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Robert Voy

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March 2, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Dr. Robert Voy, chief medical officer of the United States Olympic Committee, has been outspoken in an effort to stop athletes' use of anabolic steroids. But he has been frustrated because he believes few were listening. Late Wednesday when he learned of testimony at a Canadian inquiry that made widespread allegations into steroid use in track and field, Voy seemed relieved. "I'm not happy about the implications," he said from his home at Colorado Springs, Colo.
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SPORTS
June 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Robert Voy, the controversial head of the U.S. Olympic Committee's anti-doping campaign in the 1980s, said Friday he too believes that the USOC is not sincerely interested in stopping athletes from using performance-enhancing drugs. Speaking in the wake of the abrupt resignation of his successor, Dr.
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SPORTS
March 8, 1989
Robert O. Voy, chief medical officer for the U.S. Olympic Committee, announced Tuesday that he will resign March 17 to become medical director of the Las Vegas Institute of Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine. Voy, 55, who plans to begin a private family practice in Las Vegas, helped develop the USOC's drug-testing program, beginning in 1983.
SPORTS
March 12, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The board of directors of The Athletics Congress, the governing body for track and field in the United States, will take a historic vote today at a meeting in Indianapolis. If it goes as expected, track and field will become the first sport in the United States to approve a random, unannounced drug-testing program for athletes in training.
SPORTS
October 16, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Saying that he expected to take heat for his remarks, Dr. Robert Voy, the United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, said Thursday that he is dubious about results of drug tests at last summer's U.S. and World Track and Field Championships. Voy emphasized that he has no evidence that positive drug tests were suppressed at either meet.
SPORTS
March 11, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Five years of fighting the epidemic of drugs in sport and the often more vicious political battles with sports administrators took their toll on Dr. Robert Voy. The United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer announced his resignation earlier this week, saying his back was to the wall. Voy's resignation was not unexpected, given the mounting tension between him and USOC leadership.
SPORTS
June 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Robert Voy, the controversial head of the U.S. Olympic Committee's anti-doping campaign in the 1980s, said Friday he too believes that the USOC is not sincerely interested in stopping athletes from using performance-enhancing drugs. Speaking in the wake of the abrupt resignation of his successor, Dr.
SPORTS
March 12, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The board of directors of The Athletics Congress, the governing body for track and field in the United States, will take a historic vote today at a meeting in Indianapolis. If it goes as expected, track and field will become the first sport in the United States to approve a random, unannounced drug-testing program for athletes in training.
SPORTS
January 22, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY and JULIE CART, Times Staff Writers
He has been eluded by athletes who continue to flout the system, excluded by administrators who believe that he should hold his tongue, and deluded by his faith in a science that has failed to overcome the drug problem in sports. Five years after he became the U.S. Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, Dr. Robert Voy may soon hang up his beakers and return to private practice.
SPORTS
August 22, 1988 | Randy Harvey
The Anchorage Organizing Committee was so intent upon convincing the rest of the world that the 1994 Winter Olympics should be held in Alaska that it ignored its own city. That changed in April, when the Anchorage Assembly, upon learning that the city would have to cover any losses resulting from the Olympics, called for a referendum to be included on Tuesday's state primary ballot.
SPORTS
March 11, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Five years of fighting the epidemic of drugs in sport and the often more vicious political battles with sports administrators took their toll on Dr. Robert Voy. The United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer announced his resignation earlier this week, saying his back was to the wall. Voy's resignation was not unexpected, given the mounting tension between him and USOC leadership.
SPORTS
March 8, 1989
Robert O. Voy, chief medical officer for the U.S. Olympic Committee, announced Tuesday that he will resign March 17 to become medical director of the Las Vegas Institute of Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine. Voy, 55, who plans to begin a private family practice in Las Vegas, helped develop the USOC's drug-testing program, beginning in 1983.
SPORTS
March 2, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Dr. Robert Voy, chief medical officer of the United States Olympic Committee, has been outspoken in an effort to stop athletes' use of anabolic steroids. But he has been frustrated because he believes few were listening. Late Wednesday when he learned of testimony at a Canadian inquiry that made widespread allegations into steroid use in track and field, Voy seemed relieved. "I'm not happy about the implications," he said from his home at Colorado Springs, Colo.
SPORTS
January 22, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY and JULIE CART, Times Staff Writers
He has been eluded by athletes who continue to flout the system, excluded by administrators who believe that he should hold his tongue, and deluded by his faith in a science that has failed to overcome the drug problem in sports. Five years after he became the U.S. Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, Dr. Robert Voy may soon hang up his beakers and return to private practice.
SPORTS
August 22, 1988 | Randy Harvey
The Anchorage Organizing Committee was so intent upon convincing the rest of the world that the 1994 Winter Olympics should be held in Alaska that it ignored its own city. That changed in April, when the Anchorage Assembly, upon learning that the city would have to cover any losses resulting from the Olympics, called for a referendum to be included on Tuesday's state primary ballot.
SPORTS
October 16, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Saying that he expected to take heat for his remarks, Dr. Robert Voy, the United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, said Thursday that he is dubious about results of drug tests at last summer's U.S. and World Track and Field Championships. Voy emphasized that he has no evidence that positive drug tests were suppressed at either meet.
SPORTS
October 16, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National swim team coaches from the United States, Hong Kong and Australia suspect the Chinese women's team of using steroids in the wake of China's world-best performances during last month's Asian Games. Richard Quick, coach of the U.S. national team and Stanford women's team, said he felt obligated to speak out after the Chinese produced three times that rank No. 1 in the world this year and three others that are No. 2 during the competition at Beijing.
SPORTS
September 22, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Chairs, water bottles and fists, ungloved ones, flew in Ring B at the Olympic boxing arena Thursday morning when outraged South Koreans attacked a referee. The mini-riot broke out seconds after Bulgaria's Alexander Hristov had been awarded a 4-1 decision over South Korea's Byun Jong-il. A South Korean coach and a team manager entered the ring first, the team manager grabbing the referee, Keith Walker of New Zealand, by the arm and shouting in his face.
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