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Robert Tannen

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February 15, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Santa Monica Museum of Art is not large, but it does have the capacity to surprise. It has a way of not bogging down in its own exhibitions schedule, bouncing merrily from the latest in vanguard installations to Lost Generation photographs by Lee Miller. SMMA's building was, of course, designed by Frank Gehry, Los Angeles' main claim to pride of place among the Olympians of contemporary architecture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Nobody has to tell us not to touch the art when we walk into a museum or gallery. Those instructions are built into the art itself and into the way it is presented, and an aura of restricted access is one of the distinguishing characteristics of high art. New Orleans artist Robert Tannen has always hated that. "If you're feeling, 'No, you can't mess with my blocks,' there's a good chance what you're doing is self-indulgent," Tannen declares about the art-making process.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Nobody has to tell us not to touch the art when we walk into a museum or gallery. Those instructions are built into the art itself and into the way it is presented, and an aura of restricted access is one of the distinguishing characteristics of high art. New Orleans artist Robert Tannen has always hated that. "If you're feeling, 'No, you can't mess with my blocks,' there's a good chance what you're doing is self-indulgent," Tannen declares about the art-making process.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Santa Monica Museum of Art is not large, but it does have the capacity to surprise. It has a way of not bogging down in its own exhibitions schedule, bouncing merrily from the latest in vanguard installations to Lost Generation photographs by Lee Miller. SMMA's building was, of course, designed by Frank Gehry, Los Angeles' main claim to pride of place among the Olympians of contemporary architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1993
I admire Robert Tannen's efforts in the planning and preservation of the country's river systems. I have little doubt that he is a competent urban planner. But I do object to his (ironically) self-important tone in his critique of traditional object making ("Citizen Tannen," by Kristine McKenna, Feb. 21). Tannen dismisses the international creative community as "self-indulgent and self-promotional" and insists that "object making and the idea of permanence central to the art object have no meaning for me."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a scene few U.S. cities could match. On a hot night thousands of art lovers, wearing stick-on messages declaring "Art Is Fun," blocked traffic in the narrow streets of New Orleans' Warehouse District. The occasion was the renovation of the city's Contemporary Arts Center. After two years and $5 million, the center opened its doors last month in a redesigned industrial building in the heart of New Orleans' Gallery Row.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | From Associated Press
How would some of the best known U.S. cities look if seas rose by slightly more than three feet? It's a disturbing picture. The projections are based on coastal maps created by scientists at the University of Arizona, who relied on data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Many scientists say sea rise of one meter will probably happen within 100 years. Here is a look at what that might do: Boston Fourth of July celebrations wouldn't be the same.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2002 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
In a dim exhibit room beside the town library, the strange babies of George Ohr are ready for when the world finally embraces their misfit creator. It will not be long. Nearly a century after the artistic establishment snubbed Ohr and his unusual pottery, leaving thousands of pieces to languish for decades in a dusty car-repair shop in this Gulf Coast community, the long-ignored artist is at last receiving the adulation so frostily denied during his restless life.
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