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Robert Stanley Stufflebeam

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April 1, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
A third Marine security guard has been arrested in the expanding investigation of a sex-and-spy scandal at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the Pentagon said Tuesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Stanley Stufflebeam, who was assistant commander of the detachment of 28 Marine guards until last May, is being held in the brig at Camp Pendleton, Calif., on suspicion of "having associations with Soviet women on several occasions," said Robert Sims, the Pentagon's chief spokesman.
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NEWS
September 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Marine Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam was demoted from the rank of staff sergeant to sergeant Friday as punishment for his convictions on two misdemeanor counts of dereliction of duty. A military jury, which convicted the former Moscow embassy guard Thursday evening, gave Stufflebeam no prison sentence after deliberating about 1 1/2 hours. The court-martial judge, Marine Lt. Col. E. Dean Clark, had ruled earlier Friday that Stufflebeam be credited with 54 days on any sentence the jury recommended.
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NEWS
April 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A third Marine embassy guard who was arrested last month for alleged improper associations with Soviet women was released from the brig Tuesday on grounds that there was insufficient reason to keep him behind bars, the Pentagon said. But Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam was ordered to remain on the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., and is still considered a suspect, Pentagon spokesman Robert Sims said, adding that he could face formal charges later.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
A military jury on Thursday cleared Marine Staff Sgt. Robert Stufflebeam of charges that he had sex with Soviet prostitutes while serving as a guard at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow. The jury of five officers and three enlisted personnel also found Stufflebeam not guilty of charges that he lied to investigators and failed to report his alleged involvement with the Soviet prostitutes to his superiors.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Marine Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam was demoted from the rank of staff sergeant to sergeant Friday as punishment for his convictions on two misdemeanor counts of dereliction of duty. A military jury, which convicted the former Moscow embassy guard Thursday evening, gave Stufflebeam no prison sentence after deliberating about 1 1/2 hours. The court-martial judge, Marine Lt. Col. E. Dean Clark, had ruled earlier Friday that Stufflebeam be credited with 54 days on any sentence the jury recommended.
NEWS
July 9, 1987
A Marine accused of failing to report sexual relations with Soviet women while second in command of the security detail at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow will go on trial Sept. 8, a Marine Corps spokeswoman said. Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam, 25, of Bloomington, Ill., is the second Marine scheduled to face court-martial at the Quantico, Va., Marine base in the embassy sex and espionage scandal. Stufflebeam is not charged with espionage.
NEWS
September 9, 1987
Marine Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam, a former Moscow embassy guard charged with failing to report Soviet contacts and lying to military investigators, pleaded innocent as his court-martial opened. Stufflebeam, 25, of Bloomington, Ill., went on trial following a week of pretrial motions before the military judge handling the case at the Quantico, Va., Marine Corps Base. Stufflebeam faces nine counts that could result in a 14-year sentence.
NEWS
May 25, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Wesley Fox walked into the U.S. Post Office at Front Royal, Va., and joined the Marine Corps 37 years ago. He was 18. He had no intention of making the military his career. He just wanted to get into the Korean War, and he did. He is 55 now, a weathered, square-jawed old mustang who was an enlisted man for 16 years before he pinned on the gold bars of a second lieutenant during the Vietnam War.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
A military jury on Thursday cleared Marine Staff Sgt. Robert Stufflebeam of charges that he had sex with Soviet prostitutes while serving as a guard at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow. The jury of five officers and three enlisted personnel also found Stufflebeam not guilty of charges that he lied to investigators and failed to report his alleged involvement with the Soviet prostitutes to his superiors.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
They are called "the best of our finest," the elite of the Marine Corps. But, today, with a growing sex-and-spy scandal centering on military guards at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, serious questions are being raised about the decades-old practice of assigning young Marines to guard America's most sensitive diplomatic installations abroad.
NEWS
September 10, 1987
Prosecutors, opening their case in the court-martial of Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam, accused the former Marine guard of not only having sex with Soviet prostitutes but of leading his subordinates to bars to do the same. Stufflebeam, 25, of Bloomington, Ill., the former deputy commander of the guards at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, faces up to 14 1/2 years in prison for fraternizing with Soviet nationals.
NEWS
September 9, 1987
Marine Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam, a former Moscow embassy guard charged with failing to report Soviet contacts and lying to military investigators, pleaded innocent as his court-martial opened. Stufflebeam, 25, of Bloomington, Ill., went on trial following a week of pretrial motions before the military judge handling the case at the Quantico, Va., Marine Corps Base. Stufflebeam faces nine counts that could result in a 14-year sentence.
NEWS
May 25, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Wesley Fox walked into the U.S. Post Office at Front Royal, Va., and joined the Marine Corps 37 years ago. He was 18. He had no intention of making the military his career. He just wanted to get into the Korean War, and he did. He is 55 now, a weathered, square-jawed old mustang who was an enlisted man for 16 years before he pinned on the gold bars of a second lieutenant during the Vietnam War.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A third Marine embassy guard who was arrested last month for alleged improper associations with Soviet women was released from the brig Tuesday on grounds that there was insufficient reason to keep him behind bars, the Pentagon said. But Staff Sgt. Robert S. Stufflebeam was ordered to remain on the Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., and is still considered a suspect, Pentagon spokesman Robert Sims said, adding that he could face formal charges later.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
They are called "the best of our finest," the elite of the Marine Corps. But, today, with a growing sex-and-spy scandal centering on military guards at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, serious questions are being raised about the decades-old practice of assigning young Marines to guard America's most sensitive diplomatic installations abroad.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
A third Marine security guard has been arrested in the expanding investigation of a sex-and-spy scandal at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the Pentagon said Tuesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Stanley Stufflebeam, who was assistant commander of the detachment of 28 Marine guards until last May, is being held in the brig at Camp Pendleton, Calif., on suspicion of "having associations with Soviet women on several occasions," said Robert Sims, the Pentagon's chief spokesman.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | Associated Press
About half of the 28 Marine guards assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow have been flown to Frankfurt, West Germany, and are undergoing initial questioning by investigators looking into a sex-and-spy scandal, the Pentagon said today. Robert Sims, the Pentagon's chief spokesman, also said it is "likely" that the remaining guards assigned to the embassy will be replaced before Secretary of State George P. Shultz visits Moscow for arms control talks next week.
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