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Robert Tappan

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WORLD
May 27, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
For centuries, disciples of the spirit have come to this desert shrine town in search of guidance, power or solace. Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani studied at the seminaries here as a young man before heading off to Iraq and eventually becoming Shiite Islam's most widely regarded scholar. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who lived here before his exile, returned to settle among the bearded and turbaned clerics after leading the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
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WORLD
May 27, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
For centuries, disciples of the spirit have come to this desert shrine town in search of guidance, power or solace. Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani studied at the seminaries here as a young man before heading off to Iraq and eventually becoming Shiite Islam's most widely regarded scholar. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who lived here before his exile, returned to settle among the bearded and turbaned clerics after leading the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times wire services
Cornell University has suspended a graduate student who created a computer "virus" that jammed a nationwide computer network last year, it was reported today. Robert Tappan Morris, 23, was informed in a May 16 letter by the dean of the Cornell University Graduate School that the university's Academic Integrity Hearing Board recommended that he be suspended until the fall semester of 1990, the New York Times said. The virus entered about 6,000 computers at universities, corporations and military installations last November and replicated itself until systems nationwide were jammed.
NEWS
May 26, 1989
Cornell University has suspended the graduate student accused of writing a software virus that last year infected thousands of computers hooked up to a national network, his lawyer said. Thomas Guidoboni, the lawyer for Robert Tappan Morris, confirmed a New York Times report that a letter telling Morris he had violated the school's code of academic integrity had been sent to his client, but he would not comment further. The virus entered the national computer network Internet in November, "infecting" as many as 6,000 computers at universities, corporations and military installations.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From United Press International
A federal magistrate Friday refused to dismiss a felony charge against a former Cornell University computer whiz accused of planting a "worm" program that shut down about 6,000 computers nationwide. Defense attorney Thomas Guidoboni claimed federal prosecutors broke an agreement with defendant Robert Tappan Morris Jr., 24, of Arnold, Md.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Cornell University graduate student was indicted Wednesday on a felony charge in connection with a computer "virus" that paralyzed as many as 6,000 computers last fall. Robert Tappan Morris, 24, who has been suspended from the university for one year, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Syracuse, N. Y. He was charged with unauthorized use of at least four university and military computers.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Cornell University graduate student blamed for a rogue computer program that infected as many as 6,000 computers with an electronic virus was indicted today on a felony computer-crime charge. Robert Tappan Morris was indicted by a federal grand jury in Syracuse, N.Y., on one count of accessing without authorization at least six computers in which the federal government has an interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Chris Megerian and Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - California officials are imposing a record $16 million in penalties on secretive political groups that funneled money into initiative campaigns in 2012, ending a yearlong investigation that showed gaps in state disclosure laws. Two campaign committees in California are being ordered to pay a total of $15 million to the state, a sum equivalent to the donations they received, which regulators said were improperly reported. Two Arizona nonprofits, one linked to billionaire Republican donors Charles and David Koch, will pay a combined $1-million fine as part of a settlement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1990
Marshal Alan Phillips' column ("Resistance to Gay Cops Defeats the Police Mission," Commentary, Sept. 1) only addresses this issue from one perspective. Social change can be legislated, but enacting such legislation does not automatically mean widespread and immediate acceptance among the populace or smaller groups. It is unreasonable to expect any body of people to instantly change feelings and attitudes developed over a lifetime.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
A jury Monday night found a graduate student guilty of federal computer tampering charges for unleashing a rogue program that crippled a nationwide computer network. Robert T. Morris, 24, faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. He is the first person brought to trial under a 1986 federal computer fraud and abuse law that makes it a felony to break into a federal computer network and hamper authorized use of the system. The jury returned its verdict at about 9:25 p.m.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The FBI disclosed Wednesday that it was seizing magnetic tapes, mathematical notations and all computer accounts of Robert T. Morris Jr., the graduate student at Cornell University who is suspected of unleashing the "virus" that spread havoc in computer systems across the nation earlier this month. The records were described in federal search warrants filed in upper New York state, the first court documents to surface in the case.
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