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Robert Venturi

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April 8, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Robert Venturi, an architectural free-thinker and outspoken champion of ordinary American buildings, is the 1991 winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. The annual award, known as the Nobel Prize of architecture, consists of a $100,000 grant, a bronze medallion and a certificate. Venturi will receive the prize on May 16 in a ceremony at Palacio de Iturbide in Mexico City.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne
In the 1970s, architecture faced an identity crisis. A lacerating critique of modern architecture's overreach, especially in remaking wide swaths of cities, had left the profession's 20th-century heroes - Le Corbusier, Mies Van der Rohe, even Frank Lloyd Wright - without many prominent defenders. But what would take modernism's place? What could architecture do with the rubble of that once dominant movement? Hans Hollein, the Austrian architect who died Thursday in Vienna at 80, according to a family spokeswoman cited by the Associated Press, was among those who provided convincing early answers to those questions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Organizers of the Pritzker Architecture Prize - the highest award in the field of architecture - have turned down a request to retroactively honor Denise Scott Brown, whose design partner and husband Robert Venturi received the award in 1991. Peter Palumbo, the current chair of the Pritzker jury, said in a letter that "Pritzker juries, over time, are made up of different individuals.... A later jury cannot reopen or second-guess the work of an earlier jury, and none has ever done so. " The letter, dated June 14, was addressed to the leaders of a group known as Women in Design, at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The American Institute of Architects has broken the gender barrier for its highest award, the gold medal. The 2014 medal is going to famed California architect Julia Morgan nearly 57 years after her death in 1957 and more than 100 years after the first gold medal was conferred. Morgan, whose most famous building is Hearst Castle at San Simeon on California's central coast, was “a pivotal figure in the history of American architecture and American women,” according to an article the AIA published on its website announcing the award -- the eighth gold medal awarded posthumously.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
Unveiling his design for an $11-million addition to the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, noted Post-Modern architect Robert Venturi said Wednesday that he plans to expose some of the museum's original Irving Gill architecture--now hidden. Speaking at a news conference here, Venturi praised the work of Gill, who designed the Ellen Browning Scripps house that in the 1940s became the museum. "It was very, very ahead of its time," Venturi said. "It was so abstract in its form.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The new PBS program "10 Buildings That Changed America" is nothing if not efficient. In a single breezy hour, it moves from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Gehry, racing in a chronological blur past Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Venturi and a handful of other bold-faced architectural names along the way. Geoffrey Baer, the curious and upbeat host, sometimes has to trade nuance for forward momentum in an effort to keep up the pace. But in the end the show is more rewarding - and even in a couple of spots more substantial - than you might guess.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The American Institute of Architects has broken the gender barrier for its highest award, the gold medal. The 2014 medal is going to famed California architect Julia Morgan nearly 57 years after her death in 1957 and more than 100 years after the first gold medal was conferred. Morgan, whose most famous building is Hearst Castle at San Simeon on California's central coast, was “a pivotal figure in the history of American architecture and American women,” according to an article the AIA published on its website announcing the award -- the eighth gold medal awarded posthumously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne
In the 1970s, architecture faced an identity crisis. A lacerating critique of modern architecture's overreach, especially in remaking wide swaths of cities, had left the profession's 20th-century heroes - Le Corbusier, Mies Van der Rohe, even Frank Lloyd Wright - without many prominent defenders. But what would take modernism's place? What could architecture do with the rubble of that once dominant movement? Hans Hollein, the Austrian architect who died Thursday in Vienna at 80, according to a family spokeswoman cited by the Associated Press, was among those who provided convincing early answers to those questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The new Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood isn't just the first ground-up building by the 42-year-old Los Angeles architect Peter Zellner. A clean-lined, windowless stucco box on Orange Grove Avenue just south of Santa Monica Boulevard, it is also almost entirely free-standing. Attached on one of its four sides to a mortuary, it is otherwise visible in the round, making it one of the most conspicuous architectural debuts to appear in Southern California in a number of years. At the same time, Zellner's design operates in large part as the straightforward and accommodating backdrop for an artwork by the 88-year-old artist Ellsworth Kelly.
OPINION
August 18, 1991 | James Sanders, James Sanders is an architect. His book, "Celluloid Skyline: New York and the Movies," will be published by Alfred Knopf. He interviewed Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown in their office
The husband-and-wife team of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown has long been considered among the world's most influential architects. Venturi's first book, "Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture" (1966), exploded a half-century of modernism's iron grip on architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Organizers of the Pritzker Architecture Prize - the highest award in the field of architecture - have turned down a request to retroactively honor Denise Scott Brown, whose design partner and husband Robert Venturi received the award in 1991. Peter Palumbo, the current chair of the Pritzker jury, said in a letter that "Pritzker juries, over time, are made up of different individuals.... A later jury cannot reopen or second-guess the work of an earlier jury, and none has ever done so. " The letter, dated June 14, was addressed to the leaders of a group known as Women in Design, at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The new PBS program "10 Buildings That Changed America" is nothing if not efficient. In a single breezy hour, it moves from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Gehry, racing in a chronological blur past Frank Lloyd Wright, Robert Venturi and a handful of other bold-faced architectural names along the way. Geoffrey Baer, the curious and upbeat host, sometimes has to trade nuance for forward momentum in an effort to keep up the pace. But in the end the show is more rewarding - and even in a couple of spots more substantial - than you might guess.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The new Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood isn't just the first ground-up building by the 42-year-old Los Angeles architect Peter Zellner. A clean-lined, windowless stucco box on Orange Grove Avenue just south of Santa Monica Boulevard, it is also almost entirely free-standing. Attached on one of its four sides to a mortuary, it is otherwise visible in the round, making it one of the most conspicuous architectural debuts to appear in Southern California in a number of years. At the same time, Zellner's design operates in large part as the straightforward and accommodating backdrop for an artwork by the 88-year-old artist Ellsworth Kelly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
'Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown' Where: MOCA Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood When: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues.-Fri.; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat. and Sun. Price: Free Contact: (310) 289-5223; www.moca.org
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, Christopher Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown are a dapper, steel-willed couple of architects with courtly manners and tastes more catholic than some people find seemly. These enthusiasms include, but are not limited to, Italian palazzos, Las Vegas, neon, Pennsylvania farmhouses, Shakespearean sonnets, Lionel trains, Mickey Mouse, miniskirts and the mosques of Cairo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1994 | Pilar Viladas, Pilar Viladas is a free-lance writer and contributing writer for Architectural Digest. and
Standing in the bright La Jolla sun--he in a navy blazer, gray trousers, sober tie and horn-rimmed glasses, and she in a nicely cut putty-colored jacket, black skirt and good, black, low-heeled shoes--Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown appear more like an upper-middle-class couple visiting from the East than a pair of world-famous architects. Given this conservative camouflage, you wouldn't expect the Philadelphia-based husband-and-wife team to be infamous architectural radicals, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
'Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown' Where: MOCA Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood When: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues.-Fri.; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat. and Sun. Price: Free Contact: (310) 289-5223; www.moca.org
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choral director Robert Shaw, who serves as principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony, was chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts, along with architect Robert Venturi, who designed a proposed addition for the La Jolla-based Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choral director Robert Shaw, who serves as principal guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony, was chosen to receive the 1992 National Medal of Arts, along with architect Robert Venturi, who designed a proposed addition for the La Jolla-based Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. President Bush will honor this year's recipients today at a White House ceremony.
OPINION
August 18, 1991 | James Sanders, James Sanders is an architect. His book, "Celluloid Skyline: New York and the Movies," will be published by Alfred Knopf. He interviewed Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown in their office
The husband-and-wife team of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown has long been considered among the world's most influential architects. Venturi's first book, "Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture" (1966), exploded a half-century of modernism's iron grip on architecture.
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