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Robert Shrum

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1988 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
For months it has been a sliver just under the skin of Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy, Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate and a man proud of his record on the environment. On Tuesday, McCarthy fessed up to the irritation. He said members of his campaign team had crossed him up on an issue he cared a great deal about.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1988 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
For months it has been a sliver just under the skin of Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy, Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate and a man proud of his record on the environment. On Tuesday, McCarthy fessed up to the irritation. He said members of his campaign team had crossed him up on an issue he cared a great deal about.
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NEWS
January 20, 2000 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several heavy-hitting Washington, D.C., political strategists are jumping aboard a new Silicon Valley political Web site designed to offer information to the public and give candidates a way to raise funds and campaign online. Grassroots.com includes on its board of advisors John H. Sununu, former chief of staff for President Bush; former Clinton White House press secretary Mike McCurry; and Vice President Al Gore's current media consultant, Robert Shrum, among others.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Book party on Monday night at Neiman Marcus for first-time novelist and current bicoastalist (L.A./Washington, D.C.) Marylouise Oates. A former social columnist and reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Oates veers far from the social whirl in "Making Peace" (Warner Books) to write about the '60s anti-war movement. (In a former life, Oates was a press aide to Sen. Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign and worked for the Vietnam Moratorium.) Author tranquillity rating: Low.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Democratic U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston has decided to get the jump on the Republicans before they can choose his opponent in the June 3 primary by going on television next month to "define the issues." Cranston has only token opposition in the Democratic primary. His manager, Darry Sragow, said, "We have always planned to run our own race irrespective of the Republicans. This is an ideal time to underscore the differences between Alan Cranston and the entire Republican field."
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
The Wolfman is mad. And he says to Alan Cranston, "I'm gonna getcha." It all started when Robert Shrum and David Doak, who make TV commercials for Democratic Sen. Cranston's reelection campaign, were looking for one more ad to draw attention to the inconsistent stands that Cranston's Republican opponent, Rep. Ed Zschau, has taken on some issues. Why not "Ed Zschau's greatest flip-flops?" they mused as they brainstormed late one night in Washington.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
A consultant who helped make Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston's television commercials in the recent election said Tuesday that the cost of campaigns will continue to soar unless television stations are forced to offer much lower rates for political ads. "It is a constantly escalating process," Washington consultant Robert Shrum told a group of reporters in Los Angeles.
BOOKS
July 8, 2007
Fiction Nonfiction *--* Weeks on list 1. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini 6 (Riverhead: $25.95) Two Afghan women struggle to survive jihad, civil war and Taliban tyranny. 2. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan (Nan A. 4 Talese/Doubleday: $22) A couple face a cruel reality on their wedding night. 3. Lean Mean Thirteen by Janet Evanovich (St. 1 Martin's: $27.95) Bounty hunter Stephanie Plum is the prime suspect in her ex-husband's alleged murder. 4.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From The Times Washington Bureau
CULTURE 101: Perhaps the inside-the-Beltway problem has less to do with the real people who live here than the elected people who come here--and maintain their, uh, "unique" Beltway perspective long after leaving the nation's capital. Take, for example, the widely respected Warren B. Rudman, the New Hampshire Republican who retired from the Senate more than five years ago. The co-chairman of the anti-deficit Concord Coalition remains rather out of touch with popular culture.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
In case anybody is watching, California's U.S. Senate race will flicker across TV screens next week, fully nine months before the election, as the leading candidates, Republican Sen. Pete Wilson and Democratic challenger Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy, scramble to make the first, formative imprint on the voters. Their rush to television is a sign of the image problems two unglamorous campaigners anticipate in a year when voters will be thinking about a presidential race.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Democratic presidential contender Rep. Richard A. Gephardt denounced Reagan Administration foreign policy across the board Thursday in a speech to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, charging that Reagan "has almost nothing to show after almost seven years in power." "Where is their Marshall Plan, their Peace Corps, their opening to China, their Camp David Accord?" the Missouri congressman asked.
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