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February 24, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reaching back into the dark world of Cold War espionage, the FBI on Friday arrested a former soldier once assigned to the super-secret National Security Agency on charges of spying for the Soviet Union, plucking him out of an obscure life in rural Pennsylvania some 20 years after his alleged betrayal had ended. The FBI arrested Robert Stephan Lipka, 50, at his home in Manor Township, Pa.
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NEWS
July 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge ruled that former Army clerk Robert Lipka is competent to be tried on charges of Cold War spying for the Soviet Union. Lipka of Millersville, Pa., was arrested Feb. 23 and accused of taking secret documents from the National Security Agency headquarters at Ft. Meade, Md., between 1965 and 1967. The government said he sold them to Soviet agents for a total of $27,000.
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NEWS
July 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge ruled that former Army clerk Robert Lipka is competent to be tried on charges of Cold War spying for the Soviet Union. Lipka of Millersville, Pa., was arrested Feb. 23 and accused of taking secret documents from the National Security Agency headquarters at Ft. Meade, Md., between 1965 and 1967. The government said he sold them to Soviet agents for a total of $27,000.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his blue-green Chevy van three years ago, talking to an undercover FBI agent he believed to be a Russian intelligence official, Robert Lipka allegedly confided his reason for betraying his nation during one of the most frigid stages of the Cold War: "I worked strictly for money." The life Lipka led in Pennsylvania before FBI agents arrested him Friday on charges of espionage lends credence to that claim.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in his blue-green Chevy van three years ago, talking to an undercover FBI agent he believed to be a Russian intelligence official, Robert Lipka allegedly confided his reason for betraying his nation during one of the most frigid stages of the Cold War: "I worked strictly for money." The life Lipka led in Pennsylvania before FBI agents arrested him Friday on charges of espionage lends credence to that claim.
OPINION
October 18, 1998 | David Wise, David Wise is the author of "Nightmover: How Aldrich Ames Sold the CIA to the KGB for $4.6 Million."
In a London hotel room last month, a short man with a thick Russian accent and Slavic features handed his American visitor $9,000, along with thanks for the top-secret information the source had provided to the KGB in the past. The two men agreed to meet in a hotel at Dulles Airport early this month. The SVR, successor to the KGB, would like to reactivate the American spy, he was told. According to an affidavit filed in federal court in Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
February 24, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reaching back into the dark world of Cold War espionage, the FBI on Friday arrested a former soldier once assigned to the super-secret National Security Agency on charges of spying for the Soviet Union, plucking him out of an obscure life in rural Pennsylvania some 20 years after his alleged betrayal had ended. The FBI arrested Robert Stephan Lipka, 50, at his home in Manor Township, Pa.
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