Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Stone
IN THE NEWS

Robert Stone

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By David L. Ulin
Fun With Problems Stories Robert Stone Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 196 pp., $24 The last decade or so has been challenging for Robert Stone. In the wake of his 1998 novel, "Damascus Gate" -- a millennial masterpiece set in Jerusalem -- he published two middling books, the novel "Bay of Souls" and the memoir "Prime Green," that may be most noteworthy for what they lack. Both traffic in the classic Stone motifs: God and dope, primarily. And both are suitably apocalyptic, looking at characters (and, in the case of "Prime Green," a counterculture)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Robert Stone has long been a big-picture novelist. "Dog Soldiers," which won a 1975 National Book Award, involves a "journalist of sorts" who tries to smuggle three kilos of heroin to Northern California from Saigon; the magnificent "Damascus Gate" (1998), meanwhile, offers a kaleidoscopic look at Jerusalem as millennial proving ground. And yet over the last 15 years or so Stone appears to have lost his way a bit, pulling back from these epic landscapes to offer stories that are narrower, even small.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Robert Stone has long been a big-picture novelist. "Dog Soldiers," which won a 1975 National Book Award, involves a "journalist of sorts" who tries to smuggle three kilos of heroin to Northern California from Saigon; the magnificent "Damascus Gate" (1998), meanwhile, offers a kaleidoscopic look at Jerusalem as millennial proving ground. And yet over the last 15 years or so Stone appears to have lost his way a bit, pulling back from these epic landscapes to offer stories that are narrower, even small.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2010
EVENTS Free Autry Admission for Kids The Autry invites kids ages 9 and under to celebrate Presidents Day with free all-day access to the museum's exhibits, including "The Art of Native American Basketry" and "Masters of the American West." Free craft activity included. Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Adults, $9; children, free. (323) 667-2000. www.autrynationalcenter .org . BOOKS Robert Stone Stone spent part of his childhood in an orphanage, was a member of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters and a journalist in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2010
EVENTS Free Autry Admission for Kids The Autry invites kids ages 9 and under to celebrate Presidents Day with free all-day access to the museum's exhibits, including "The Art of Native American Basketry" and "Masters of the American West." Free craft activity included. Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Adults, $9; children, free. (323) 667-2000. www.autrynationalcenter .org . BOOKS Robert Stone Stone spent part of his childhood in an orphanage, was a member of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters and a journalist in Vietnam.
BOOKS
March 1, 1992 | RICHARD EDER
Even the climate in "Outerbridge Reach" speaks corruption. It declares America's decline in loyalty, valor, love, republican virtue, individual pride, sound workmanship and the tang of the wilderness. Global consumer greed equals global warming; it has been the mildest winter in 100 years: "The ambiguity of the weather made time seem slack and the year spiritless." Such is the opening and theme of Robert Stone's novel about a man's ill-fated revolt against the moral entropy of the day.
BOOKS
April 20, 2003 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author of "Rainy Season: Haiti Since Duvalier" and the novel "Martyrs' Crossing."
The title of Robert Stone's new novel, "Bay of Souls," is evocative of other times, of thwarted adventurers on the high seas, of midnight attacks, of political intrigue and spies, of palm trees and beaches under the moon and important moral imperatives. Say "Bay of ... " to Americans of a certain age, and they'll know how to finish the phrase. Stone is one of our great living writers, and always an explosive and problematic one. He can set a scene like almost no one else.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a recent Tuesday afternoon, Le Meridien Hotel in Beverly Hills looks like a setting from a Robert Stone novel, a study in contrasts, in silence and movement, in darkness and light. In the back of the lobby, the hotel bar sprawls like some abandoned post-colonial outpost, empty except for CNN beaming the latest images from Iraq. A few feet away, a Japanese model poses before a fountain. As a photographer circles deliberately, like a predator, assistants jostle for position at his side.
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Like the protagonist of his last novel, "Outerbridge Reach," the principal characters in Robert Stone's short-story collection are single-hand sailors on a course to disaster. It is not because the gales and currents of their existence are too powerful. Stone's blighted heroic vision proposes extreme hardship as the measure of a sound life. Rather, it is because the sheets and timbers of their craft are unsound, owing to the sleaze and lack of standards in the world that fitted them out.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a hospital ward full of lunatics whose fantasies and delusions are strictly biblical: In one corner, "John the Baptist" is chattering excitedly to the wall, while "Moses" and "Samson," both heavily sedated, are nodding off in straitjackets. "Jesus" begins yet another sermon, until he's whisked away for blood tests. It might sound like a bad comedy skit, but such a ward exists in Jerusalem, where millions of people, some of them deranged, make pilgrimages every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By David L. Ulin
Fun With Problems Stories Robert Stone Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 196 pp., $24 The last decade or so has been challenging for Robert Stone. In the wake of his 1998 novel, "Damascus Gate" -- a millennial masterpiece set in Jerusalem -- he published two middling books, the novel "Bay of Souls" and the memoir "Prime Green," that may be most noteworthy for what they lack. Both traffic in the classic Stone motifs: God and dope, primarily. And both are suitably apocalyptic, looking at characters (and, in the case of "Prime Green," a counterculture)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Robert L. Stone, a former top executive at the Hertz Corp. who in the 1970s hired O.J. Simpson as a pitchman for the car rental giant, has died. He was 87. Stone died Wednesday of heart failure at his home in Boca Grande, his wife, Sheila Muldowny Stone, said Saturday. Stone became the chairman and chief executive of Hertz in 1972, when the company was a subsidiary of RCA Corp. It is now known as Hertz Global Holdings Inc.
BOOKS
January 7, 2007 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
MORE than any other American writer, Robert Stone is a product of the 1960s -- or maybe it's just that he was everywhere. Although he began the decade in New Orleans, his counterculture roots go back to Beat-era Times Square, where his wife, Janice, worked at the Seven Arts coffee shop, a meeting place for Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and Herbert Huncke.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
ON a warm afternoon in the summer of 1969, the novelist Robert Stone and two friends were hiking in the Big Sur wilderness, beginning a three-day trek to a Zen monastery 27 miles away. It was a transcendentally beautiful moment, with the ocean crashing below. Then a park ranger's radio crackled to life: Two armed fugitives, one wearing a German army uniform, were loose in the area and considered highly dangerous. Later that same night, U.S. astronauts began their historic moonwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Robert STONE hesitates to call himself a historian, although he does the historian's job, excavating facts from the remnants of modern memory. Yes, he majored in history at the University of Wisconsin, but his father, chair of the history department at Princeton University, was the real historian. Stone is our contemporary equivalent, a documentary filmmaker, and he has a particular fascination for the recent past.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Among the events that helped finish off '60s idealism, such as Watergate and the fall of Saigon, belongs the spectacular flameout of the Symbionese Liberation Army, the domestic terrorist group that earned its greatest notoriety for the kidnapping of newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst in 1974.
NEWS
May 29, 1988
Editor: Robert Epstein Design Director: Donald Burgess Copy Chief: David N, Blume Art Production: Robert Stone Editorial Director: Wallace Guenther
NEWS
May 21, 1989
EDITOR: Davilynn Furlow DESIGN DIRECTOR: Donald Burgess ASSISTANT EDITOR: Sherry Angel COPY COORDINATOR: David N. Blume RESEARCHER: Kathie Bozanich HISTORICAL CONSULTANT: Jim Sleeper OPERATIONS DIRECTOR: Jefferson G. Stillwell ART PRODUCTION: Robert Stone EDITOR, ORANGE COUNTY EDITION: Narda Zacchino EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: WALLACE GUENTHER
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a recent Tuesday afternoon, Le Meridien Hotel in Beverly Hills looks like a setting from a Robert Stone novel, a study in contrasts, in silence and movement, in darkness and light. In the back of the lobby, the hotel bar sprawls like some abandoned post-colonial outpost, empty except for CNN beaming the latest images from Iraq. A few feet away, a Japanese model poses before a fountain. As a photographer circles deliberately, like a predator, assistants jostle for position at his side.
BOOKS
April 20, 2003 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author of "Rainy Season: Haiti Since Duvalier" and the novel "Martyrs' Crossing."
The title of Robert Stone's new novel, "Bay of Souls," is evocative of other times, of thwarted adventurers on the high seas, of midnight attacks, of political intrigue and spies, of palm trees and beaches under the moon and important moral imperatives. Say "Bay of ... " to Americans of a certain age, and they'll know how to finish the phrase. Stone is one of our great living writers, and always an explosive and problematic one. He can set a scene like almost no one else.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|