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Robert Spano

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
At Los Angeles Philharmonic concerts in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion this week and next, guest conductors born in 1961 and 1960, respectively, take over the podium occupied up to now in this new season by Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen (who was born in 1958).
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By David Ng
Given his last name and the fact that he's a Los Angeles-based classical-music composer, Adam Schoenberg has been asked a certain question more times than he cares to remember: Is he related to the late, great 20th century composer Arnold Schoenberg? "No, I'm not," said the 32-year-old Schoenberg with a rueful smile, as if sorry to disappoint. Seated on a couch in his L.A. home during a recent interview, he explained that he hails from rural Massachusetts and that he's a relatively new Angeleno, having moved here a few years ago with his wife.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Robert Spano is the former music director of the Brooklyn Philharmonic, where he was venturesome and fairly well liked, and current music director of the Atlanta Symphony, where he is less venturesome and very well liked. He is revered at Tanglewood for his devotion to student conductors and composers. He picked up a couple of Grammys this year for a moderately persuasive recording of Vaughan Williams' bombastic "A Sea Symphony."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Robert Spano, guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, has wide sympathies. He is an all-American Romantic, Modernist and Postmodernist. He doesn't look the other way at experimentalism, pop or jazz. Spano is music director of the Atlanta Symphony and the catapulting force for the Atlanta School of composers, a group of enterprising, eclectic Neo-Romantics who are increasingly trotted out to please timid audiences. On the other hand, Spano remains a valued and brilliant performer of probing, challenging and stylistically diverse music by John Adams, Osvaldo Golijov and Kaija Saariaho.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Hollywood Bowl summer--the season of delirious symphonies, communal picnics and merry social intercourse under the stars--is dwindling to a close. For some observers, the end doesn't come a hemidemisemiquaver too soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Robert Spano, guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, has wide sympathies. He is an all-American Romantic, Modernist and Postmodernist. He doesn't look the other way at experimentalism, pop or jazz. Spano is music director of the Atlanta Symphony and the catapulting force for the Atlanta School of composers, a group of enterprising, eclectic Neo-Romantics who are increasingly trotted out to please timid audiences. On the other hand, Spano remains a valued and brilliant performer of probing, challenging and stylistically diverse music by John Adams, Osvaldo Golijov and Kaija Saariaho.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a regular contributor to Calendar. and
Robert Spano is on the phone from Stockhausen country. That is, the young conductor is talking from his hotel room in Amsterdam, where two weeks before traveling to Los Angeles to conduct Rimsky and Rachmaninoff at the Hollywood Bowl, he is about to appear in one of the most acrobatic three-ring circus acts in music. Spano and conductors Oliver Knussen and Reinbert de Leeuw are at work on Karlheinz Stockhausen's "Gruppen."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2008
IN reading Mark Swed's polemic, "Tough Times Call for Some Tougher Music" [May 18], I found a number of his premises quite disturbing. Perhaps the most egregious is the very notion of a dumbed-down appreciation of music. To listen is, by definition, "to pay attention" -- inherently an intelligent act. There may be easy hearing, but there is no easy listening. To pay attention to the exquisite simplicity of some of the world's greatest music is by no means less intelligent than to be attentive to complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | Chris Pasles; Mark Swed; Daniel Cariaga; Richard S. Ginell
Schubert: Lieder With Orchestra Anne Sofie von Otter, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Quasthoff, baritone; Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Claudio Abbado, conductor (Deutsche Gramophon) *** 1/2 The interest here lies more in the orchestrations by composers other than Schubert than in the fine live performances of these songs. Schubert sets the standard first off with his limpid scoring of the Romanze from "Rosamunde." Others honor his genius more or less meticulously.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2008
IN reading Mark Swed's polemic, "Tough Times Call for Some Tougher Music" [May 18], I found a number of his premises quite disturbing. Perhaps the most egregious is the very notion of a dumbed-down appreciation of music. To listen is, by definition, "to pay attention" -- inherently an intelligent act. There may be easy hearing, but there is no easy listening. To pay attention to the exquisite simplicity of some of the world's greatest music is by no means less intelligent than to be attentive to complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Robert Spano is the former music director of the Brooklyn Philharmonic, where he was venturesome and fairly well liked, and current music director of the Atlanta Symphony, where he is less venturesome and very well liked. He is revered at Tanglewood for his devotion to student conductors and composers. He picked up a couple of Grammys this year for a moderately persuasive recording of Vaughan Williams' bombastic "A Sea Symphony."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | Chris Pasles; Mark Swed; Daniel Cariaga; Richard S. Ginell
Schubert: Lieder With Orchestra Anne Sofie von Otter, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Quasthoff, baritone; Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Claudio Abbado, conductor (Deutsche Gramophon) *** 1/2 The interest here lies more in the orchestrations by composers other than Schubert than in the fine live performances of these songs. Schubert sets the standard first off with his limpid scoring of the Romanze from "Rosamunde." Others honor his genius more or less meticulously.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2001 | ANDREA PERERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 6:30 on a Friday night and Bill, a 42-year-old TV writer from West Hollywood, is waiting to take an HIV test. This is his six-month ritual, what he does to give himself and his partners some peace of mind. But instead of waiting to hear his number called in a sterile hospital or clinic waiting room, Bill is sitting comfortably in a trendy West Hollywood thrift store. Swing music is blaring over the sound system and, in the back, a black motorcycle hangs from the ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Hollywood Bowl summer--the season of delirious symphonies, communal picnics and merry social intercourse under the stars--is dwindling to a close. For some observers, the end doesn't come a hemidemisemiquaver too soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By David Ng
Given his last name and the fact that he's a Los Angeles-based classical-music composer, Adam Schoenberg has been asked a certain question more times than he cares to remember: Is he related to the late, great 20th century composer Arnold Schoenberg? "No, I'm not," said the 32-year-old Schoenberg with a rueful smile, as if sorry to disappoint. Seated on a couch in his L.A. home during a recent interview, he explained that he hails from rural Massachusetts and that he's a relatively new Angeleno, having moved here a few years ago with his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2001 | ANDREA PERERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 6:30 on a Friday night and Bill, a 42-year-old TV writer from West Hollywood, is waiting to take an HIV test. This is his six-month ritual, what he does to give himself and his partners some peace of mind. But instead of waiting to hear his number called in a sterile hospital or clinic waiting room, Bill is sitting comfortably in a trendy West Hollywood thrift store. Swing music is blaring over the sound system and, in the back, a black motorcycle hangs from the ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a regular contributor to Calendar. and
Robert Spano is on the phone from Stockhausen country. That is, the young conductor is talking from his hotel room in Amsterdam, where two weeks before traveling to Los Angeles to conduct Rimsky and Rachmaninoff at the Hollywood Bowl, he is about to appear in one of the most acrobatic three-ring circus acts in music. Spano and conductors Oliver Knussen and Reinbert de Leeuw are at work on Karlheinz Stockhausen's "Gruppen."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
At Los Angeles Philharmonic concerts in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion this week and next, guest conductors born in 1961 and 1960, respectively, take over the podium occupied up to now in this new season by Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen (who was born in 1958).
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