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Robert Stramy

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BUSINESS
November 5, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors' "Mr. Fix-it," Robert Stramy, an executive vice president of the auto giant, sees a need for more democracy at the Daewoo Motor Co. plant he runs and in South Korea as a whole. "We've got to stop the bickering. We've got to get together--all of South Korea. We've got to understand that we're all together. That is the only way to be competitive," Stramy said at a recent luncheon at the Foreign Correspondents Club here.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors' "Mr. Fix-it," Robert Stramy, an executive vice president of the auto giant, sees a need for more democracy at the Daewoo Motor Co. plant he runs and in South Korea as a whole. "We've got to stop the bickering. We've got to get together--all of South Korea. We've got to understand that we're all together. That is the only way to be competitive," Stramy said at a recent luncheon at the Foreign Correspondents Club here.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1988
Ernest Schaefer, plant manager for General Motors' Van Nuys assembly plant for the last four years, has been promoted to director of manufacturing engineering for the Chevrolet-Pontiac-GM of Canada Group based in Detroit. On May 1, he will be replaced by Robert Stramy, currently director of the Ramos Arizpe Complex in Mexico, which assembles Chevrolet Celebrity cars.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
General Motors likely will not make a decision about the future of its Van Nuys assembly plant until this year's fourth quarter, a GM spokeswoman said. The plant, which employs about 3,800 workers, has been building GM's Chevrolet Camaros and Pontiac Firebirds since 1977, and is awaiting word on whether it will be awarded the contract to build the 1992 models of those cars. The Van Nuys plant's contract expires in 1991, and if it doesn't win the new Camaro and Firebird contract, the plant could be shut down.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
The future of General Motors Corp.'s assembly plant in Van Nuys, Southern California's last remaining auto factory, looks as clouded as ever. The plant is GM's sole builder of the Chevrolet Camaro and its sister sports car, the Pontiac Firebird. The cars' designs have changed little in the past several years and their sales have steadily declined over the same period.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1988 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
The new boss at the General Motors plant says he's not like the old boss. He's bossier. "I don't believe anybody would call me Uncle Bob," Robert Stramy, who took over Monday at the 3,800-worker factory in Van Nuys, said in an interview. "I have been called a benevolent dictator." Stramy, 47, replaced Ernest Schaefer, whom employees called Uncle Ernie.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1988 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
General Motors Corp. is considering moving production of Chevrolet Camaros and Pontiac Firebirds out of Van Nuys, a plan that could result in that plant's shutdown and the indefinite layoff of 3,400 workers. GM is deciding which of four assembly plants, including Van Nuys, will win the right to build the 1992 models of the Camaro and Firebird that would go into production in the summer of 1991.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1988 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
When General Motors' 3,800 employees report to work today at the company's Van Nuys assembly plant, the red-haired, freckle-faced plant manager they nicknamed Uncle Ernie will no longer be in the driver's seat. Ernest D. Schaefer is moving up to GM headquarters in Detroit, ending a particularly tough and highly publicized 3 1/2-year term as plant manager. He is being replaced by Robert Stramy, former manager of a GM manufacturing plant in Saltillo, Mexico, the Ramos Arizpe Complex.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While auto makers around the world are tightening their belts to adjust to shrinking markets and an overabundance of cars, South Korea's fledgling industry continues to build new factories. There's just one problem: They aren't selling enough cars. By year-end, Korean auto makers will have the capacity to build 2.2 million cars, up 17% from 1989. But the five auto makers will probably sell about 1.4 million cars, only slightly more than last year, analysts predict.
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