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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
WHEN it comes to doing the right thing, don't look for any cues from the entertainment business, not when Warner Music's top brass rakes in $21 million in salary and bonuses while firing 1,600 employees, and ex-con Martha Stewart gets a big payday for a new installment of "The Apprentice" while still under house arrest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
WHEN it comes to doing the right thing, don't look for any cues from the entertainment business, not when Warner Music's top brass rakes in $21 million in salary and bonuses while firing 1,600 employees, and ex-con Martha Stewart gets a big payday for a new installment of "The Apprentice" while still under house arrest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a regular contributor to The Times
Robert Simonds is rubbing his hands together, a tip-off that the comedy gods are smiling. "This stuff is gold," he says to a pair of screenwriters sitting in his office. "It makes the rest of the world play straight man to our comedian. We build to this big joke where he gets caught with a stash and gets fired--and it turns out to be oregano." Curled up on a chair in his office on the Universal Pictures lot, Simonds is rehearsing a pitch for a film called "Half Baked."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a regular contributor to The Times
Robert Simonds is rubbing his hands together, a tip-off that the comedy gods are smiling. "This stuff is gold," he says to a pair of screenwriters sitting in his office. "It makes the rest of the world play straight man to our comedian. We build to this big joke where he gets caught with a stash and gets fired--and it turns out to be oregano." Curled up on a chair in his office on the Universal Pictures lot, Simonds is rehearsing a pitch for a film called "Half Baked."
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through no desire of her own, Kathy McNamara came to be known as "the book banner from Banning." Colleagues kidded her about it, but most of the time, she bristled at the joke. It just wasn't funny. Censorship and the death of a friend never are. Against her better judgment, McNamara, the principal at Susan B. Coombs Middle School, had removed Maya Angelou's autobiography, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," from a required reading list.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A coalition of artists, executives and record companies are urging makers of compact discs to "Ban the Box"--the disposable plastic and paper packaging in which most CDs are sold. So far, Olivia Newton-John, Kris Kristofferson and The Grateful Dead, along with Rhino Records, Fantasy Records and Rykodisc, have lent their names to the group, which is calling for an end to the environmentally damaging packaging.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Billy Madison" looks as if it were made to fill the void left by Pee-wee Herman. We never needed Pee-wee more. Adam Sandler plays Billy Madison, a spoiled rich nudnik who stands to inherit the family business from his hotel tycoon father (Darren McGavin)--except Madison Sr. seems to think his jerky scion isn't up to it. For one thing, the only reason he graduated public school is because his father paid off the teachers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Just Married" is of interest only as a product of such generic blandness as to be absolutely airtight: not a whiff of originality or real life has been allowed to spoil its plastic perfection. Ashton Kutcher and Brittany Murphy are attractive and skilled performers as the film's newlyweds, but the movie is so mechanical it's like watching Barbie and Ken dolls going through the motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something vaguely subversive about comedian Norm Macdonald's insistence on depersonalizing everything and everyone. In his new movie "Dirty Work," he impersonally greets other characters with flat, under-descriptive monikers ("Hey, homeless guys"; "OK, building tenants"; "hey, fat lady").
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1998 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
The common wisdom on the school of Jerry Lewis-manque idiot comics is that they serve as whipping boys for the self-esteem-starved audiences of the X, Y or Z generations--that their film personae can make anyone feel good about themselves because they're so purposefully pathetic. But that's too glib.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Was it only a few years ago that John Travolta was a '70s movie sensation, an urban youth movie sex-idol who seemed to blend Brando's brooding with Presley's swagger? In "Shout" (citywide), looking a bit fleshy and tired, Travolta is already trying to pass the torch. But there's nobody to pick it up--at least in this witless, over-pretty dud of a youth musical.
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