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Robert Sundance

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NEWS
August 11, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN
Robert Sundance, whose landmark class-action lawsuit helped reform how the LAPD and police departments nationwide contend with chronic alcoholics on skid rows, died Tuesday morning at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Los Angeles. The 66-year-old American Indian rights activist, profiled in View on Nov. 29, 1992, had battled bone cancer for 2 1/2 years. Sundance spent 40 years drinking and brawling on mean downtown streets from Minneapolis to Seattle.
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NEWS
May 30, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On anyone's scale, a Skid Row wino has to be one of America's least powerful people. Next time you see one of those ragged figures sprawled on a sidewalk, consider the improbability of what Robert Sundance did in 1975: With an eighth-grade education and nearly 500 arrests on his rap sheet, he sued the city and county of Los Angeles to demand better treatment of street alcoholics by police and the courts. And won.
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MAGAZINE
August 3, 1986 | R. W. DELLINGER, R. W. Dellinger is a Los Angeles writer.
In 1975, when Robert Sundance, a Hunkpapa Sioux Indian, and three other public inebriates filed a class-action suit challenging California's criminal law against public drunkenness, he was a Los Angeles Skid Row wino with no home or job. Today, he still lives downtown--but in a hotel room--and is the executive director of the Indian Alcoholism Commission of California.
NEWS
May 30, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On anyone's scale, a Skid Row wino has to be one of America's least powerful people. Next time you see one of those ragged figures sprawled on a sidewalk, consider the improbability of what Robert Sundance did in 1975: With an eighth-grade education and nearly 500 arrests on his rap sheet, he sued the city and county of Los Angeles to demand better treatment of street alcoholics by police and the courts. And won.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Sundance first saw the "Lights of Death" as a boy in the Mad Bear country of the Dakotas, along the Missouri River. When he encountered them again in downtown Los Angeles this year, they followed him into the Rosslyn Hotel, where he lives in a small room that overlooks a corner of Skid Row. Between those sightings, Sundance has lived as a modern warrior of sorts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, as the case of Sundance vs. Los Angeles Municipal Court was about to be filed, Robert Sundance himself was an alcoholic living on the streets of Skid Row. Today, his 10-year quest to get public drunkenness decriminalized reaches the California Supreme Court, where justices will hear oral arguments in what is already a landmark case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
As a citizen of an American Indian nation and a citizen of the United State--(a dual citizenship held by all Indians born in the U.S. since 1924)--I must say that it is difficult to be proud of the second half of that duality at a time there is continuing evidence and worldwide awareness of the fact that we are the only nation with a leader whose age exceeds his IQ. How can we Americans be anything but embarrassed when President Reagan, abroad in the Soviet Union on a delicate diplomatic mission, shows gross ignorance about the status and condition of American Indians (Part I, June 1)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN
It has been more than a decade since Robert Sundance, after years of living as an alcoholic on Skid Row, began his singular battle against the way the police and courts handle public drunks. The tall Sioux Indian, during more than 300 arrests for public drunkenness and in spite of an eighth-grade education, handwrote countless court petitions, calling for an end of what he called the "barbarous treatment" of alcoholics like himself.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN
Robert Sundance, whose landmark class-action lawsuit helped reform how the LAPD and police departments nationwide contend with chronic alcoholics on skid rows, died Tuesday morning at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Los Angeles. The 66-year-old American Indian rights activist, profiled in View on Nov. 29, 1992, had battled bone cancer for 2 1/2 years. Sundance spent 40 years drinking and brawling on mean downtown streets from Minneapolis to Seattle.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Sundance first saw the "Lights of Death" as a boy in the Mad Bear country of the Dakotas, along the Missouri River. When he encountered them again in downtown Los Angeles this year, they followed him into the Rosslyn Hotel, where he lives in a small room that overlooks a corner of Skid Row. Between those sightings, Sundance has lived as a modern warrior of sorts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN
It has been more than a decade since Robert Sundance, after years of living as an alcoholic on Skid Row, began his singular battle against the way the police and courts handle public drunks. The tall Sioux Indian, during more than 300 arrests for public drunkenness and in spite of an eighth-grade education, handwrote countless court petitions, calling for an end of what he called the "barbarous treatment" of alcoholics like himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
As a citizen of an American Indian nation and a citizen of the United State--(a dual citizenship held by all Indians born in the U.S. since 1924)--I must say that it is difficult to be proud of the second half of that duality at a time there is continuing evidence and worldwide awareness of the fact that we are the only nation with a leader whose age exceeds his IQ. How can we Americans be anything but embarrassed when President Reagan, abroad in the Soviet Union on a delicate diplomatic mission, shows gross ignorance about the status and condition of American Indians (Part I, June 1)
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer,
Once again, Sioux Indian Robert Sundance is on a lonely road, filing his own petition to challenge the state's criminal law against public drunkenness. This time, he has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court. Twelve years ago, Sundance was a chronic Skid Row alcoholic who, from local jail cells, started submitting handwritten court petitions to protest how public inebriates are handled by the criminal justice system.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Ruling in the widely watched case of Robert Sundance, the California Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld the constitutionality of a state law allowing arrests and criminal prosecutions for public drunkenness.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer,
Once again, Sioux Indian Robert Sundance is on a lonely road, filing his own petition to challenge the state's criminal law against public drunkenness. This time, he has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court. Twelve years ago, Sundance was a chronic Skid Row alcoholic who, from local jail cells, started submitting handwritten court petitions to protest how public inebriates are handled by the criminal justice system.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Ruling in the widely watched case of Robert Sundance, the California Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld the constitutionality of a state law allowing arrests and criminal prosecutions for public drunkenness.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 1986 | R. W. DELLINGER, R. W. Dellinger is a Los Angeles writer.
In 1975, when Robert Sundance, a Hunkpapa Sioux Indian, and three other public inebriates filed a class-action suit challenging California's criminal law against public drunkenness, he was a Los Angeles Skid Row wino with no home or job. Today, he still lives downtown--but in a hotel room--and is the executive director of the Indian Alcoholism Commission of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, as the case of Sundance vs. Los Angeles Municipal Court was about to be filed, Robert Sundance himself was an alcoholic living on the streets of Skid Row. Today, his 10-year quest to get public drunkenness decriminalized reaches the California Supreme Court, where justices will hear oral arguments in what is already a landmark case.
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