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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1989
About 1,800 people are attending the National Society of Fund Raising Executives international conference, which opened Sunday at the Disneyland Hotel and continues through Wednesday. Robert Seiple, president of World Vision of Monrovia, is scheduled to speak to the delegates at today's noon luncheon. On Tuesday, the society will present its 1989 Awards for Philanthropy. The award for outstanding fund-raising executive will go to Ernest W. Wood, vice president for development of the Russ Reid Co. of Pasadena.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In an era in which ethnic conflicts and religious animosities break out with disturbing regularity, Robert Seiple might be called America's foot soldier on the front lines of the holy wars. Five weeks ago, he became America's first ambassador at large for international religious freedom, a post created by the International Religious Freedom Act, which Congress passed in October in the hope of making the battle against religious persecution a more important part of U.S. foreign policy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In an era in which ethnic conflicts and religious animosities break out with disturbing regularity, Robert Seiple might be called America's foot soldier on the front lines of the holy wars. Five weeks ago, he became America's first ambassador at large for international religious freedom, a post created by the International Religious Freedom Act, which Congress passed in October in the hope of making the battle against religious persecution a more important part of U.S. foreign policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1989
About 1,800 people are attending the National Society of Fund Raising Executives international conference, which opened Sunday at the Disneyland Hotel and continues through Wednesday. Robert Seiple, president of World Vision of Monrovia, is scheduled to speak to the delegates at today's noon luncheon. On Tuesday, the society will present its 1989 Awards for Philanthropy. The award for outstanding fund-raising executive will go to Ernest W. Wood, vice president for development of the Russ Reid Co. of Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1986 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
Robert A. Seiple, a college president, former athletic director and Marine Corps captain decorated for combat in Vietnam, has been named the new president of World Vision. Seiple, 44, will succeed retiring president Ted W. Engstrom, 70, next July 1 in administering the U.S. ministries of the giant Monrovia-based Christian relief, development and evangelism agency. World Vision, which serves about 15 million needy people in 90 nations, has a current annual budget of more than $237 million.
NEWS
May 7, 1992
World Vision, a Monrovia-based Christian international relief and development organization, has committed $1.2 million to fight poverty in inner-city Los Angeles, including $100,000 for immediate relief following last week's rioting. The money will be used to assist homeless families and provide job training, parent-child education mentoring and counseling for the next 16 months, World Vision President Robert Seiple said. Donors may contact World Vision at (800) 423-4200.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992
Monrovia-based World Vision has been selected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to administer a food relief program worth $7.5 million in the republic of Armenia, it was announced Thursday. The relief aid includes $5.2 million of powdered milk, beans and vegetable oil earmarked for 300,000 Armenians suffering from severe food and energy shortages, including refugees from the war with neighboring Azerbaijan. Another $2.
NEWS
February 16, 1992
World Vision, a Christian international relief and development agency, has received a $100,000 Mobil Corp. grant for aid to Ethiopia. The money will help the Monrovia-based agency provide food, agricultural supplies and health assistance to 400,000 Ethiopians this year, World Vision president Robert A. Seiple said. The nonprofit agency has more than 6,400 aid projects in over 90 countries.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
As thousands of U.S. troops headed toward Somalia on Sunday, Southern California relief workers voiced the hope that intensified scrutiny of the Somali crisis will boost donations for the drought-ravaged nation. "When we first began to shift our attention to what was happening in Somalia, we had a spurt of donations, but that had dropped off," said Barbara Wilks, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles chapter of the American Red Cross.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1988
Officials of Monrovia-based World Vision International plan to close their offices in Sudan next week after being expelled by the government of the northeast African nation. The Christian relief organization was not given specific reasons for its expulsion from the continent's largest nation, according to the organization's U.S. president, Robert A. Seiple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1986 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
Robert A. Seiple, a college president, former athletic director and Marine Corps captain decorated for combat in Vietnam, has been named the new president of World Vision. Seiple, 44, will succeed retiring president Ted W. Engstrom, 70, next July 1 in administering the U.S. ministries of the giant Monrovia-based Christian relief, development and evangelism agency. World Vision, which serves about 15 million needy people in 90 nations, has a current annual budget of more than $237 million.
OPINION
March 6, 1988
Robert Seiple of World Vision wrote movingly abut the current famine in Ethiopia (Op-Ed Page, Feb. 17). His prescription for long-term development projects which would mitigate the effects of the next drought are basically on target: a market-oriented approach towards agricultural production, an "early-warning system" for potentially disastrous drought conditions, improved response time for both government and international organization assistance, cooperation...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1992
Much attention is being focused this week in Rio de Janeiro on the health of the Earth. Scientists, sociologists, politicians and even clergy are asking heavy questions: How seriously is mankind affecting its own future on Earth? Are we irrevocably poisoning the natural resources to which we cling so tentatively? Are we irreversibly sacrificing our children's future for the transitory pleasures of technology and modern convenience?
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