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Robert Vaughn

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NEWS
October 31, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Man From U.N.C.L.E. raises a little "Caine" this week on Kung Fu: The Legend Continues. Yes, grasshoppers, Robert Vaughn, the sexy superspy Napoleon Solo of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." fame, guests on the syndicated David Carradine series in an episode titled "Dragonswing." But Vaughn's not the only '60s icon dropping by. Patrick MacNee, who played sophisticated British spy John Steed on "The Avengers," also is featured.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2012 | By Robert Abele
"Excuse Me for Living" is a problems-of-the-rich comedy that only an old, out-of-touch billionaire could love. Writer/director Ric Klass' story about a drug-addicted, jerkish twentysomething (Tom Pelphrey) who falls for the sexually promiscuous daughter (Melissa Archer) of his court-appointed doctor (Robert Vaughn) depicts today's youth as reckless and ungrateful, the older generation as wise and worth heeding. Pelphrey's suicidal med school dropout is forced by Vaughn's Dr. Bernstein to attend a seniors group therapy meeting (which includes a role for Jerry Stiller)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993 | DIANE WERTS, NEWSDAY
He's just making a quick stop in New York City--two days-- because he's sailing next week for a month's tour of Europe, then heading up to Nantucket. At least he's here long enough to lunch at the Russian Tea Room, where he nods hello to fellow note-worthies as he regales his booth companions with tales of past and present adventures. His intercontinental travels from Yugoslavia to Peru. His activism in the '60s when he led anti-war efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
IN the 1960s, they were the sauve and debonair private eyes and spies who drew millions to TVs for weekly tongue-in-cheek adventures. Now, Robert Vaughn ("The Man From U.N.C.L.E.") and Robert Wagner ("It Takes a Thief") have reunited for a single episode of AMC's "Hustle," a slick "Ocean's Eleven"-type con series, in which the still-charming actors, both in their 70s, will match wits and tailors to charm a new generation of viewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Robert Vaughn has three "rules of engagement" when it comes to picking a project: "I need to know where it's going to be shot," he says. "I have to know how much money I am going to be paid. And then I ask to read the script after that." If the acting assignment is in London or Paris, Vaughn, 73, doesn't even care about the script. So it was just icing on the cake that he loved the first two screenplays he was sent by the BBC producers for the lighthearted series "Hustle," which makes its U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
IN the 1960s, they were the sauve and debonair private eyes and spies who drew millions to TVs for weekly tongue-in-cheek adventures. Now, Robert Vaughn ("The Man From U.N.C.L.E.") and Robert Wagner ("It Takes a Thief") have reunited for a single episode of AMC's "Hustle," a slick "Ocean's Eleven"-type con series, in which the still-charming actors, both in their 70s, will match wits and tailors to charm a new generation of viewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
- Hard-core rock 'n' roll fans tired of discotheques or Top 40 nightclubs now have an alternative to spending Saturday nights at home, listening to old Jimi Hendrix or Johnny Winter albums and wistfully reminiscing about how people used to pay more attention to a good guitar solo than to Madonna's bellybutton.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
For San Diego rock fans, perhaps the best news of the holiday season is that Robert Vaughn and the Shadows have returned to the local nightclub scene for a series of pre-Christmas gigs at Rio's in Loma Portal. A year ago, the Point Loma band was celebrating the release of its debut album on Island Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
There's a lot going on in this world that Robert Vaughn doesn't like: political oppression in Central America, rampant warfare in the Middle East, apartheid in South Africa. So instead of tackling such themes as first loves and growing pains, Vaughn, 27, tends to write songs about the problems of the world and what to do about them. "Music without a message is basically vain," he said. "Music is a powerful vehicle, and that vehicle can be used to bless or curse, to build up or destroy.
SPORTS
November 19, 2006 | MARK HEISLER
Before the Lakers and Clippers meet Tuesday in the city series, we'll be awash in quotes denying any rivalry. Everyone will be sincere ... as far as they go. Intangibles count too. As Robert Vaughn, playing the villain in "Superman III," noted, "You know, a wise man once said, I think it was Attila the Hun, 'It is not enough that I succeed, everyone else must fail.' " And who better than the haughty poseurs, or the flies on their windshield down the corridor?
SPORTS
November 19, 2006 | MARK HEISLER
Before the Lakers and Clippers meet Tuesday in the city series, we'll be awash in quotes denying any rivalry. Everyone will be sincere ... as far as they go. Intangibles count too. As Robert Vaughn, playing the villain in "Superman III," noted, "You know, a wise man once said, I think it was Attila the Hun, 'It is not enough that I succeed, everyone else must fail.' " And who better than the haughty poseurs, or the flies on their windshield down the corridor?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Robert Vaughn has three "rules of engagement" when it comes to picking a project: "I need to know where it's going to be shot," he says. "I have to know how much money I am going to be paid. And then I ask to read the script after that." If the acting assignment is in London or Paris, Vaughn, 73, doesn't even care about the script. So it was just icing on the cake that he loved the first two screenplays he was sent by the BBC producers for the lighthearted series "Hustle," which makes its U.S.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Man From U.N.C.L.E. raises a little "Caine" this week on Kung Fu: The Legend Continues. Yes, grasshoppers, Robert Vaughn, the sexy superspy Napoleon Solo of "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." fame, guests on the syndicated David Carradine series in an episode titled "Dragonswing." But Vaughn's not the only '60s icon dropping by. Patrick MacNee, who played sophisticated British spy John Steed on "The Avengers," also is featured.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993 | DIANE WERTS, NEWSDAY
He's just making a quick stop in New York City--two days-- because he's sailing next week for a month's tour of Europe, then heading up to Nantucket. At least he's here long enough to lunch at the Russian Tea Room, where he nods hello to fellow note-worthies as he regales his booth companions with tales of past and present adventures. His intercontinental travels from Yugoslavia to Peru. His activism in the '60s when he led anti-war efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local musician Robert Vaughn has an impressive list of career credits. As leader and songwriter of RV and the Shadows, the vocalist-guitarist landed a major-label contract in 1987 with Island Records. A subsequent single, "Justice," received national airplay, and the band'sdebut album, "Love and War," sold respectably--its full potential possibly stunted by Island's near-total concentration on pushing U2's breakthrough opus, "The Joshua Tree."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
For San Diego rock fans, perhaps the best news of the holiday season is that Robert Vaughn and the Shadows have returned to the local nightclub scene for a series of pre-Christmas gigs at Rio's in Loma Portal. A year ago, the Point Loma band was celebrating the release of its debut album on Island Records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2012 | By Robert Abele
"Excuse Me for Living" is a problems-of-the-rich comedy that only an old, out-of-touch billionaire could love. Writer/director Ric Klass' story about a drug-addicted, jerkish twentysomething (Tom Pelphrey) who falls for the sexually promiscuous daughter (Melissa Archer) of his court-appointed doctor (Robert Vaughn) depicts today's youth as reckless and ungrateful, the older generation as wise and worth heeding. Pelphrey's suicidal med school dropout is forced by Vaughn's Dr. Bernstein to attend a seniors group therapy meeting (which includes a role for Jerry Stiller)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local musician Robert Vaughn has an impressive list of career credits. As leader and songwriter of RV and the Shadows, the vocalist-guitarist landed a major-label contract in 1987 with Island Records. A subsequent single, "Justice," received national airplay, and the band'sdebut album, "Love and War," sold respectably--its full potential possibly stunted by Island's near-total concentration on pushing U2's breakthrough opus, "The Joshua Tree."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
- Hard-core rock 'n' roll fans tired of discotheques or Top 40 nightclubs now have an alternative to spending Saturday nights at home, listening to old Jimi Hendrix or Johnny Winter albums and wistfully reminiscing about how people used to pay more attention to a good guitar solo than to Madonna's bellybutton.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
There's a lot going on in this world that Robert Vaughn doesn't like: political oppression in Central America, rampant warfare in the Middle East, apartheid in South Africa. So instead of tackling such themes as first loves and growing pains, Vaughn, 27, tends to write songs about the problems of the world and what to do about them. "Music without a message is basically vain," he said. "Music is a powerful vehicle, and that vehicle can be used to bless or curse, to build up or destroy.
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