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NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A phone company worker upset over House passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement was arrested for allegedly threatening Rep. Robert T. Matsui, the FBI said. Paul Murray, 48, went to Matsui's Sacramento office Wednesday and made a verbal threat against Matsui to one of his employees, said FBI Agent Dick Ross. The employee called U.S. marshals, who overtook Murray half a block from the federal building. They questioned and arrested him without incident, Ross said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of mourners, including Democratic leaders of Congress and representatives from at least eight states, bid farewell Saturday to Rep. Robert T. Matsui, recalling the congressman as a noble man who continued to make the world a better place until the end of his life. In moving tributes to the Democrat who represented Sacramento for 26 years, friends and government officials described him as a man of "humble immigrant roots" who rose to the House of Representatives. Matsui, 63, died Jan.
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NEWS
May 3, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
DEAD OR ALIVE? "Dead," said Budget Director Leon E. Panetta, gloomily forecasting the fate of the North American Free Trade Agreement in Congress. But hold on. The very day the quote made headlines, Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) fired off some useful reading for his friend and former House colleague. In a statement, Matsui, who heads a congressional panel working with the Administration to pass the trade pact with Mexico and Canada, declared: "This fight is just beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2005 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento), a World War II internee who rose to become one of the top Asian Americans in Congress during 26 years of service, died late Saturday, his office announced Sunday. He was 63. One of his party's leading spokesmen on tax and Social Security issues, Matsui was hospitalized at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on Dec. 24, suffering from pneumonia.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Democratic Party took the unusual step of picking two members of Congress to head national fund-raising efforts for next year's elections. Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) and Sen. John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.) were chosen not only for their contacts with big givers, officials said, but for a special mission: bashing President Bush while promoting Democratic alternatives on the campaign trail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of mourners, including Democratic leaders of Congress and representatives from at least eight states, bid farewell Saturday to Rep. Robert T. Matsui, recalling the congressman as a noble man who continued to make the world a better place until the end of his life. In moving tributes to the Democrat who represented Sacramento for 26 years, friends and government officials described him as a man of "humble immigrant roots" who rose to the House of Representatives. Matsui, 63, died Jan.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Congressman Robert T. Matsui, a Democrat from Sacramento, made his long-spoken intentions formal Tuesday and announced that he will seek in 1992 the Senate seat now held by the retiring Alan Cranston. At a press conference in Sacramento and later in a telephone interview, Matsui vowed to press for increased funding to relieve homelessness, fill gaps in health care coverage and improve education.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Ways and Means Committee on Wednesday refused to prod the nation's utility companies into paying customers about $19 billion in refunds over the next few years. Consumers are owed an average of more than $200 each, but will have to wait up to 30 years for refunds from gas, electric and telephone companies. "This shows how powerful the utilities are in Congress," said Rep. Robert T.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
Ending months of indecision, Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) bowed out of the running Wednesday for California's 1988 Senate race. In announcing his decision, the five-term congressman cited his underdog position in the Democratic field of challengers and his increasing workload in the House. The move strengthens the hand of the presumed front-runner in the primary race, Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy. The primary victor can expect to face Republican incumbent Sen. Pete Wilson.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2003 | From Reuters
Democrats said Saturday that President Bush's plan to eliminate taxes on corporate dividends would do nothing to help families hurt by the sluggish economy, while adding to the nation's overall debt. In the weekly Democratic radio address, Rep. Robert T. Matsui of Sacramento said Bush's economic plan would not address the nation's anxiety created by job losses, falling stock prices, ravaged retirement accounts and the specter of war with Iraq.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2003 | From Reuters
Democrats said Saturday that President Bush's plan to eliminate taxes on corporate dividends would do nothing to help families hurt by the sluggish economy, while adding to the nation's overall debt. In the weekly Democratic radio address, Rep. Robert T. Matsui of Sacramento said Bush's economic plan would not address the nation's anxiety created by job losses, falling stock prices, ravaged retirement accounts and the specter of war with Iraq.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2002 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Incoming House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi on Monday named fellow California Rep. Robert T. Matsui to lead the party's uphill effort to regain control of the House of Representatives in 2004. By naming Matsui chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Pelosi turned to a veteran legislator considered fluent on the issues, well-connected in money circles and, perhaps most important, loyal to her personally.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL
It's hardly surprising that two of California's leading congressmen don't always see eye to eye. After all, Robert Matsui and David Dreier have a lot that separates them. Matsui is a serious, soft-spoken Japanese American from Northern California (Sacramento), who has risen to become an influential and respected member of the Democratic caucus during his 22 years in the House.
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK
Our nation's capital is a wondrous place of timeless ritual and immutable rhythms. The cherry blossoms unfurl each spring. The national Christmas tree beckons each winter. The president gets impeached every 130 years. And every few months, California's congressional delegation gets another bust in the chops from some critic positing the perpetual plaint: Can't they all just get along?
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Veteran California Rep. Robert Matsui and his wife, Doris, the top Asian American staffer in the White House, had every reason to believe that their labors on behalf of President Clinton's reelection provided a perfect match for their political interests as well as their heritage.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In another sign of fragmenting congressional opinion on welfare, Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) outlined his own reform bill Thursday, one that could become a rallying point for liberals. When it is formally introduced, Matsui's bill will join more than half a dozen other welfare reform plans put forward by legislators across the ideological spectrum. The proliferation of competing proposals testifies to the vacuum left by the Clinton Administration's failure to introduce its own plan.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), who is already facing a likely Democratic challenge in his 1992 bid for reelection, also will have a strong opponent next December when he stands for reelection as assistant majority leader in the Senate. Sen. Wendell H. Ford (D-Ky.) has announced that he will challenge Cranston for his Senate leadership position when the election is held at the end of this year.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2002 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Incoming House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi on Monday named fellow California Rep. Robert T. Matsui to lead the party's uphill effort to regain control of the House of Representatives in 2004. By naming Matsui chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Pelosi turned to a veteran legislator considered fluent on the issues, well-connected in money circles and, perhaps most important, loyal to her personally.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A phone company worker upset over House passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement was arrested for allegedly threatening Rep. Robert T. Matsui, the FBI said. Paul Murray, 48, went to Matsui's Sacramento office Wednesday and made a verbal threat against Matsui to one of his employees, said FBI Agent Dick Ross. The employee called U.S. marshals, who overtook Murray half a block from the federal building. They questioned and arrested him without incident, Ross said.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER
The cover photograph in a recent issue of Roll Call, the wonkish but well-read Capitol Hill newspaper, showed Rep. Robert T. Matsui and three House members milling about at a pro-NAFTA news conference. The headline read: "Well, We've Got Four Votes," a wry reminder of the grim arithmetic facing the trade treaty's backers. Somewhere among the House's 435 members, a majority of 218 must be cajoled into supporting the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement.
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