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Robert Towne

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May 8, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
"Chinatown" writer Robert Towne has listed his estate on the Westside at $12.995 million. Built in 1926 and designed for grand entertaining, the restored English country-style mansion and guesthouse have seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms and 10,000 square feet of living space. The nearly three-quarter-acre property is wooded and includes a swimming pool, a rose garden and a spice garden. Towne, 77, won an Oscar for original screenplay in 1975 for the Jack Nicholson-starring film about land and water rights disputes.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
"Chinatown" writer Robert Towne has listed his estate on the Westside at $12.995 million. Built in 1926 and designed for grand entertaining, the restored English country-style mansion and guesthouse have seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms and 10,000 square feet of living space. The nearly three-quarter-acre property is wooded and includes a swimming pool, a rose garden and a spice garden. Towne, 77, won an Oscar for original screenplay in 1975 for the Jack Nicholson-starring film about land and water rights disputes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002
Robert Towne, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of "Chinatown," will chair the selection committee for the USC Scripter Award, which honors the year's best English-language film adaptation of a book or novella. Bestowed annually since 1989 by the USC Friends of the Libraries, the award is billed as the only honor that recognizes both the author and screenwriter for a film adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010
Only in Hollywood could a screenwriter mine the rather unsexy topics of water and land rights in Southern California during the early 20th century and come up with one of the most beguiling, beautiful and arresting films of all time. Robert Towne, who wrote the screenplay for "Chinatown," screens the 1974 classic, which won the Academy Award for original screenplay. After the film, Towne will be joined by California historian Kevin Starr, and Mark J. Harris and Ted Braun, USC cinematic arts professors, to discuss the film's resonance with our sense of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1999 | PAUL IORIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood may be obsessed with youth, but some films improve with age. On the 25th anniversary of "Chinatown," the film's creators have revisited the movie and are somewhat surprised to find that it holds up better than they ever could have imagined. One evening not long ago, "Chinatown" director Roman Polanski happened upon the movie while channel-surfing with his wife, actress Emmanuelle Seigner, at their Paris home.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1990 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Whoosh!! "Days of Thunder" just streaked in (citywide), fast as a race-car paint job and about as flat. The movie's excitement comes from its racing footage; its massive case of attitude comes from producers Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer's assurance that they can retool the formula of "Top Gun," bless it with a little sprinkle of Valvoline and send it out as a brand-new movie. They have a few things working for them. Tom Cruise's slowly dawning grin remains unassailable.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986
These are the cats that walked by themselves. Woody Allen Robert Altman Michael Caine John Cassavetes Francis Ford Coppola Lillian Gish Katharine Hepburn John Huston Akira Kurosawa Burt Lancaster Jack Nicholson Martin Scorsese RUNNERS UP Robert Duvall Elaine May Harry Dean Stanton Meryl Streep Robert Towne
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Screenwriter Robert Towne has struck a deal to develop a remake of the Alfred Hitchcock classic "The 39 Steps." The Hollywood veteran, who won an Oscar for 1974's "Chinatown" and was nominated for "The Last Detail," "Shampoo" and "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes," will write and direct the thriller for Carlton International Media, Daily Variety reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske
A hot screen debut in "Bad Boys." Oscar-talk for "La Bamba." So whatever happened to Esai Morales? Well, we would have seen him in Robert Towne's "Tequila Sunrise"--but his scenes were axed. "That's moviemaking," said a philosophical Morales. He told us it was a small role, a couple days' work playing the drug-dealing son of drug dealer Raul Julia (Gibson portrays a cocaine dealer trying to go straight). "I did it to work with Mel and Robert Towne--two people I really admire."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
LOVERS of Los Angeles literature and especially the works of John Fante have long anticipated the arrival of the movie version of "Ask the Dust." That it was entrusted to Robert Towne, of "Chinatown" fame and keeper of a tradition of Southern California writers, has been a source of comfort and high hopes. Thirty years of gestation have produced a film of great beauty with unfulfilled promise -- a disappointment, but with much to recommend and be glad about.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is the author of "State of the Arts: California Artists Talk About Their Work."
Few screenwriters traverse California history with the surety of Robert Towne. Raised in San Pedro, he seems as wedded to the land as are the people he writes about. His Pacific Palisades home is surrounded by lush lawns, pepper trees and birds of paradise, and you can hear the backyard fountain from inside the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
Screenwriter Robert Towne has struck a deal to develop a remake of the Alfred Hitchcock classic "The 39 Steps." The Hollywood veteran, who won an Oscar for 1974's "Chinatown" and was nominated for "The Last Detail," "Shampoo" and "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes," will write and direct the thriller for Carlton International Media, Daily Variety reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002
Robert Towne, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of "Chinatown," will chair the selection committee for the USC Scripter Award, which honors the year's best English-language film adaptation of a book or novella. Bestowed annually since 1989 by the USC Friends of the Libraries, the award is billed as the only honor that recognizes both the author and screenwriter for a film adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | Robert Towne, Special to The Times
What sets a great screenwriter on his path? Picking up a lifetime achievement award from the writer's organization PEN West last month, Robert Towne ("Chinatown," "Shampoo," "Mission: Impossible") thought back to his beginnings. Here is an excerpt from his remarks. I grew up in a time when Los Angeles and screenwriting were viewed along similar lines -- the best thing about L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2000
Once again, Robert Towne earns his reputation as being one of the superlative screenwriters in the industry (" 'M:I-2' Author to Critic: Forget It, Steve, It Isn't 'Notorious'," June 5). He writes, regarding "M:I-2": "Carefully orchestrated action sequences that make up at least half the movie . . . [do] not really allow for many 'layers of complexity and perversity' for the characters." What this renowned master of the art of subtext has thus said: "They already had the action sequences written in, and all I was asked to do was fill in the gaps with enough plot and people to carry them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
As writer-director Robert Towne told it to Rolling Stone, his film "Tequila Sunrise" almost starred Harrison Ford and Lakers Coach Pat Riley. Ford talked to Towne about the role of Dale McKussic, eventually played by Mel Gibson, but Ford backed out after apparently having second thoughts about playing a drug dealer, according to Towne. He was later interested in casting the natty, slicked-back Riley as Frescia, the detective role that went to Kurt Russell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | PAUL IORIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood may be obsessed with youth, but some films improve with age. On the 25th anniversary of "Chinatown," the film's creators have revisited the movie and are somewhat surprised to find that it holds up better than they ever could have imagined. One evening not long ago, "Chinatown" director Roman Polanski happened upon the movie while channel-surfing with his wife, actress Emmanuelle Seigner, at their Paris home.
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