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September 13, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Robert Smithson did not go to college. As a New Jersey teenager, he commuted to some classes at Manhattan's Art Students League and the Brooklyn Museum, but after high school he did not enroll in art school. He joined the Army Reserves instead, then bummed around the United States and Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By David Colker
Artist Nancy Holt's best-known work, "Sun Tunnels," is outdoors, huge and open to the public - but only a relatively small number of people have seen it in person. It sits on 40 acres of land she bought in a desolate part of the Great Basin Desert in northwest Utah, accessible only by dirt roads with no buildings in sight. There sit four massive concrete tubes, each weighing 22 tons and towering more than 9 feet tall. The tubes are precisely oriented to frame not only landscapes in the distance but also the ever-changing patterns of the sun and stars in the sky. By limiting what someone in a vast open space can see, Holt meant to make the universe more personal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Photography," artist Robert Smithson once said, "makes nature obsolete." A wonderfully bracing sense of what he had in mind will be found in "Robert Smithson: Photo Works," which opened Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Smithson, who died tragically young in a 1973 airplane crash when he was 35, had been a pioneer among sculptors who considered the actual landscape to be both the raw material and the physical site of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Utah's Great Salt Lake covers some 1,700 square miles, making it one of the largest such bodies of salt water around. Have you ever wondered exactly where, relative to other parts of that vast and peculiar lake, artist Robert Smithson built his landmark environmental sculpture "The Spiral Jetty" in 1970? With just a few clicks of your mouse, Google Earth would be happy to show you, thanks to a newly launched project in conjunction with a sprawling exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo warehouse space.
NEWS
December 9, 2004 | Christopher Knight
Robert Smithson: Whether one agrees with the assertion in the MOCA retrospective's catalog that "no other postwar American artist can be said to be as influential" as the late Robert Smithson, the effect his art and writing have had on art in the last 30 years is immense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By David Colker
Artist Nancy Holt's best-known work, "Sun Tunnels," is outdoors, huge and open to the public - but only a relatively small number of people have seen it in person. It sits on 40 acres of land she bought in a desolate part of the Great Basin Desert in northwest Utah, accessible only by dirt roads with no buildings in sight. There sit four massive concrete tubes, each weighing 22 tons and towering more than 9 feet tall. The tubes are precisely oriented to frame not only landscapes in the distance but also the ever-changing patterns of the sun and stars in the sky. By limiting what someone in a vast open space can see, Holt meant to make the universe more personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Utah's Great Salt Lake covers some 1,700 square miles, making it one of the largest such bodies of salt water around. Have you ever wondered exactly where, relative to other parts of that vast and peculiar lake, artist Robert Smithson built his landmark environmental sculpture "The Spiral Jetty" in 1970? With just a few clicks of your mouse, Google Earth would be happy to show you, thanks to a newly launched project in conjunction with a sprawling exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art's Little Tokyo warehouse space.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2002 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
In the first room of the Museum of Contemporary Art's concise and winning survey of work by Sam Durant, a suite of six color photographs from 1995 shows chairs tipped upside-down. Artlessly composed, with haphazard cropping and the glare of a flash creating hot spots and murky shadows in the prints, they look like tabloid photographs taken at a crime scene -- Weegee without the people. The chairs are surrogate victims. What's the crime? Most likely, the violent demise of Modernism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Several years of drought have caused the waters of the Great Salt Lake to recede hundreds of yards from shore, leaving a thick blanket of still whiteness all around. It looks like snow. Snow gives a bit when you walk on it, even if packed or icy, but this salt crust is nearly as hard as the black basalt rock beneath it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
When Robert Smithson, the 1960s-70s Earth artist, sketched "Floating Island to Travel Around Manhattan Island," he drew as if he were in New Jersey, looking across the Hudson River at the New York City skyline. He placed his island-on-a-barge in the middle of the river, but he made it more like a real island than the skyscraper-filled landscape behind it. To a contemporary observer, the drawing looks like a small version of Central Park, displaced and set adrift.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2005 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
When Robert Smithson, the 1960s-70s Earth artist, sketched "Floating Island to Travel Around Manhattan Island," he drew as if he were in New Jersey, looking across the Hudson River at the New York City skyline. He placed his island-on-a-barge in the middle of the river, but he made it more like a real island than the skyscraper-filled landscape behind it. To a contemporary observer, the drawing looks like a small version of Central Park, displaced and set adrift.
NEWS
December 9, 2004 | Christopher Knight
Robert Smithson: Whether one agrees with the assertion in the MOCA retrospective's catalog that "no other postwar American artist can be said to be as influential" as the late Robert Smithson, the effect his art and writing have had on art in the last 30 years is immense.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Several years of drought have caused the waters of the Great Salt Lake to recede hundreds of yards from shore, leaving a thick blanket of still whiteness all around. It looks like snow. Snow gives a bit when you walk on it, even if packed or icy, but this salt crust is nearly as hard as the black basalt rock beneath it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Robert Smithson did not go to college. As a New Jersey teenager, he commuted to some classes at Manhattan's Art Students League and the Brooklyn Museum, but after high school he did not enroll in art school. He joined the Army Reserves instead, then bummed around the United States and Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2002 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
In the first room of the Museum of Contemporary Art's concise and winning survey of work by Sam Durant, a suite of six color photographs from 1995 shows chairs tipped upside-down. Artlessly composed, with haphazard cropping and the glare of a flash creating hot spots and murky shadows in the prints, they look like tabloid photographs taken at a crime scene -- Weegee without the people. The chairs are surrogate victims. What's the crime? Most likely, the violent demise of Modernism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Photography," artist Robert Smithson once said, "makes nature obsolete." A wonderfully bracing sense of what he had in mind will be found in "Robert Smithson: Photo Works," which opened Thursday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Smithson, who died tragically young in a 1973 airplane crash when he was 35, had been a pioneer among sculptors who considered the actual landscape to be both the raw material and the physical site of their art.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1988
Concerning your article on Meyer Vaisman ("Hot Young Artist's Solo Exhibit Opens in La Jolla," Hilliard Harper, May 31) and this quote by Vaisman: "In the '70s, there wasn't that much of an interest in art on the part of collectors because of recessions and inflations and that sort of thing. So what artists started doing was to make works of art that only existed as installations or a work of art that only existed in the landscape like Robert Smithson did with his 'Spiral Jetty.' " I have a difficult time believing such a "hot" artist would make such a conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | Diane Haithman
A large-scale environmental artwork conceived but never realized by the late Cuban American artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres will be constructed for a retrospective of the artist's work to be exhibited at the 2007 Venice Biennale in Italy. Nancy Spector, curator of contemporary art and director of curatorial affairs at the Solomon R.
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