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NEWS
March 6, 1999 | Associated Press
Former postal worker Robert Shulman, 44, has been convicted of bludgeoning and dismembering three women in the state's first trial under a "serial killer" provision of a 1995 death penalty law. A sentencing portion of the trial begins March 15 for Shulman, who was convicted Thursday.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prostitutes led police to the Hicksville, N.Y., home of a postal worker who later confessed to beating five women to death, dismembering them and dumping their body parts in garbage bins, authorities said. Robert Shulman, 42, was charged with two counts of murder in the slayings of two prostitutes whose bodies were found on Long Island. Authorities said Shulman also confessed to killing three other prostitutes whose bodies were found in Brooklyn and Yonkers.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bolar Settles Warner-Lambert Suit: Bolar Pharmaceutical Co., the maker of generic drugs embroiled in a fraud scandal, has settled a lawsuit with Warner-Lambert Co. for $7 million. Warner-Lambert filed the suit against Bolar and its former president, Robert Shulman, in a dispute over Bolar's generic versions of three drugs made by Warner-Lambert's Parke-Davis division.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Shulman Sentenced to Prison: The former chairman of Bolar Pharmaceutical Co. was sentenced to five years in prison and ordered to pay a $1.25-million fine in the government's probe of fraud in the generic drug industry. Shulman, 59, pleaded guilty in November, 1991, to charges of conspiring to defraud the Food and Drug Administration, wire fraud and false statements to the FDA, and obstruction of a federal investigation. U.S. District Court Judge John R.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | Associated Press
A former postal worker Monday became the first person to be sentenced to death under the "serial killer" provision of New York's death penalty law. Robert Shulman, 45, was convicted in March of bludgeoning three women to death. A judge sentenced him under a provision in the 1995 death penalty law that calls for the execution of someone who kills three or more people within a two-year period as part of a common plan or in a similar fashion.
NEWS
October 8, 1989
The Food and Drug Administration wants a New York pharmaceutical manufacturer to recall an antibiotic used to treat urinary tract infections because it believes the company cheated on product safety tests, an FDA official said. An FDA probe found indications that Bolar Pharmaceutical substituted the brand name product Macrodantin for its generic version of the drug nitrofurantoin in tests to win product approval, said FDA spokesman Jeff Nesbit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have apparently solved a daunting puzzle about diabetes that could eventually lead to better ways to treat a disease that affects 10 million Americans. Researchers reported last week they have determined that most of the excess sugar in the blood of diabetics and non-diabetics is stored in the muscle as a substance known as glycogen--identifying for the first time the primary location of stored sugar.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Prostitutes led police to the home of a postal worker who later confessed to beating five women to death, dismembering them and dumping their body parts in garbage bins, authorities said. Robert Shulman, 42, was charged with two counts of murder in the slayings of two prostitutes whose bodies were found on Long Island. Authorities said Shulman also confessed to killing three other prostitutes whose bodies were found in Brooklyn and Yonkers.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1992 | JANE APPLEGATE
Bill Merry Sr. made some dramatic changes to save his 31-year-old ornamental iron company from extinction. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Nashville company's core business was making decorative iron pillars for carports and patios. Iron stair railings were also brisk sellers. But architectural tastes changed, and Merry was faced with the fact that homeowners began to prefer wood--not iron--railings. "We just had to look for other things to do," he said.
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