988 Olympic picture.
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