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Robert Teeter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1988 | CHRISTOPHER MATTHEWS
Once again a major political party has fallen into the hands of its pollster. On paper, Robert Teeter works for Republican presidential nominee George Bush. In fact, it is the other way around. The pollster, not the candidate, was the man calling the shots last week. He used his numbers and his influence to effect the selection of Sen. Dan Quayle as the GOP running mate. He used the same alchemy to formulate Bush's acceptance speech and the party's overall campaign message. Teeter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Robert Teeter, veteran Republican pollster and campaign strategist credited with proposing Dan Quayle as President George H.W. Bush's running mate and later blamed for losing the 1992 Bush-Quayle bid for a second term, has died. He was 65. Teeter, Bush's senior polling advisor in 1988 and campaign chairman in 1992, died Sunday night of cancer at his home in Ann Arbor, Mich.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Robert Teeter, veteran Republican pollster and campaign strategist credited with proposing Dan Quayle as President George H.W. Bush's running mate and later blamed for losing the 1992 Bush-Quayle bid for a second term, has died. He was 65. Teeter, Bush's senior polling advisor in 1988 and campaign chairman in 1992, died Sunday night of cancer at his home in Ann Arbor, Mich.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush said Thursday that he will "take the lead on the budget deficit question," offering his most definitive statement since the election that once in office he will present his own budget-balancing proposals. He also expressed a willingness to negotiate with the Democratic majority in Congress. Bush's statement on the budget, made after a breakfast with Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush said Thursday that he will "take the lead on the budget deficit question," offering his most definitive statement since the election that once in office he will present his own budget-balancing proposals. He also expressed a willingness to negotiate with the Democratic majority in Congress. Bush's statement on the budget, made after a breakfast with Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One in Five Homeowners Refinanced Recently: Nearly 20% of American homeowners have refinanced their mortgages in the last 18 months and another 14% are considering the move, a survey says. The Federal National Mortgage Assn. said its survey shows that 31% of Americans refinanced their mortgages at some time and that 19% did so in the refinancing waves of 1992 and 1993. The survey of more than 2,000 people was conducted by the research firms of Peter D. Hart and Robert Teeter.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | Associated Press
George Bush gave and received advice on federal budget constraints and education Monday in a meeting with 10 university presidents, who generally praised the man who has vowed to be "the education President." "He reaffirmed that commitment to us today in no uncertain terms," said Benno Schmidt Jr., president of Yale University, Bush's alma mater. "We recognize that we have a friend of education in the White House.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Vice President George Bush said today he did not authorize statements by campaign aides calling Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III a campaign liability and said their views did not reflect his own. While campaigning here, Bush was asked about a published report quoting campaign aides Peter Teeley and Robert Teeter as suggesting Meese should resign. The vice president said he was unaware of the comments of his two top aides. "I haven't authorized anything.
NEWS
December 4, 1985 | Associated Press
Vice President George Bush's potential rivals for the 1988 Republican presidential nomination were crying "foul" today over a poll commissioned by the Republican National Committee that included questions about Bush's potential as a candidate. "Someone ought to be fired," said former Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. of Tennessee. "I didn't know the RNC had become a Bush headquarters," said Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas, the current Senate majority leader.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | From Times' staff writers
WAITING GAME: Although President Bush's two-day California visit late last week heartened some of his partisans, concerns about drift and disarray within his reelection campaign deepen among Republican insiders. And the protracted wait for Secretary of State James A. Baker III--who is expected to assume command of the reelection team soon--has only intensified those worries. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1988 | CHRISTOPHER MATTHEWS
Once again a major political party has fallen into the hands of its pollster. On paper, Robert Teeter works for Republican presidential nominee George Bush. In fact, it is the other way around. The pollster, not the candidate, was the man calling the shots last week. He used his numbers and his influence to effect the selection of Sen. Dan Quayle as the GOP running mate. He used the same alchemy to formulate Bush's acceptance speech and the party's overall campaign message. Teeter.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dan Quayle for six months waged a quiet campaign to get George Bush to choose him as a running mate in 1988, the Washington Post quoted the vice president as saying. Quayle told the newspaper: "You don't run for vice president, but . . . there are ways you can be put on the 'available' chart. . . . You keep expectations down and do things as quietly and subtly as possible."
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