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Robert Schumann

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January 6, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
It's been only a couple of decades since we started hearing the symphonies of Robert Schumann pretty much as he wrote them, in what 19th-Century scholars and interpreters found his reprehensible orchestration: the heavy-footed brass, the gauche doublings (say, winds and strings fortissimo at the same time, in the same register), the unnecessary reinforcement of the string basses by bassoons and trombones, etc.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Sherry Stern, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
In the world of classical music, Clara Schumann's husband, Robert, is widely known. Yet Clara was not just wife and mother, but a virtuoso pianist.  Clara is getting worldwide attention Thursday, on the occasion of her 193rd birthday, with a Google Doodle. Though Robert was 10 years older than Clara, her career started flourishing before his. She was born Clara Josephine Wieck in Leipzig, Germany. Her music-teacher father taught her to play piano and she was performing by age 9. INTERACTIVE: Fall Arts Preview Around that time, Robert Schumann was in the early stages of a musical career and took piano lessons from Clara's father.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
He spent too much time sitting alone in bars, drinking beer with his face to the wall. He fell for an underage girl whose father disapproved of his bohemian ways, and between smoking, brooding and picking up a venereal disease during his reckless youth, his life's wild swings brought him to an early grave. FOR THE RECORD: 'Music and the Mind' program: An article in last Sunday's Arts & Books section about a coming Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra program titled "Music and the Mind" referred to Robert Schumann's "cheerier, early Violin Quartet in E Flat Major.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Clara Schumann might not be a household name today, but in her heyday she was the toast of Europe -- known as the "Priestess" and the "Queen of the Piano. " This explains why she's honored with Thursday's benchmark of cultural relevancy: A Google Doodle commemorating what would have been her 193rd birthday. The German composer and classical musician died in 1896 following a career that spanned more than six decades--and bucked societal conventions of the time. Among the obstacles facing Schumann: An overbearing father who recognized her genius, and then tried to block her marriage to famed composer Robert Schumann.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Clara Schumann might not be a household name today, but in her heyday she was the toast of Europe -- known as the "Priestess" and the "Queen of the Piano. " This explains why she's honored with Thursday's benchmark of cultural relevancy: A Google Doodle commemorating what would have been her 193rd birthday. The German composer and classical musician died in 1896 following a career that spanned more than six decades--and bucked societal conventions of the time. Among the obstacles facing Schumann: An overbearing father who recognized her genius, and then tried to block her marriage to famed composer Robert Schumann.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | From Reuters
The manuscript of a Schumann symphony, lost for more than 50 years, was sold at auction for a record $2.3 million in London on Thursday. It was a record not just for a manuscript by Robert Schumann but for any 19th-Century score, Sotheby's auction house said. It said the manuscript of the German Romantic composer's second symphony, written in 1846-47, was bought by Robin Lehman and his wife in New York City in a telephone bid through a dealer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Robert Schumann serves, in music history, as the model of the early Romantic--dreamy, poetic, melancholic, impulsive, obsessive, besotted by love and a bit dotty. He split his personality and imagined himself as protagonist in some sprawling Romantic novel by Jean Paul or E.T.A. Hoffmann. Manic-depressive, he was restive, heroic Florestan one minute, ruminating Eusebius the next; it is with these character names that he sometimes signed his music, depending upon its mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Sherry Stern, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
In the world of classical music, Clara Schumann's husband, Robert, is widely known. Yet Clara was not just wife and mother, but a virtuoso pianist.  Clara is getting worldwide attention Thursday, on the occasion of her 193rd birthday, with a Google Doodle. Though Robert was 10 years older than Clara, her career started flourishing before his. She was born Clara Josephine Wieck in Leipzig, Germany. Her music-teacher father taught her to play piano and she was performing by age 9. INTERACTIVE: Fall Arts Preview Around that time, Robert Schumann was in the early stages of a musical career and took piano lessons from Clara's father.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Hector Berlioz often pondered his "disease of isolation." Hugo Wolf described "streams of fire" running through his veins. Robert Schumann carefully chronicled in his diaries an unending series of violent mood swings, observing, "If we musicians live so often . . . on sunny heights, the sadness of reality cuts all the deeper. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
He spent too much time sitting alone in bars, drinking beer with his face to the wall. He fell for an underage girl whose father disapproved of his bohemian ways, and between smoking, brooding and picking up a venereal disease during his reckless youth, his life's wild swings brought him to an early grave. FOR THE RECORD: 'Music and the Mind' program: An article in last Sunday's Arts & Books section about a coming Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra program titled "Music and the Mind" referred to Robert Schumann's "cheerier, early Violin Quartet in E Flat Major.
NEWS
September 18, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1856, the German Romantic composer Robert Schumann died in an insane asylum. He was 46. It is easy to see Schumann as a tragic figure, as indeed he was in many respects: insanity, obscurity and early death.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Robert Schumann serves, in music history, as the model of the early Romantic--dreamy, poetic, melancholic, impulsive, obsessive, besotted by love and a bit dotty. He split his personality and imagined himself as protagonist in some sprawling Romantic novel by Jean Paul or E.T.A. Hoffmann. Manic-depressive, he was restive, heroic Florestan one minute, ruminating Eusebius the next; it is with these character names that he sometimes signed his music, depending upon its mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | From Reuters
The manuscript of a Schumann symphony, lost for more than 50 years, was sold at auction for a record $2.3 million in London on Thursday. It was a record not just for a manuscript by Robert Schumann but for any 19th-Century score, Sotheby's auction house said. It said the manuscript of the German Romantic composer's second symphony, written in 1846-47, was bought by Robin Lehman and his wife in New York City in a telephone bid through a dealer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1993 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The rumors about Clara Schumann--that's Robert's wife--and Johannes Brahms have been flying for at least a century. Even the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, which many feel to be the final word on all matters musical, falls just short of providing a definitive statement: Brahms' "veneration for Clara Schumann was undoubtedly a deep emotion (that) was reciprocated, to judge by her jealousy of Elisabeth von Herzogenberg . . . many years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
It's been only a couple of decades since we started hearing the symphonies of Robert Schumann pretty much as he wrote them, in what 19th-Century scholars and interpreters found his reprehensible orchestration: the heavy-footed brass, the gauche doublings (say, winds and strings fortissimo at the same time, in the same register), the unnecessary reinforcement of the string basses by bassoons and trombones, etc.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
When he was last in the Los Angeles area, nine years and one month ago, Anton Kuerti played one of the more memorable programs of that season, a Schubert recital of exceptional stylistic authority and splendid sound profile. Why, then, hasn't he been back before now? "Well, ah, the business of music in North America," the 47-year-old pianist said in a telephone interview from his home in Toronto, "is, well, a Byzantine complex."
NEWS
September 18, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1856, the German Romantic composer Robert Schumann died in an insane asylum. He was 46. It is easy to see Schumann as a tragic figure, as indeed he was in many respects: insanity, obscurity and early death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
When he was last in the Los Angeles area, nine years and one month ago, Anton Kuerti played one of the more memorable programs of that season, a Schubert recital of exceptional stylistic authority and splendid sound profile. Why, then, hasn't he been back before now? "Well, ah, the business of music in North America," the 47-year-old pianist said in a telephone interview from his home in Toronto, "is, well, a Byzantine complex."
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