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HOME & GARDEN
January 11, 2007 | Bettijane Levine
Every humble object in this book has won design awards, some are in the collections of major museums -- and most will bring a smile when you look at them because they're so darn cute. From Michael Graves' iconic teapot with a little bird that whistles ($135) to Karim Rashid's plastic, torso-shaped wastebasket called the Garbo ($12), every item here is the product of a great design mind.
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SPORTS
January 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Alabama fullback Robert Stewart was arrested Wednesday night and charged with breaking into a car during the school's basketball game with Kentucky and taking a sweat shirt and a jacket. Coach Bill Curry said he is aware of the arrest and is evaluating Stewart's status. "Robert has been a model citizen for us," the coach said. "He has never been in any trouble up to this point. This is a very serious matter, and we want to be sure of all the facts."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Bill Kohlhaase
Will Robert Stewart be the Pharoah Sanders of the 21st century? This quartet date, like "Judgement," Stewart's 1995 debut release on World Stage records, recalls Sanders' spiritual period of the late '60s, with its emphasis on droning modal frameworks, long, uncomplicated solos and robust tones. The devotional motif contrasts sharply with that of Stewart's previous Qwest recording "In the Gutta" and affords less opportunity for technical displays.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz, once derided as the devil's own music, found a place in the sanctuary of the First Lutheran Church in Glendale on a hot night last August when young tenor saxophonist Robert Stewart came down from Oakland for an unusual concert appearance. Dressed conservatively in a gray suit and blue tie, Stewart filled the chapel with his remarkably rich and reverent tenor tones.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1990 | Gregory Crouch, Times staff writer
Last month, President Bush signed into law the Clean Air Act of 1990, which some experts have touted as the most comprehensive legislation ever enacted to protect the environment. The law requires nearly every major industry to drastically cut its emissions of pollutants by the year 2000. The law also strengthens regulations regarding land and water pollution. The message to business is clear--clean up your act.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Bill Kohlhaase
Will Robert Stewart be the Pharoah Sanders of the 21st century? This quartet date, like "Judgement," Stewart's 1995 debut release on World Stage records, recalls Sanders' spiritual period of the late '60s, with its emphasis on droning modal frameworks, long, uncomplicated solos and robust tones. The devotional motif contrasts sharply with that of Stewart's previous Qwest recording "In the Gutta" and affords less opportunity for technical displays.
HOME & GARDEN
January 11, 2007 | Bettijane Levine
Every humble object in this book has won design awards, some are in the collections of major museums -- and most will bring a smile when you look at them because they're so darn cute. From Michael Graves' iconic teapot with a little bird that whistles ($135) to Karim Rashid's plastic, torso-shaped wastebasket called the Garbo ($12), every item here is the product of a great design mind.
BOOKS
November 1, 1992 | Robert Elegant, Elegant is a former foreign correspondent for The Times. His most recent book is "Pacific Destiny: The Rise of the East" (Crown/Avon)
Frank Gibney may well be the best interpreter of Japan to a wide public now writing in America, perhaps the entire world. His previous books depicting that key country of the Orient--warts, beauty spots, aberrations and all--are innovative, indeed trail-blazing, the work of a first-class journalist and scholar presented in prose at once nimble and eloquent.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Richard Lingeman, Lingeman, executive editor of the Nation, is author of a biography of Theodore Dreiser .
In his later years, Carl Sandbueg was probably the most visible and prosperous poet in America. His earnings and renown, however, owed more to his biography of Abraham Lincoln and his radio and television appearances than to his poetry. Penelope Niven's richly detailed, deeply sympathetic biography is welcome not least because it reminds us that Sandburg at his best was an authentic native poet in the Walt Whitman grain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz, once derided as the devil's own music, found a place in the sanctuary of the First Lutheran Church in Glendale on a hot night last August when young tenor saxophonist Robert Stewart came down from Oakland for an unusual concert appearance. Dressed conservatively in a gray suit and blue tie, Stewart filled the chapel with his remarkably rich and reverent tenor tones.
BOOKS
November 1, 1992 | Robert Elegant, Elegant is a former foreign correspondent for The Times. His most recent book is "Pacific Destiny: The Rise of the East" (Crown/Avon)
Frank Gibney may well be the best interpreter of Japan to a wide public now writing in America, perhaps the entire world. His previous books depicting that key country of the Orient--warts, beauty spots, aberrations and all--are innovative, indeed trail-blazing, the work of a first-class journalist and scholar presented in prose at once nimble and eloquent.
BOOKS
April 26, 1992 | Clark Blaise, Blaise directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. and
Indira Gandhi (1917-1984) is one of those rare political leaders about whom everything is documented yet very little is understood. As the daughter of India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, and granddaughter of pre-independence Congress Party president Motilal Nehru, she was born and raised in a fishbowl. The questions confronting a biographer are those of character and motivation, not raw fact.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Richard Lingeman, Lingeman, executive editor of the Nation, is author of a biography of Theodore Dreiser .
In his later years, Carl Sandbueg was probably the most visible and prosperous poet in America. His earnings and renown, however, owed more to his biography of Abraham Lincoln and his radio and television appearances than to his poetry. Penelope Niven's richly detailed, deeply sympathetic biography is welcome not least because it reminds us that Sandburg at his best was an authentic native poet in the Walt Whitman grain.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1990 | Gregory Crouch, Times staff writer
Last month, President Bush signed into law the Clean Air Act of 1990, which some experts have touted as the most comprehensive legislation ever enacted to protect the environment. The law requires nearly every major industry to drastically cut its emissions of pollutants by the year 2000. The law also strengthens regulations regarding land and water pollution. The message to business is clear--clean up your act.
BOOKS
December 2, 1990 | Jane A. Taubman, Taubman, professor of Russian at Amherst College, is the author of "A Life Through Poetry: Marina Tsvetaeva's Lyric Diary" (Slavica)
In Russia, history is politics. Today, as Russians struggle out of the Soviet period to the next stage in their history, each step demands judgments about (to rephrase Lenin) "What is to be undone?" Slavophile nationalists like Solzhenitsyn urge a return to Russia's pre-revolutionary historical course; Westernizers of the Sakharov school want to see her become a "normal" European democracy. Yet before they can move along either road, Walter Laqueur reminds us, Russians must exorcise the ghost of Stalin.
BOOKS
April 26, 1992 | Clark Blaise, Blaise directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. and
Indira Gandhi (1917-1984) is one of those rare political leaders about whom everything is documented yet very little is understood. As the daughter of India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, and granddaughter of pre-independence Congress Party president Motilal Nehru, she was born and raised in a fishbowl. The questions confronting a biographer are those of character and motivation, not raw fact.
BOOKS
December 2, 1990 | Jane A. Taubman, Taubman, professor of Russian at Amherst College, is the author of "A Life Through Poetry: Marina Tsvetaeva's Lyric Diary" (Slavica)
In Russia, history is politics. Today, as Russians struggle out of the Soviet period to the next stage in their history, each step demands judgments about (to rephrase Lenin) "What is to be undone?" Slavophile nationalists like Solzhenitsyn urge a return to Russia's pre-revolutionary historical course; Westernizers of the Sakharov school want to see her become a "normal" European democracy. Yet before they can move along either road, Walter Laqueur reminds us, Russians must exorcise the ghost of Stalin.
SPORTS
January 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Alabama fullback Robert Stewart was arrested Wednesday night and charged with breaking into a car during the school's basketball game with Kentucky and taking a sweat shirt and a jacket. Coach Bill Curry said he is aware of the arrest and is evaluating Stewart's status. "Robert has been a model citizen for us," the coach said. "He has never been in any trouble up to this point. This is a very serious matter, and we want to be sure of all the facts."
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