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Robert Townsend

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Townsend, the triple-threat creative force behind "Hollywood Shuffle"--the 1987 groundbreaking satire of the movie business--is caught in a Sunday evening TV shuffle. Townsend's latest directorial projects, Showtime's "Holiday Heart" and NBC's "Livin' for Love: The Natalie Cole Story," will square off against each other. "Holiday Heart" will premiere on the pay-cable station at 8 p.m., while NBC will broadcast the musical biography at 9 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Townsend, the triple-threat creative force behind "Hollywood Shuffle"--the 1987 groundbreaking satire of the movie business--is caught in a Sunday evening TV shuffle. Townsend's latest directorial projects, Showtime's "Holiday Heart" and NBC's "Livin' for Love: The Natalie Cole Story," will square off against each other. "Holiday Heart" will premiere on the pay-cable station at 8 p.m., while NBC will broadcast the musical biography at 9 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not all that far away from New Jack City lives Meteor Man. He's N the 'hood, but he's definitely not one of the Boyz. He's no Menace II Society, and he's not into posses or "juice." Unlike Superfly, he can really fly. His brand of justice may not be poetic, but it's swift. Meteor Man, as presented in the movie of the same name opening Friday by writer-director Robert Townsend, is actually inner-city schoolteacher Jefferson Reed.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
Robert C. Townsend, 77, former Avis president and author of the bestseller "Up the Organization." As head of Avis Rent-a-Car from 1962 until ITT Corp. acquired it in 1965, Townsend took the company from one that lost $3 million a year to one that made $2.8 million in profit. He launched the firm's "We Try Harder" advertising campaign challenging front-running competitor Hertz, and that slogan remains in use today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right in front of their eyes, without props or wardrobe, actor-filmmaker Robert Townsend transformed himself into pieces of his past. As an audience of young men at Camp Holton probation camp looked on intently, Townsend slipped easily into real-life characters: the neighborhood drug dealer, his grandmother, his "homeboy" from Chicago, who shot down his dreams of making it in Hollywood. "You on welfare like everybody else," Townsend said mimicking his street-smart friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS
Actor, comedian and filmmaker Robert Townsend grew up on the west side of Chicago in the 1960s listening to R&B groups like the Temptations, the O'Jays and the Spinners. After the surprising success of his first movie, "Hollywood Shuffle," Townsend decided he wanted to make a movie about the rise of a '60s soul group--a comedy, of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1988 | Patrick Goldstein
Ever since director John Hughes struck gold by using such pop songs as "Pretty in Pink" and "Some Kind of Wonderful" as titles for his teen pics, Hollywood has been cruising the Hot 100 searching for movie monikers. The latest? A&M Films' once-titled "Finding Maubee," a comedy drama about a Carribean cop (Denzel Washington) whose boyhood pal (Robert Townsend) is a murder suspect. The film, due from MGM, is now called . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
And the beat goes on: Writer-director-actor Robert Townsend--who lampooned the film industry's treatment of blacks in "Hollywood Shuffle"--will next explore the early '60s music biz with "The Five Heartbeats." It's about the rise and fall of a fictional black singing group in an era when white singers often "covered" (re-recorded) tunes first done by blacks to get broader airplay on white-owned stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Eddie Murphy, whose popular street-wise persona was satirized by Robert Townsend in his film "Hollywood Shuffle," will join Townsend as a special guest on Fox Broadcasting's "The Late Show" tonight. While on Murphy's boat (the two are pals), Townsend--who is the current guest host in the procession that followed Joan Rivers' dismissal--invited him on the show at the suggestion of "The Late Show's" producer, John Scura. The all-female group Klymaxx will also appear.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | David Pecchia
Robert Townsend can put away his credit cards--Warner Bros. has extended his credit. "Hollywood Shuffle," writer-director-star-fund-raiser Townsend's $100,000 spoof of Tinseltown's treatment of black actors and film makers largely financed with his plastic cash, has earned him and "Shuffle" co-writer Keenen Ivory Wayans a multi-pic deal with the studio. First in line from the new partnership will be "Heartbeat."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997
After work: When we're done taping my WB show, "Parent 'Hood," on Fridays, I go to Georgia on Melrose for gourmet soul food. I like the catfish with black-eyed peas, macaroni and cheese, greens and peach cobbler a la mode. Breakfast time: We like to go to Coco's in the Valley. My daughters (ages 3, 5 and 6) love the pancakes shaped like Mickey Mouse with a whipped cream smile. Saturday afternoon: We go to a movie at the Century City AMC 14.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Judy Brennan
Have burger ads become actor-director Robert Townsend's own version of the "Hollywood Shuffle"? Granted, Townsend's movies--like "Hollywood Shuffle," "The Five Heartbeats" and "Meteor Man"--have generally not had much of an impact on the box office. But Townsend's latest effort-- playing a director in a current McDonald's Big Mac TV spot--only seems like a slightly cruel reminder of what Townsend's potential once was.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right in front of their eyes, without props or wardrobe, actor-filmmaker Robert Townsend transformed himself into pieces of his past. As an audience of young men at Camp Holton probation camp looked on intently, Townsend slipped easily into real-life characters: the neighborhood drug dealer, his grandmother, his "homeboy" from Chicago, who shot down his dreams of making it in Hollywood. "You on welfare like everybody else," Townsend said mimicking his street-smart friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
The less-than-rhapsodic fall season continues to unfold Sunday with a loud confrontation that will help determine which network takes second place in the ratings that night behind "60-Minutes"-led CBS. Clashing like cymbals will be the premieres of ABC's "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman" and NBC's "seaQuest DSV," expensive, high-profile series that face each other (and "Murder, She Wrote" on CBS) at 8 p.m. And preceding them at 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The winners of the 32nd annual Samuel Goldwyn Writing Awards have been announced. The three prize winners--all UCLA students submitting screenplays (plays and teleplays were also admissible)--were Randall McCormick (first place of $5,000 for his "Old Dogs and New Tricks"), Robert Wolfe (second place, $2,500, for his undergraduate work "Paper Dragons") and Lawrence Riggins (third place, $1,000, for "The Reckoning of J. D. Turner").
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Canceled in a Heartbeat: Filmmaker and comedian Robert Townsend canceled his performance with the vocal group the Dells on Sunday because officials of Anaheim's Celebrity Theatre allegedly did not pay him in the manner specified in his contract, Townsend's publicist said Monday. "My understanding is that on the night of the show, the theater was supposed to have a cashier's check, or cash," publicist Tony Wafford said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not all that far away from New Jack City lives Meteor Man. He's N the 'hood, but he's definitely not one of the Boyz. He's no Menace II Society, and he's not into posses or "juice." Unlike Superfly, he can really fly. His brand of justice may not be poetic, but it's swift. Meteor Man, as presented in the movie of the same name opening Friday by writer-director Robert Townsend, is actually inner-city schoolteacher Jefferson Reed.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Scene: Around the pool at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel Thursday night, where the cast of "Sarafina!" mingled with guests after the show's opening at the James A. Doolittle Theatre on Vine Street. The sky was threatening, but sprinkles held off until guests collected their cars and were on their way home. The South African musical, a major hit in New York, is installed at the Doolittle until the end of September.
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