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May 27, 2002
Radio journalist Linda Wertheimer, left, pays tribute today to one of the medium's pioneers in "Further Details With Robert Trout," airing at 2 p.m. on KCRW-FM (89.9). Trout began reporting in 1931 and contributed to NPR until his death in 2000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2002
Radio journalist Linda Wertheimer, left, pays tribute today to one of the medium's pioneers in "Further Details With Robert Trout," airing at 2 p.m. on KCRW-FM (89.9). Trout began reporting in 1931 and contributed to NPR until his death in 2000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | From The Associated Press
Legendary broadcaster Robert Trout, who as one of "Murrow's boys" at CBS radio in the 1930s and '40s helped create the role of anchorman, died Tuesday at 91. Trout, who died of congestive heart failure at Lenox Hill Hospital, was known for his crisp baritone, his stamina and his agility at ad-libbing. Among the events he covered during his seven-decade career were John Philip Sousa's last public performance, campaign and presidential speeches by Franklin D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | From The Associated Press
Legendary broadcaster Robert Trout, who as one of "Murrow's boys" at CBS radio in the 1930s and '40s helped create the role of anchorman, died Tuesday at 91. Trout, who died of congestive heart failure at Lenox Hill Hospital, was known for his crisp baritone, his stamina and his agility at ad-libbing. Among the events he covered during his seven-decade career were John Philip Sousa's last public performance, campaign and presidential speeches by Franklin D.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT
The year was 1936, the convention Republican, the nominee Alf Landon. It might have been the first time politicians thought of scheduling their conclaves for broadcast in prime time, said Robert Trout. He was there for CBS radio. Earlier this week, at age 78, he was in New Orleans for ABC Radio News, covering his 28th convention, the GOP gathering that nominated George Bush for President. Prime-time conventioneering, tailored for television, has become routine.
SPORTS
December 16, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Time was when many Americans could stroll to the edge of town with a cane pole on one shoulder, throw a line with a worm on the hook into a fishing hole and pull out a trout for supper. It might never be quite like that again, but the California Department of Fish and Game will bring neighborhood fishing to parts of Los Angeles and Orange counties next year as part of its urban lakes program.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS
The California Department of Fish and Game announced that it plans to plant 1.556 million catchable-size, hatchery-grown rainbow trout throughout Southern California this year. It might be a lot fewer than that--by almost 1.556 million. Trout Unlimited's so-called "friendly" lawsuit against the DFG's hatchery program filed last year became less friendly when attorney Barrett McInerney, frustrated by a lack of response, served DFG with a complaint last week.
SPORTS
August 12, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Short on money and personnel, the California Department of Fish and Game has trouble keeping up with the needs of fishermen, hunters and non-game issues, so it welcomes help from private organizations such as California Trout. The DFG operates on about $140 million a year. Last year, CalTrout, founded in 1971, spent $350,000, most of which was raised from memberships, donations and fund-raisers.
SPORTS
February 10, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS
Terry West needed a map to find his way to Alondra Park in Lawndale on Tuesday, and when he got there, he said, "People were probably wondering what this one-ton truck was doing on their launch ramp." West had come from the California Department of Fish and Game hatchery in Fillmore, where he is assistant manager, to deliver the first load of trout in the state's expanded urban lakes planting program. "A few kids were there fishing," West said.
SPORTS
May 25, 1988 | Rich Roberts
Eastern Sierra weather has improved, and with it the features of the region. "I've got a T-shirt, shorts and a pair of sandals on," Fred Rowe said Tuesday by phone from Sierra Bright Dot Guide Service at Mammoth Lakes. "I'm watching the girls go by in their bikinis." With cold storms from the north having passed through, the trout fishing has been better, too. Hot Creek already had the best fly fishing and has picked up some more with mayfly and caddis hatches.
SPORTS
February 10, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS
Terry West needed a map to find his way to Alondra Park in Lawndale on Tuesday, and when he got there, he said, "People were probably wondering what this one-ton truck was doing on their launch ramp." West had come from the California Department of Fish and Game hatchery in Fillmore, where he is assistant manager, to deliver the first load of trout in the state's expanded urban lakes planting program. "A few kids were there fishing," West said.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS
The California Department of Fish and Game announced that it plans to plant 1.556 million catchable-size, hatchery-grown rainbow trout throughout Southern California this year. It might be a lot fewer than that--by almost 1.556 million. Trout Unlimited's so-called "friendly" lawsuit against the DFG's hatchery program filed last year became less friendly when attorney Barrett McInerney, frustrated by a lack of response, served DFG with a complaint last week.
SPORTS
December 16, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Time was when many Americans could stroll to the edge of town with a cane pole on one shoulder, throw a line with a worm on the hook into a fishing hole and pull out a trout for supper. It might never be quite like that again, but the California Department of Fish and Game will bring neighborhood fishing to parts of Los Angeles and Orange counties next year as part of its urban lakes program.
SPORTS
August 12, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
Short on money and personnel, the California Department of Fish and Game has trouble keeping up with the needs of fishermen, hunters and non-game issues, so it welcomes help from private organizations such as California Trout. The DFG operates on about $140 million a year. Last year, CalTrout, founded in 1971, spent $350,000, most of which was raised from memberships, donations and fund-raisers.
SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | Rich Roberts
Trout Unlimited and California Trout would seem to be similar organizations with a common purpose--to preserve and develop trout fishing resources--so it may surprise some people that they haven't worked together for about the last 20 years. That's the way CalTrout wants it, but TU, a national organization, has been a persistent suitor. TU President Steve Lundy of Denver was in Southern California recently to help launch the South Coast Chapter in Orange County and said, "A national organization would come in handy (for CalTrout)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT
The year was 1936, the convention Republican, the nominee Alf Landon. It might have been the first time politicians thought of scheduling their conclaves for broadcast in prime time, said Robert Trout. He was there for CBS radio. Earlier this week, at age 78, he was in New Orleans for ABC Radio News, covering his 28th convention, the GOP gathering that nominated George Bush for President. Prime-time conventioneering, tailored for television, has become routine.
SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | Rich Roberts
Trout Unlimited and California Trout would seem to be similar organizations with a common purpose--to preserve and develop trout fishing resources--so it may surprise some people that they haven't worked together for about the last 20 years. That's the way CalTrout wants it, but TU, a national organization, has been a persistent suitor. TU President Steve Lundy of Denver was in Southern California recently to help launch the South Coast Chapter in Orange County and said, "A national organization would come in handy (for CalTrout)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999
Martin Agronsky was one of a gritty band of broadcast news pioneers who brought the reality of world war into the living rooms of Americans by radio from 1939 to 1945. Their names ring in legend: Edward R. Murrow, Eric Sevareid, Charles Collingwood, Robert Trout and William L. Shirer, among others. Typical of his colleagues, Agronsky was a newspaperman before turning to radio and serving with NBC in Europe in 1940 and later with CBS, ABC and PBS. He died last weekend at 84.
SPORTS
May 25, 1988 | Rich Roberts
Eastern Sierra weather has improved, and with it the features of the region. "I've got a T-shirt, shorts and a pair of sandals on," Fred Rowe said Tuesday by phone from Sierra Bright Dot Guide Service at Mammoth Lakes. "I'm watching the girls go by in their bikinis." With cold storms from the north having passed through, the trout fishing has been better, too. Hot Creek already had the best fly fishing and has picked up some more with mayfly and caddis hatches.
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