Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Shaw
IN THE NEWS

Robert Shaw

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
Robert Shaw, noted choral director and music director emeritus of the Atlanta Symphony, has been appointed principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony. The 73-year-old musician had already been scheduled to conduct three concerts Dec. 1-3, a program of three large choral works with the orchestra and the San Diego Master Chorale. Shaw, a native Californian, launched his musical career in the 1940s as founder and director of the Robert Shaw Chorale.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Jason Kehe
Robert Shaw, a piano teacher and former punk-rock musician, spent years telling his friends that Los Angeles was not a piano-friendly town. If a club or restaurant owned a piano -  a rarity to begin with -  they were just dormant keyboards. Opportunities to jam in public with friends were few. So when his girlfriend walked him down to the Santa Monica Pier one April day, where a colorful piano was sitting in the open for anyone to play, Shaw experienced a bit of heaven. He rushed over and performed “Rhapsody in Blue,” attracting a small crowd in the process.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the concert hall, Robert Shaw keeps company with the loftiest creations of Western culture. The Brahms Requiem, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, Handel's "Messiah," to name a few. But, off the podium, the dean of American choral conductors and principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony sports a sense of humor that would have the raised the eyebrows of his Protestant minister father and grandfather.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Illumination, not farewell, is the message of this final recording in Shaw's long career as master musician--he died in January 1999, just two months after the sessions. This touching and resplendent document--on two CDs, totaling one hour and 25 minutes--reveals the greatness of a work long neglected in this country and one that Shaw himself discovered only a few years ago.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Shaw, who represented the epitome of choral conducting for six decades and has been called the dean of American choral conducting, died Monday. He was 82. Shaw, also known for his work with orchestras, died in a hospital in New Haven, Conn., after suffering a stroke Sunday night. Shaw had gone from his Atlanta home to New Haven to see "Endgame," a play directed by his son Thomas as his senior project at Yale University.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is still too early to know what place Leonard Bernstein will hold in the pantheon of American composers. Now that the vibrant, ever-controversial persona is gone, only his music can properly argue his cause. Friday night at Copley Symphony Hall, Robert Shaw conducted the San Diego Symphony in an all-Bernstein program that made an eloquent case for the composer's intellectual breadth and musical vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choral director Robert Shaw, who serves as principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony, was chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts, along with architect Robert Venturi, who designed a proposed addition for the La Jolla-based Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Robert Shaw ascends the podium, he communicates a certaingrandeur that is difficult to ignore. Gravity and authority precede him. Perhaps his reputation and his august figure conspire to evoke such audience anticipation. Thursday night at Copley Symphony Hall, the San Diego Symphony principal guest conductor guided the orchestra through his lofty but overly restrained view of Schubert's Ninth Symphony ("The Great").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
The challenges of presenting a monument such as Beethoven's Ninth Symphony are legion. Too much reverence may induce somnolence, but a jaunty approach risks reducing lofty aspirations to catchy jingles. Even in its own era, the "Choral" Symphony's naive, homely themes invited critical derision as mere back alley tunes. It takes a seasoned hand to shape this mighty, sprawling work and probe the depth of the composer's vision.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Shaw, who represented the epitome of choral conducting for six decades and has been called the dean of American choral conducting, died Monday. He was 82. Shaw, also known for his work with orchestras, died in a hospital in New Haven, Conn., after suffering a stroke Sunday night. Shaw had gone from his Atlanta home to New Haven to see "Endgame," a play directed by his son Thomas as his senior project at Yale University.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | John Henken
These discs together reveal a generation of choral change. Much esteemed in its day, the Robert Russell Bennett arrange- ments of 17 traditional carols on "Many Moods," a 1963 reissue, now sound almost comically inflated--bright, brassy and self-conscious--particularly in comparison with the contemplative "Angels on High," which is all soft sophistication. "Angels" contains luminous accounts of Morten Lauridsen's "O magnum mysterium," Britten's "Hymn to the Virgin" and Franz Biebl's "Ave Maria."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997 | LISA FERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Columbia Los Robles Hospital has tapped an executive from its parent company as its new chief executive officer, a man with 20 years' experience in medical services and hospital management. Robert C. Shaw, who begins his new post Sept. 29, was most recently chief operational officer for Columbia/HCA's Pacific Division, overseeing the operational strategies of 17 hospitals in California. "We're really excited to have him," Los Robles Hospital spokeswoman Kris Carraway said.
NEWS
April 20, 1996
Robert J. Shaw, 79, radio and television scriptwriter who worked on "Dallas." Born in Pewaukee, Wis., Shaw studied creative writing at the University of Wisconsin with such authors as Sinclair Lewis. In 1940, Shaw sold his first radio show, "Front Page Farrell," to NBC. He scripted other popular radio dramas of the period, including "Stella Dallas," "The Guiding Light," "Search for Tomorrow" and all 572 episodes of the long-running "Mr. District Attorney."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choral director Robert Shaw, who serves as principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony, was chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts, along with architect Robert Venturi, who designed a proposed addition for the La Jolla-based Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When three stars turn up to testify before Congress, it's enough to cause a traffic jam on Capitol Hill. When clusters of them showed up in Washington this weekend for the Kennedy Center Honors--the nation's highest tribute to performing artists--Washington cleared the streets and turned out in its best tuxedos and dresses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Jason Kehe
Robert Shaw, a piano teacher and former punk-rock musician, spent years telling his friends that Los Angeles was not a piano-friendly town. If a club or restaurant owned a piano -  a rarity to begin with -  they were just dormant keyboards. Opportunities to jam in public with friends were few. So when his girlfriend walked him down to the Santa Monica Pier one April day, where a colorful piano was sitting in the open for anyone to play, Shaw experienced a bit of heaven. He rushed over and performed “Rhapsody in Blue,” attracting a small crowd in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When three stars turn up to testify before Congress, it's enough to cause a traffic jam on Capitol Hill. When clusters of them showed up in Washington this weekend for the Kennedy Center Honors--the nation's highest tribute to performing artists--Washington cleared the streets and turned out in its best tuxedos and dresses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the concert hall, Robert Shaw keeps company with the loftiest creations of Western culture. The Brahms Requiem, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, Handel's "Messiah," to name a few. But, off the podium, the dean of American choral conductors and principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony sports a sense of humor that would have the raised the eyebrows of his Protestant minister father and grandfather.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is still too early to know what place Leonard Bernstein will hold in the pantheon of American composers. Now that the vibrant, ever-controversial persona is gone, only his music can properly argue his cause. Friday night at Copley Symphony Hall, Robert Shaw conducted the San Diego Symphony in an all-Bernstein program that made an eloquent case for the composer's intellectual breadth and musical vision.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|