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Robert Sledge

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999 | MARC WEINGARTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ben Folds, the leader of the North Carolina trio Ben Folds Five, is like the high school kid whose caustic exterior conceals a troubled inner life. If he doesn't suffer fools gladly, it's mostly because he can relate to their shortcomings. At the Hollywood Palladium on Thursday, Folds' songs gave voice to the meek and the obnoxious, but regardless of whom he was singing about, a kind of begrudging affection shone through his gleeful cynicism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS
What does the North Carolina trio's slick, antiseptic song cycle have to do with German mountaineer Reinhold Messner, a seasoned adventurer who in 1980 became the first solo climber to scale Mt. Everest without using bottled oxygen? Well, Messner's own books on his exploits have been called surprisingly dry and uninspiring, so perhaps wise-guy pianist-songwriter Ben Folds, drummer Darren Jessee and bassist Robert Sledge are mocking Messner with such banal musings as "Narcolepsy" and "Regrets."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS
In spite of the enduring popularity of such piano-pop icons as Elton John, you wouldn't expect a group like Ben Folds Five, a piano trio hailing from the indie-rock hotbed of Chapel Hill, N.C., to hold the potential for similar widespread appeal. But judging from how enthusiastically a mainstream Redondo Beach audience responded to the band's performance on Saturday at Club Caprice, singer-pianist Ben Folds just might become this generation's Billy Joel.
SPORTS
July 25, 1989 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Ram veterans reported to work Monday, although it was difficult not to notice a lot of missing parts in a proud and apparently priceless offensive line, which has been reduced to a two-picket fence. Center Doug Smith and tackle Jackie Slater arrived safe and sound. But now they're lonely. Missing from first-day meetings were starting left tackle Irv Pankey, starting right guard Duval Love, and valuable reserves Robert Cox and Tony Slaton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1998 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Returning to Southern California five months after captivating a South Bay club audience, the members of Ben Folds Five brought their cacophonous piano pop act to the Hollywood Palladium on Saturday, where the audience was more diverse and every bit as excited to see them. Rather than building gradually to a riveting frenzy like during its December show, this time the Chapel Hill, N.C.
SPORTS
August 15, 1989 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Holdouts, headaches and heartaches. Is it a training camp or a country song? Rams Coach John Robinson wonders as he starts a new week with a truckload of worries on his mind. Take Monday's changing of the guards, for instance. Robert Sledge, a free agent who apparently had seen enough, walked out of camp early in the day. Two temporary starters, Tony Slaton and Warren Wheat, were nicked in Saturday's game and needed the day off.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By Ben Folds' reckoning, there was no need to shoot the piano player. The instrument's bulky inconvenience--at least in its traditional, acoustic form--was enough to turn the rock keyboard hero into a dying breed. "It's just not logistically feasible. They go out of tune; you can't move 'em. They're impossible. It's a very rockin' instrument, but you can't sit on a street corner and sing with a piano. That's as close as I can come to a theory." Folds is entitled to have a theory.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Elysa Gardner
Ben Folds, the lead singer and pianist for the fast-rising rock group Ben Folds Five, is described by bandmate Robert Sledge as "the squarest guy I've ever met." Arriving for lunch at a midtown Manhattan restaurant--accompanied by the cherubic, wisecracking Sledge, who plays bass, and the band's drummer, Darren Jessee--the 31-year-old Folds does little to challenge this assessment.
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