Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert T Bruce
IN THE NEWS

Robert T Bruce

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 8, 1991
Robert T. Bruce, the chief executive of Alpharel Inc. who helped bring the Camarillo company back from the brink of bankruptcy last year, stepped down from his post Monday to spend more time at his home in Aspen, Colo. Bruce, 56, said he will remain as chairman of Alpharel's board through next year and will stay with the company on a day-to-day basis through this year to help it complete several projects. Bruce was replaced as chief executive by Roger H.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 8, 1991
Robert T. Bruce, the chief executive of Alpharel Inc. who helped bring the Camarillo company back from the brink of bankruptcy last year, stepped down from his post Monday to spend more time at his home in Aspen, Colo. Bruce, 56, said he will remain as chairman of Alpharel's board through next year and will stay with the company on a day-to-day basis through this year to help it complete several projects. Bruce was replaced as chief executive by Roger H.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 25, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Alpharel Inc. almost crashed into bankruptcy. After the small Camarillo computer imaging company failed to win an extension of a contract with AT&T that once supplied 90% of its business, Alpharel had only $200,000 left in cash. Or enough to stay in business for two months. Four chief executives had come and gone over a 17-month period marred by a bitter proxy battle. Alpharel's stock, first offered to the public in 1987 at $11 a share, was trading for less than a dime.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Alpharel Inc. almost crashed into bankruptcy. After the small Camarillo computer imaging company failed to win an extension of a contract with AT&T that once supplied 90% of its business, Alpharel had only $200,000 left in cash. Or enough to stay in business for two months. Four chief executives had come and gone over a 17-month period marred by a bitter proxy battle. Alpharel's stock, first offered to the public in 1987 at $11 a share, was trading for less than a dime.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1993 | JACK SEARLES
Camarillo-based Alpharel Inc. expects to reduce overall costs $2 million annually as a result of its previously announced acquisition of San Diego's Optigraphics Corp. The savings will come from restructuring the two firms, both of which produce document imaging systems for business and government, said Robert T. Bruce, Alpharel's chairman and chief executive. The deal, completed last week, called for Alpharel to pay $10.7 million, consisting of $4.4 million in cash, 2.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alpharel Chief Executive Steps Down: Robert T. Bruce, the chief executive of Alpharel Inc. who helped bring the Camarillo company back from the brink of bankruptcy last year, stepped down from his post to spend more time at his home in Aspen, Colo. Bruce, 56, said he will remain as chairman of Alpharel's board through next year and will stay with the company on a day-to-day basis through this year to help it complete several projects. Bruce was replaced as chief executive by Roger H.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1993 | Jack Searles
A management shift is in the works at Alpharel Inc., a Camarillo producer of imaging systems that is about to acquire a San Diego competitor. Robert T. Bruce, Alpharel's chairman, will continue in that position but will also resume his former posts as president and chief executive officer. He'll take on the additional duties upon the merger with Optigraphics Corp.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1990 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1986, Alpharel Inc. in Camarillo rolled up annual sales of $14 million and a $1-million profit. Four years, big losses and several executive changes later, the company has become so weak that it can't afford to keep its chief financial officer and his $91,000 salary. Alpharel, a developer of computer data-storage systems, said it dismissed William H. Lane, who also was vice president of operations and secretary, on Friday.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sluggish economy took its toll among local businesses in the second quarter, with less than half of the publicly owned companies in a regional survey reporting higher earnings compared with a year earlier. In The Times survey of 62 local companies with headquarters from Ventura to Glendale, only 24 posted higher profits compared with a year earlier. An additional six rebounded from year-earlier losses and reported profits in the latest quarter.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|