Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Symonds
IN THE NEWS

Robert Symonds

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Robert Barry Symonds, an actor who was a pivotal member of San Francisco's Actor's Workshop, one of the country's first regional theaters that helped quality drama migrate west in the 1950s from New York, has died. He was 80. Symonds, whose career encompassed Broadway as well as film and television, died Thursday of complications from prostate cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his family announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Robert Barry Symonds, an actor who was a pivotal member of San Francisco's Actor's Workshop, one of the country's first regional theaters that helped quality drama migrate west in the 1950s from New York, has died. He was 80. Symonds, whose career encompassed Broadway as well as film and television, died Thursday of complications from prostate cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his family announced.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
It begins with a kiss. Backstage before each performance of "Fighting Over Beverley," Priscilla Pointer walks over to her husband, Robert Symonds, and pecks him on the cheek. It's the sort of affection that Symonds' character in the play is fairly panting to receive. He comes on like a house afire, while Pointer--flattered but flustered--keeps backing away, trying to hide behind her teapot.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
It begins with a kiss. Backstage before each performance of "Fighting Over Beverley," Priscilla Pointer walks over to her husband, Robert Symonds, and pecks him on the cheek. It's the sort of affection that Symonds' character in the play is fairly panting to receive. He comes on like a house afire, while Pointer--flattered but flustered--keeps backing away, trying to hide behind her teapot.
TRAVEL
February 26, 2006
HAVING once visited the region, our family was overjoyed to discover the splendid article on Italy's Piedmont area, "Seeing Italy at a Snail's Pace" [Feb. 11] by David Downie. It was so much more than a blueprint of a region, conveying as it does, the very life and breath of these towns. Downie's article shows so much more than the usual travel writing does. PRISCILLA POINTER ROBERT SYMONDS Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
Retired music appreciation teacher Jacob Brackish may be passionate about his favorite classical works, but they also scare him silly. "I've heard it all before," he explains with the telling unease of an old man gazing into the twilight of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Billy Barty, dean of the screen's little people, is perfect casting in the title role of "Rumpelstiltskin" (citywide), the first in a projected series of feature-length musical fairy tales from Cannon Films. He's the most mischievous magical elf of them all, willing to spin straw into gold so that Katie (Amy Irving), the beautiful but humble miller's daughter, may win the hand of a handsome prince (John Moulder Brown, stuck with a wimpy mustache) and live happily ever after.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
From a strictly theatrical perspective, the most popular forms of American Christianity tend to be Catholicism for its sense of ritual, black Protestantism for its gospel music, and tiny rural congregations of any color--for the chance that someone might speak in tongues or handle live snakes. Big and predominantly white Protestant churches seldom inspire playwrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
You don't escape quaintness in the handsome revival of Paul Osborn's "Morning's at Seven" that opened over the weekend at South Coast Repertory. Just as it was commonplace on stage at the time the play was written (the late 1930s), and in life at the time in which it is set (1922), quaintness is built into the very fabric of this opening salvo of South Coast's 30th season in Orange County. That's right, 30 seasons. And counting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When Tennessee Williams' "The Night of the Iguana" was first produced on Broadway in December, 1961, it was voted Best American Play of the season, and a couple of critics even ventured that it was Williams' best play. Such proclamations are dangerously self-serving, but watching and, more to the point perhaps, listening to the revival of this play at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, where it opened Thursday, one is awed by the sheer beauty and nourishment in the writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Theatre Center has announced its first major programming plans since the city imposed rigorous new fund-raising requirements on the theater company last month. The fall-winter season, announced Tuesday, reflects the theater's new era only in that "there may be fewer directors or designers brought in from outside," said Artistic Director Bill Bushnell.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|