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Robert T Jr Morris

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NEWS
November 23, 1988 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to data diddling, logic bombing, malicious hacking and other everyday forms of computer crime, there is no lack of laws on the books. Even that most sexy, state-of-the-art technological curse, the computer virus, may well be addressed--if not specifically cited--in state and federal criminal statutes, experts say. Successful prosecutions, however, are a different story, tending to decrease dramatically as the sophistication of the electronic misdeed increases.
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NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department said it will not appeal the sentence of a suspended Cornell University graduate student placed on probation for paralyzing a nationwide computer network. The department, which had sought a prison term for Robert T. Morris Jr., decided not to appeal the lighter sentence imposed May 4 by a federal judge in Syracuse, N.Y. The decision was made after a recommendation by Assistant Atty. Gen. Edward S. G. Dennis Jr., head of the criminal division, officials said.
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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
A jury Monday night found a graduate student guilty of federal computer tampering charges for unleashing a rogue program that crippled a nationwide computer network. Robert T. Morris, 24, faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. He is the first person brought to trial under a 1986 federal computer fraud and abuse law that makes it a felony to break into a federal computer network and hamper authorized use of the system. The jury returned its verdict at about 9:25 p.m.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A computer expert who created a "worm" program that paralyzed thousands of computers nationwide was placed on three years' probation Friday and fined $10,000 for the crime. U.S. District Judge Howard Munson also ordered 25-year-old Robert T. Morris to perform 400 hours of community service. Prosecutors had asked Munson for the maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Morris, a former Cornell University graduate student, did not speak at the sentencing.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
In 1845, only a year after Samuel F. B. Morse hooked up the first telegraph and tapped out his triumphant message--"What hath God wrought!"--another, more obscure figure clearly saw what Morse had wrought. Not even Rep. Francis O. J.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Last week's disruption of two interlinked government-operated computer networks by a computer virus could have been minimized or perhaps avoided if systems managers had simply implemented earlier instructions for fixing known defects in their systems, according to experts in government and academia. Graduate student Robert T. Morris Jr.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Staff Writers
FBI agents moved Tuesday to collect potential evidence in the computer virus investigation amid questions over prosecuting the prime suspect because of legal doubts that he intended to create the havoc that hit computer networks last week. Thomas Guidoboni, lawyer for Robert T. Morris Jr., the Cornell graduate student who is the central figure in the inquiry, said that FBI agents had not yet contacted him about questioning Morris.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department said it will not appeal the sentence of a suspended Cornell University graduate student placed on probation for paralyzing a nationwide computer network. The department, which had sought a prison term for Robert T. Morris Jr., decided not to appeal the lighter sentence imposed May 4 by a federal judge in Syracuse, N.Y. The decision was made after a recommendation by Assistant Atty. Gen. Edward S. G. Dennis Jr., head of the criminal division, officials said.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
The "worm" program that disabled thousands of computers nationwide was intended simply to enter computers, but an error caused it to go haywire, the graduate student who designed it testified Thursday. "My purpose was to see if I could write a program that would spread as widely as possible," Robert T. Morris told jurors in his federal computer tampering trial.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1988 | Associated Press
A virus that infected scores of computers across the United States earlier this month caused at least $97 million worth of damage, the director of the Computer Virus Industry Assn. said Thursday. "Our calculations of the damage it caused are very conservative. The real cost is probably well over $100 million," said John McAfee, computer virus consultant and director of a Santa Clara-based group of 11 companies that markets computer programs to fight viral programs.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
A jury Monday night found a graduate student guilty of federal computer tampering charges for unleashing a rogue program that crippled a nationwide computer network. Robert T. Morris, 24, faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. He is the first person brought to trial under a 1986 federal computer fraud and abuse law that makes it a felony to break into a federal computer network and hamper authorized use of the system. The jury returned its verdict at about 9:25 p.m.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
The "worm" program that disabled thousands of computers nationwide was intended simply to enter computers, but an error caused it to go haywire, the graduate student who designed it testified Thursday. "My purpose was to see if I could write a program that would spread as widely as possible," Robert T. Morris told jurors in his federal computer tampering trial.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From United Press International
A federal magistrate Friday refused to dismiss a felony charge against a former Cornell University computer whiz accused of planting a "worm" program that shut down about 6,000 computers nationwide. Defense attorney Thomas Guidoboni claimed federal prosecutors broke an agreement with defendant Robert Tappan Morris Jr., 24, of Arnold, Md.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Cornell University graduate student was indicted Wednesday on a felony charge in connection with a computer "virus" that paralyzed as many as 6,000 computers last fall. Robert Tappan Morris, 24, who has been suspended from the university for one year, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Syracuse, N. Y. He was charged with unauthorized use of at least four university and military computers.
NEWS
April 2, 1989
A rogue computer program that crippled a nationwide computer network last fall was neither the creation of a genius nor the act of a criminal, a commission at Cornell University has concluded. Cornell graduate student Robert Morris alone created the program that infected thousands of military and university computers, the panel's report said.
NEWS
February 2, 1989
A U.S. attorney's grant of limited immunity to a graduate student suspected of causing a nationwide computer virus has upset some Justice Department officials, a department source said. In addition, the office of U.S. Atty. Frederick J. Scullin in Syracuse, N.Y., has sought Justice Department approval to allow Robert T. Morris Jr. to plead guilty to a misdemeanor, the source said, confirming a report in the New York Times.
NEWS
February 2, 1989
A U.S. attorney's grant of limited immunity to a graduate student suspected of causing a nationwide computer virus has upset some Justice Department officials, a department source said. In addition, the office of U.S. Atty. Frederick J. Scullin in Syracuse, N.Y., has sought Justice Department approval to allow Robert T. Morris Jr. to plead guilty to a misdemeanor, the source said, confirming a report in the New York Times.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From United Press International
A federal magistrate Friday refused to dismiss a felony charge against a former Cornell University computer whiz accused of planting a "worm" program that shut down about 6,000 computers nationwide. Defense attorney Thomas Guidoboni claimed federal prosecutors broke an agreement with defendant Robert Tappan Morris Jr., 24, of Arnold, Md.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
In 1845, only a year after Samuel F. B. Morse hooked up the first telegraph and tapped out his triumphant message--"What hath God wrought!"--another, more obscure figure clearly saw what Morse had wrought. Not even Rep. Francis O. J.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to data diddling, logic bombing, malicious hacking and other everyday forms of computer crime, there is no lack of laws on the books. Even that most sexy, state-of-the-art technological curse, the computer virus, may well be addressed--if not specifically cited--in state and federal criminal statutes, experts say. Successful prosecutions, however, are a different story, tending to decrease dramatically as the sophistication of the electronic misdeed increases.
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